Commit a560da7e authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

(Intro to Minibuffers): Remove long-obsolete info

about minibuffers in old Emacs versions.  Copyedits.  Emphasize
that enable-recursive-minibuffers defaults to nil.
(Text from Minibuffer): Simplify introduction.
parent 7b34420d
......@@ -56,17 +56,15 @@ read-only so you won't accidentally delete or change it. It is also
marked as a field (@pxref{Fields}), so that certain motion functions,
including @code{beginning-of-line}, @code{forward-word},
@code{forward-sentence}, and @code{forward-paragraph}, stop at the
boundary between the prompt and the actual text. (In older Emacs
versions, the prompt was displayed using a special mechanism and was not
part of the buffer contents.)
boundary between the prompt and the actual text.
The minibuffer's window is normally a single line; it grows
automatically if necessary if the contents require more space. You can
explicitly resize it temporarily with the window sizing commands; it
reverts to its normal size when the minibuffer is exited. You can
resize it permanently by using the window sizing commands in the frame's
other window, when the minibuffer is not active. If the frame contains
just a minibuffer, you can change the minibuffer's size by changing the
automatically if the contents require more space. You can explicitly
resize it temporarily with the window sizing commands; it reverts to
its normal size when the minibuffer is exited. You can resize it
permanently by using the window sizing commands in the frame's other
window, when the minibuffer is not active. If the frame contains just
a minibuffer, you can change the minibuffer's size by changing the
frame's size.
Use of the minibuffer reads input events, and that alters the values
......@@ -74,16 +72,17 @@ of variables such as @code{this-command} and @code{last-command}
(@pxref{Command Loop Info}). Your program should bind them around the
code that uses the minibuffer, if you do not want that to change them.
If a command uses a minibuffer while there is an active minibuffer,
this is called a @dfn{recursive minibuffer}. The first minibuffer is
named @w{@samp{ *Minibuf-0*}}. Recursive minibuffers are named by
incrementing the number at the end of the name. (The names begin with a
space so that they won't show up in normal buffer lists.) Of several
recursive minibuffers, the innermost (or most recently entered) is the
active minibuffer. We usually call this ``the'' minibuffer. You can
permit or forbid recursive minibuffers by setting the variable
@code{enable-recursive-minibuffers} or by putting properties of that
name on command symbols (@pxref{Recursive Mini}).
Under some circumstances, a command can use a minibuffer even if
there is an active minibuffer; such minibuffers are called a
@dfn{recursive minibuffer}. The first minibuffer is named
@w{ @samp{*Minibuf-0*}}. Recursive minibuffers are named by
incrementing the number at the end of the name. (The names begin with
a space so that they won't show up in normal buffer lists.) Of
several recursive minibuffers, the innermost (or most recently
entered) is the active minibuffer. We usually call this ``the''
minibuffer. You can permit or forbid recursive minibuffers by setting
the variable @code{enable-recursive-minibuffers}, or by putting
properties of that name on command symbols (@xref{Recursive Mini}.
Like other buffers, a minibuffer uses a local keymap
(@pxref{Keymaps}) to specify special key bindings. The function that
......@@ -99,13 +98,13 @@ was supplied when Emacs was started.
@node Text from Minibuffer
@section Reading Text Strings with the Minibuffer
Most often, the minibuffer is used to read text as a string. It can
also be used to read a Lisp object in textual form. The most basic
primitive for minibuffer input is @code{read-from-minibuffer}; it can
do either one. Regular expressions (@pxref{Regular Expressions}) are
a special kind of strings; use @code{read-regexp} for their minibuffer
input. There are also specialized commands for reading commands,
variables, file names, etc.@: (@pxref{Completion}).
The most basic primitive for minibuffer input is
@code{read-from-minibuffer}, which can be used to read either a string
or a Lisp object in textual form. The function @code{read-regexp} is
used for reading regular expressions (@pxref{Regular Expressions}),
which are a special kind of string. There are also specialized
functions for reading commands, variables, file names, etc.@:
(@pxref{Completion}).
In most cases, you should not call minibuffer input functions in the
middle of a Lisp function. Instead, do all minibuffer input as part of
......@@ -113,7 +112,7 @@ reading the arguments for a command, in the @code{interactive}
specification. @xref{Defining Commands}.
@defun read-from-minibuffer prompt-string &optional initial-contents keymap read hist default inherit-input-method
This function is the most general way to get input through the
This function is the most general way to get input from the
minibuffer. By default, it accepts arbitrary text and returns it as a
string; however, if @var{read} is non-@code{nil}, then it uses
@code{read} to convert the text into a Lisp object (@pxref{Input
......
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