Commit a4180391 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

format-time-string now supports subsecond time stamp resolution

parent abb97fbb
2011-02-01 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
format-time-string now supports subsecond time stamp resolution
* os.texi (Time Parsing): Document %N.
2011-01-28 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* vol1.texi (Top):
......
......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ terminal and the screen.
* System Environment:: Distinguish the name and kind of system.
* User Identification:: Finding the name and user id of the user.
* Time of Day:: Getting the current time.
* Time Conversion:: Converting a time from numeric form to
* Time Conversion:: Converting a time from numeric form to
calendrical data and vice versa.
* Time Parsing:: Converting a time from numeric form to text
and vice versa.
......@@ -1336,6 +1336,12 @@ This stands for the month (01-12).
This stands for the minute (00-59).
@item %n
This stands for a newline.
@item %N
This stands for the nanoseconds (000000000-999999999). To ask for
fewer digits, use @samp{%3N} for milliseconds, @samp{%6N} for
microseconds, etc. Any excess digits are discarded, without rounding.
Currently Emacs time stamps are at best microsecond resolution so the
last three digits generated by plain @samp{%N} are always zero.
@item %p
This stands for @samp{AM} or @samp{PM}, as appropriate.
@item %r
......
2011-02-01 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
format-time-string now supports subsecond time stamp resolution
* NEWS: Document this.
2011-01-28 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
Redo spelling of Makefile variables to conform to POSIX.
......
......@@ -169,6 +169,10 @@ get and set the SELinux context of a file.
*** Tramp offers handlers for file-selinux-context and set-file-selinux-context
for remote machines which support SELinux.
+++
** The function format-time-string now supports the %N directive, for
higher-resolution time stamps.
** The function kill-emacs is now run upon receipt of the signals SIGTERM
and SIGHUP, and upon SIGINT in batch mode.
......
2011-02-01 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
format-time-string now supports subsecond time stamp resolution
* editfns.c (emacs_nmemftime): Renamed from emacs_memftimeu,
for consistency with its new argument and with gnulib nstrftime.
All callers changed. New argument NS.
(Fformat_time_string): Check that the time argument's microseconds
component, if any, is in range; this avoids integer overflow and
also nstrftime needs this. Document %N.
2011-01-31 Andreas Schwab <schwab@linux-m68k.org>
* image.c (DEF_IMGLIB_FN): Add parameter rettype, use it instead
......@@ -92,8 +92,8 @@ static void find_field (Lisp_Object, Lisp_Object, Lisp_Object,
EMACS_INT *, Lisp_Object, EMACS_INT *);
static void update_buffer_properties (EMACS_INT, EMACS_INT);
static Lisp_Object region_limit (int);
static size_t emacs_memftimeu (char *, size_t, const char *,
size_t, const struct tm *, int);
static size_t emacs_nmemftime (char *, size_t, const char *,
size_t, const struct tm *, int, int);
static void general_insert_function (void (*) (const unsigned char *, EMACS_INT),
void (*) (Lisp_Object, EMACS_INT,
EMACS_INT, EMACS_INT,
......@@ -1549,6 +1549,7 @@ or (if you need time as a string) `format-time-string'. */)
/* Write information into buffer S of size MAXSIZE, according to the
FORMAT of length FORMAT_LEN, using time information taken from *TP.
Default to Universal Time if UT is nonzero, local time otherwise.
Use NS as the number of nanoseconds in the %N directive.
Return the number of bytes written, not including the terminating
'\0'. If S is NULL, nothing will be written anywhere; so to
determine how many bytes would be written, use NULL for S and
......@@ -1557,7 +1558,8 @@ or (if you need time as a string) `format-time-string'. */)
This function behaves like nstrftime, except it allows null
bytes in FORMAT and it does not support nanoseconds. */
static size_t
emacs_memftimeu (char *s, size_t maxsize, const char *format, size_t format_len, const struct tm *tp, int ut)
emacs_nmemftime (char *s, size_t maxsize, const char *format,
size_t format_len, const struct tm *tp, int ut, int ns)
{
size_t total = 0;
......@@ -1574,7 +1576,7 @@ emacs_memftimeu (char *s, size_t maxsize, const char *format, size_t format_len,
if (s)
s[0] = '\1';
result = nstrftime (s, maxsize, format, tp, ut, 0);
result = nstrftime (s, maxsize, format, tp, ut, ns);
if (s)
{
......@@ -1620,6 +1622,7 @@ by text that describes the specified date and time in TIME:
%p is the locale's equivalent of either AM or PM.
%M is the minute.
%S is the second.
%N is the nanosecond, %6N the microsecond, %3N the millisecond, etc.
%Z is the time zone name, %z is the numeric form.
%s is the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000.
......@@ -1649,13 +1652,17 @@ For example, to produce full ISO 8601 format, use "%Y-%m-%dT%T%z". */)
{
time_t value;
int size;
int usec;
int ns;
struct tm *tm;
int ut = ! NILP (universal);
CHECK_STRING (format_string);
if (! lisp_time_argument (time, &value, NULL))
if (! (lisp_time_argument (time, &value, &usec)
&& 0 <= usec && usec < 1000000))
error ("Invalid time specification");
ns = usec * 1000;
format_string = code_convert_string_norecord (format_string,
Vlocale_coding_system, 1);
......@@ -1678,9 +1685,9 @@ For example, to produce full ISO 8601 format, use "%Y-%m-%dT%T%z". */)
buf[0] = '\1';
BLOCK_INPUT;
result = emacs_memftimeu (buf, size, SSDATA (format_string),
result = emacs_nmemftime (buf, size, SSDATA (format_string),
SBYTES (format_string),
tm, ut);
tm, ut, ns);
UNBLOCK_INPUT;
if ((result > 0 && result < size) || (result == 0 && buf[0] == '\0'))
return code_convert_string_norecord (make_unibyte_string (buf, result),
......@@ -1688,10 +1695,10 @@ For example, to produce full ISO 8601 format, use "%Y-%m-%dT%T%z". */)
/* If buffer was too small, make it bigger and try again. */
BLOCK_INPUT;
result = emacs_memftimeu (NULL, (size_t) -1,
result = emacs_nmemftime (NULL, (size_t) -1,
SSDATA (format_string),
SBYTES (format_string),
tm, ut);
tm, ut, ns);
UNBLOCK_INPUT;
size = result + 1;
}
......
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