Commit ab7c5459 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

"Graphical display", not window system.

parent cd6cd82a
......@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ the rightmost column indicates a line that ``wraps'' onto the next line,
which is also called @dfn{continuing} the line. (The display table can
specify alternative indicators; see @ref{Display Tables}.)
On a window system display, the @samp{$} and @samp{\} indicators are
On a graphical display, the @samp{$} and @samp{\} indicators are
replaced with arrow images displayed in the window fringes
(@pxref{Fringes}).
......@@ -1651,13 +1651,13 @@ parts of Emacs text.
However, if the variable @code{default-line-spacing} is
non-@code{nil}, it overrides the frame's @code{line-spacing}
parameter. An integer value specifies the number of pixels put below
lines on window systems. A floating point number specifies the
lines on graphical displays. A floating point number specifies the
spacing relative to the frame's default line height.
@vindex line-spacing
You can specify the line spacing for all lines in a buffer via the
buffer-local @code{line-spacing} variable. An integer value specifies
the number of pixels put below lines on window systems. A floating
the number of pixels put below lines on graphical displays. A floating
point number specifies the spacing relative to the default frame line
height. This overrides line spacings specified for the frame.
......@@ -4603,9 +4603,9 @@ command @code{tab-to-tab-stop}. @xref{Indent Tabs}.
@tindex indicate-empty-lines
@cindex fringes, and empty line indication
When this is non-@code{nil}, Emacs displays a special glyph in the
fringe of each empty line at the end of the buffer, on terminals that
support it (window systems). @xref{Fringes}.
This variable is automatically buffer-local in every buffer.
fringe of each empty line at the end of the buffer, on graphical
displays. @xref{Fringes}. This variable is automatically
buffer-local in every buffer.
@end defopt
@defvar indicate-buffer-boundaries
......@@ -4854,7 +4854,7 @@ on character terminals. On graphical displays, all glyphs are simple.
@item @var{string}
Send the characters in @var{string} to the terminal to output
this glyph. This alternative is available on character terminals,
but not under a window system.
but not on graphical displays.
@item @var{integer}
Define this glyph code as an alias for glyph code @var{integer}. You
......@@ -4896,7 +4896,7 @@ This is a synonym for @code{ding}.
@defopt visible-bell
This variable determines whether Emacs should flash the screen to
represent a bell. Non-@code{nil} means yes, @code{nil} means no. This
is effective on a window system, and on a character-only terminal
is effective on graphical displays, and on text-only terminals
provided the terminal's Termcap entry defines the visible bell
capability (@samp{vb}).
@end defopt
......
......@@ -125,7 +125,7 @@ character backwards.
should be.
Why do we say ``or it should be''? When Emacs starts up using a
window system, it determines automatically which key or keys should be
graphical display, it determines automatically which key or keys should be
equivalent to @key{DEL}. As a result, @key{BACKSPACE} and/or @key{DELETE}
keys normally do the right things. But in some unusual cases Emacs
gets the wrong information from the system. If these keys don't do
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ them into Emacs.
@cindex Delete Selection mode
@cindex mode, Delete Selection
@findex delete-selection-mode
Many window systems follow the convention that insertion while text
Many graphical applications follow the convention that insertion while text
is selected deletes the selected text. You can make Emacs behave this
way by enabling Delete Selection mode---with @kbd{M-x
delete-selection-mode} or using Custom. Another effect of this mode
......
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