Commit a3053e27 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor clarifications.

parent 54b6e2d1
......@@ -87,8 +87,8 @@ selected buffer other than the current buffer.
@findex switch-to-buffer
To select the buffer named @var{bufname}, type @kbd{C-x b @var{bufname}
@key{RET}}. This runs the command @code{switch-to-buffer} with argument
@var{bufname}. You can use completion on an abbreviation for the buffer
name you want (@pxref{Completion}). An empty argument to @kbd{C-x b}
@var{bufname}. You can use completion to enter the buffer
name (@pxref{Completion}). An empty argument to @kbd{C-x b}
specifies the buffer that was current most recently among those not
now displayed in any window.
......@@ -128,7 +128,7 @@ customizing the variables @code{special-display-buffer-names},
@ref{Special Buffer Frames}, for more about these variables. In
addition, if the value of @code{display-buffer-reuse-frames} is
non-@code{nil}, and the buffer you want to switch to is already
displayed in some frame, Emacs will raise that frame.
displayed in some frame, Emacs will just raise that frame.
Most buffers are created by visiting files, or by Emacs commands that
want to display some text, but you can also create a buffer explicitly
......@@ -177,10 +177,11 @@ line in the list shows one buffer's name, major mode and visited file.
The buffers are listed in the order that they were current; the
buffers that were current most recently come first.
@samp{*} in the first field of a line indicates the buffer is ``modified.''
If several buffers are modified, it may be time to save some with @kbd{C-x s}
(@pxref{Save Commands}). @samp{%} indicates a read-only buffer. @samp{.} marks the
current buffer. Here is an example of a buffer list:@refill
@samp{*} in the first field of a line indicates the buffer is
``modified.'' If several buffers are modified, it may be time to save
some with @kbd{C-x s} (@pxref{Save Commands}). @samp{%} indicates a
read-only buffer. @samp{.} marks the current buffer. Here is an
example of a buffer list:@refill
@smallexample
CRM Buffer Size Mode File
......@@ -199,7 +200,7 @@ CRM Buffer Size Mode File
Note that the buffer @samp{*Help*} was made by a help request; it is
not visiting any file. The buffer @code{src} was made by Dired on the
directory @file{~/cvs/emacs/src/}. You can list only buffers that are
visiting files by giving the command a prefix; for instance, by typing
visiting files by giving the command a prefix argument, as in
@kbd{C-u C-x C-b}.
@code{list-buffers} omits buffers whose names begin with a space,
......@@ -243,10 +244,10 @@ flag, but it also checks the file in or out. @xref{Version
Control}.
@findex rename-buffer
@kbd{M-x rename-buffer} changes the name of the current buffer. Specify
the new name as a minibuffer argument. There is no default. If you
specify a name that is in use for some other buffer, an error happens and
no renaming is done.
@kbd{M-x rename-buffer} changes the name of the current buffer. You
specify the new name as a minibuffer argument; there is no default.
If you specify a name that is in use for some other buffer, an error
happens and no renaming is done.
@findex rename-uniquely
@kbd{M-x rename-uniquely} renames the current buffer to a similar
......@@ -274,7 +275,7 @@ your perusal remain in effect.
The commands @kbd{M-x append-to-buffer} and @kbd{M-x insert-buffer}
can be used to copy text from one buffer to another. @xref{Accumulating
Text}.@refill
Text}.
@node Kill Buffer
@section Killing Buffers
......@@ -470,17 +471,15 @@ you run @code{list-buffers} (that is, type @kbd{C-x C-b}) and select
the buffer list manually, you can use all of the commands described
here.
Normally, the buffer @samp{*Buffer List*} is not updated automatically when
buffers are created and killed; its contents are just text. If you have
created, deleted or renamed buffers, the way to update @samp{*Buffer
List*} to show what you have done is to type @kbd{g}
(@code{revert-buffer}) or repeat the @code{buffer-menu} command.
The @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer does automatically update every
@code{auto-revert-interval} seconds if you enable Auto Revert mode in
it. (As long as it is not marked modified.) Global Auto Revert mode
does not update the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer by default, but it
does if @code{global-auto-revert-non-file-buffers} is non-@code{nil}.
Normally, the buffer @samp{*Buffer List*} is not updated
automatically when buffers are created and killed; its contents are
just text. If you have created, deleted or renamed buffers, the way
to update @samp{*Buffer List*} to show what you have done is to type
@kbd{g} (@code{revert-buffer}). You can make this happen regularly
every @code{auto-revert-interval} seconds if you enable Auto Revert
mode in this buffer, as long as it is not marked modified. Global
Auto Revert mode applies to the @samp{*Buffer List*} buffer only if
@code{global-auto-revert-non-file-buffers} is non-@code{nil}.
@inforef{Autorevert,, emacs-xtra}, for details.
The command @code{buffer-menu-other-window} works the same as
......@@ -589,7 +588,7 @@ forward order after the file name, as in @samp{file|top/middle}.
name is not very important if you are going to @emph{look} at the
buffer names before you type one. But as an experienced user, if you
know the rule, you won't have to look. And then you may find that one
rule or another is easier for you to remember and utilize fast.
rule or another is easier for you to remember and apply quickly.
@node Iswitchb
@subsection Switching Between Buffers using Substrings
......
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ Insert a tab character. You can type @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to do this.
A tab character is displayed as a stretch of whitespace which extends
to the next display tab stop position, and the default width of a tab
stop is eight. @xref{Display Custom}, for more details.
stop is eight. @xref{Text Display}, for more details.
@item
Insert whitespace up to the next tab stop. You can set tab stops at
......@@ -114,13 +114,13 @@ regard, @kbd{C-M-o} resembles @kbd{C-o}.
@kindex M-^
@findex delete-indentation
To join two lines cleanly, use the @kbd{M-^}
(@code{delete-indentation}) command. It deletes the indentation at the
front of the current line, and the line boundary as well, replacing them
with a single space. As a special case (useful for Lisp code) the
single space is omitted if the characters to be joined are consecutive
open parentheses or closing parentheses, or if the junction follows
another newline. To delete just the indentation of a line, go to the
beginning of the line and use @kbd{M-\}
(@code{delete-indentation}) command. It deletes the indentation at
the front of the current line, and the line boundary as well,
replacing them with a single space. As a special case (useful for
Lisp code) the single space is omitted if the characters to be joined
are consecutive open parentheses or closing parentheses, or if the
junction follows another newline. To delete just the indentation of a
line, go to the beginning of the line and use @kbd{M-\}
(@code{delete-horizontal-space}), which deletes all spaces and tabs
around the cursor.
......@@ -140,12 +140,12 @@ shifted left or right so that its first nonblank character appears in
that column. @kbd{C-x @key{TAB}} (@code{indent-rigidly}) moves all of
the lines in the region right by its argument (left, for negative
arguments). The whole group of lines moves rigidly sideways, which is
how the command gets its name.@refill
how the command gets its name.
@cindex remove indentation
If you want to remove all indentation from all of the line in the
region, invoke @kbd{C-x @key{TAB}} with a large negative argument,
such as -1000.
To remove all indentation from all of the lines in the region,
invoke @kbd{C-x @key{TAB}} with a large negative argument, such as
-1000.
@findex indent-relative
@kbd{M-x indent-relative} indents at point based on the previous line
......
......@@ -65,10 +65,10 @@ because most lines in a program are usually indented
most of the time Emacs determines which mode to use based on the file
name or on special text in the file.
Explicit selection of a new major mode is done with a @kbd{M-x} command.
From the name of a major mode, add @code{-mode} to get the name of a
command to select that mode. Thus, you can enter Lisp mode by executing
@kbd{M-x lisp-mode}.
To explicitly select a new major, you use an @kbd{M-x} command.
Take the name of a major mode and add @code{-mode} to get the name of
the command to select that mode. Thus, you can enter Lisp mode by
executing @kbd{M-x lisp-mode}.
@vindex auto-mode-alist
When you visit a file, Emacs usually chooses the right major mode based
......
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