Commit a83e8765 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Clean up and move index-searching recommendation.

Other minor changes.
parent 08d376e3
......@@ -33,40 +33,42 @@ define other meanings for it, but they all support @key{F1}.)
Most help buffers use a special major mode, Help mode, which lets you
scroll conveniently with @key{SPC} and @key{DEL}. It also offers
hyperlinks to more help on cross-referenced names, Info nodes,
hyperlinks to further help regarding cross-referenced names, Info nodes,
customization buffers and the like. @xref{Help Mode}.
@cindex searching documentation efficiently
@cindex looking for a subject in documentation
If you are looking for a certain feature, but don't know where exactly
it is documented, and aren't even sure what is the name of the related
command or option, we recommend the following procedure:
command or option, we recommend these commands:
@table @kbd
@item C-h a @var{topic} @key{RET}
This searches for commands whose names match @var{topic}. @var{topic}
is a regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}). Browse the buffer popped up
by Emacs, to find what you are looking for. @xref{Apropos}.
This searches for commands whose names match @var{topic}, which should
be a regular expression (@pxref{Regexps}). Browse the buffer popped
up by Emacs, to find what you are looking for. @xref{Apropos}.
@item M-x apropos @var{topic} @key{RET}
This works like @kbd{C-h a}, but it also searches for user options and
other variables, in case the feature you are looking for is controlled
by an option, not a command. @xref{Apropos}.
@item C-h i m emacs @key{RET} i @var{topic} @key{RET}
This looks up @var{topic} in the indices of the Emacs on-line manual.
Press @key{,} repetitively until you find what you are looking for.
@item C-h i m emacs @key{RET} s @var{topic} @key{RET}
This works like the previous command, but it searches for @var{topic}
(which can be a regular expression) in the @emph{text} of the manual
rather than in its indices.
@item M-x apropos-documentation @var{topic} @key{RET}
This searches the @emph{documentation strings} (the built-in short
descriptions) of all variables and functions (not their names) for a
match for @var{topic}, a regular expression. @xref{Apropos}.
@item C-h i m emacs @key{RET} i @var{topic} @key{RET}
This looks up @var{topic} in the indices of the Emacs on-line manual.
There may be several matches, so displays the first one. You can then
press @key{,} to move to other matches, until you find what you are
looking for.
@item C-h i m emacs @key{RET} s @var{topic} @key{RET}
Similar, but searches for @var{topic} (which can be a regular
expression) in the @emph{text} of the manual rather than in its
indices.
@item C-h F
This brings up the Emacs FAQ, where you can use the usual search
commands (@pxref{Search}) to find the information.
......@@ -252,11 +254,13 @@ Lisp variables instead of Lisp functions. Its default is the Lisp symbol
around or before point, but only if that is the name of a known Lisp
variable. @xref{Variables}.@refill
Help buffers describing variables or functions defined in Lisp normally
have hyperlinks to their definitions if you have the Lisp source files
installed. If you can read Lisp, this provides the ultimate
documentation.
Help buffers describing variables or functions defined in Lisp
normally have hyperlinks to the Lisp definition, if you have the Lisp
source files installed. If you know Lisp, this provides the ultimate
documentation. If you don't know Lisp, you should learn it. If you
are treating Emacs as an object file, then you are just @emph{using}
Emacs. For real intimacy with Emacs, you must read the source code.
@node Apropos
@section Apropos
......
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