Commit aa3dd3b5 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Moving Point): C-e now runs move-end-of-line.

(Undo): Doc undo-outer-limit.
parent ccd35a78
......@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ them). Others do more sophisticated things.
@kindex UP
@kindex DOWN
@findex beginning-of-line
@findex end-of-line
@findex move-end-of-line
@findex forward-char
@findex backward-char
@findex next-line
......@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ them). Others do more sophisticated things.
@item C-a
Move to the beginning of the line (@code{beginning-of-line}).
@item C-e
Move to the end of the line (@code{end-of-line}).
Move to the end of the line (@code{move-end-of-line}).
@item C-f
Move forward one character (@code{forward-char}). The right-arrow key
does the same thing.
......@@ -380,24 +380,32 @@ mark ring (@pxref{Mark Ring}).
@vindex undo-limit
@vindex undo-strong-limit
@vindex undo-outer-limit
@cindex undo limit
When the undo information for a buffer becomes too large, Emacs
discards the oldest undo information from time to time (during garbage
collection). You can specify how much undo information to keep by
setting two variables: @code{undo-limit} and @code{undo-strong-limit}.
Their values are expressed in units of bytes of space.
setting three variables: @code{undo-limit}, @code{undo-strong-limit},
and @code{undo-outer-limit}. Their values are expressed in units of
bytes of space.
The variable @code{undo-limit} sets a soft limit: Emacs keeps undo
data for enough commands to reach this size, and perhaps exceed it, but
does not keep data for any earlier commands beyond that. Its default
value is 20000. The variable @code{undo-strong-limit} sets a stricter
limit: the command which pushes the size past this amount is itself
forgotten. Its default value is 30000.
Regardless of the values of those variables, the most recent change is
never discarded, so there is no danger that garbage collection occurring
right after an unintentional large change might prevent you from undoing
it.
data for enough commands to reach this size, and perhaps exceed it,
but does not keep data for any earlier commands beyond that. Its
default value is 20000. The variable @code{undo-strong-limit} sets a
stricter limit: a previous command (not the most recent one) which
pushes the size past this amount is itself forgotten. The default
value of @code{undo-strong-limit} is 30000.
Regardless of the values of those variables, the most recent change
is never discarded unless it gets bigger than @code{undo-outer-limit}
(normally 300,000). At that point, Emacs asks whether to discard the
undo information even for the current command. (You also have the
option of quitting.) So there is normally no danger that garbage
collection occurring right after an unintentional large change might
prevent you from undoing it. But if you didn't expect the command
to create such large undo data, you can get rid of it and prevent
Emacs from running out of memory.
The reason the @code{undo} command has two keys, @kbd{C-x u} and
@kbd{C-_}, set up to run it is that it is worthy of a single-character
......
Markdown is supported
0% or .
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment