Commit ad800164 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Replace @sc{foo} with @acronym{FOO}.

parent 64d4923e
......@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ and background colors, so you cannot specify different colors for
the scroll bars.
@item
For simplicity, all @sc{ascii} characters now have the same height and width.
For simplicity, all @acronym{ASCII} characters now have the same height and width.
(Certain characters, such as Chinese characters, always have twice
the standard width.) All characters are created equal.
......
......@@ -633,7 +633,7 @@ work that was otherwise lost. The @code{recover-session} command uses
this file to find them.
The default name for this file specifies your home directory and starts
with @samp{.saves-}. It also contains the Emacs process @sc{id} and the
with @samp{.saves-}. It also contains the Emacs process @acronym{ID} and the
host name.
@end defvar
......
......@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ You can use @samp{e} more than once in a single command's interactive
specification. If the key sequence that invoked the command has
@var{n} events that are lists, the @var{n}th @samp{e} provides the
@var{n}th such event. Events that are not lists, such as function keys
and @sc{ascii} characters, do not count where @samp{e} is concerned.
and @acronym{ASCII} characters, do not count where @samp{e} is concerned.
@item f
A file name of an existing file (@pxref{File Names}). The default
......@@ -797,7 +797,7 @@ last-command-event
@end example
@noindent
The value is 5 because that is the @sc{ascii} code for @kbd{C-e}.
The value is 5 because that is the @acronym{ASCII} code for @kbd{C-e}.
The alias @code{last-command-char} exists for compatibility with
Emacs version 18.
......@@ -916,14 +916,14 @@ The
@ifnottex
2**26
@end ifnottex
bit in the character code indicates a non-@sc{ascii}
bit in the character code indicates a non-@acronym{ASCII}
control character.
@sc{ascii} control characters such as @kbd{C-a} have special basic
codes of their own, so Emacs needs no special bit to indicate them.
Thus, the code for @kbd{C-a} is just 1.
But if you type a control combination not in @sc{ascii}, such as
But if you type a control combination not in @acronym{ASCII}, such as
@kbd{%} with the control key, the numeric value you get is the code
for @kbd{%} plus
@tex
......@@ -932,7 +932,7 @@ for @kbd{%} plus
@ifnottex
2**26
@end ifnottex
(assuming the terminal supports non-@sc{ascii}
(assuming the terminal supports non-@acronym{ASCII}
control characters).
@item shift
......@@ -943,13 +943,13 @@ The
@ifnottex
2**25
@end ifnottex
bit in the character code indicates an @sc{ascii} control
bit in the character code indicates an @acronym{ASCII} control
character typed with the shift key held down.
For letters, the basic code itself indicates upper versus lower case;
for digits and punctuation, the shift key selects an entirely different
character with a different basic code. In order to keep within the
@sc{ascii} character set whenever possible, Emacs avoids using the
@acronym{ASCII} character set whenever possible, Emacs avoids using the
@tex
@math{2^{25}}
@end tex
......@@ -958,7 +958,7 @@ character with a different basic code. In order to keep within the
@end ifnottex
bit for those characters.
However, @sc{ascii} provides no way to distinguish @kbd{C-A} from
However, @acronym{ASCII} provides no way to distinguish @kbd{C-A} from
@kbd{C-a}, so Emacs uses the
@tex
@math{2^{25}}
......@@ -1032,10 +1032,10 @@ function keys:
@table @asis
@item @code{backspace}, @code{tab}, @code{newline}, @code{return}, @code{delete}
These keys correspond to common @sc{ascii} control characters that have
These keys correspond to common @acronym{ASCII} control characters that have
special keys on most keyboards.
In @sc{ascii}, @kbd{C-i} and @key{TAB} are the same character. If the
In @acronym{ASCII}, @kbd{C-i} and @key{TAB} are the same character. If the
terminal can distinguish between them, Emacs conveys the distinction to
Lisp programs by representing the former as the integer 9, and the
latter as the symbol @code{tab}.
......@@ -1047,7 +1047,7 @@ character @kbd{C-i}) also applies to @code{tab}. Likewise for the other
symbols in this group. The function @code{read-char} likewise converts
these events into characters.
In @sc{ascii}, @key{BS} is really @kbd{C-h}. But @code{backspace}
In @acronym{ASCII}, @key{BS} is really @kbd{C-h}. But @code{backspace}
converts into the character code 127 (@key{DEL}), not into code 8
(@key{BS}). This is what most users prefer.
......@@ -1096,7 +1096,7 @@ arguments to the key-binding lookup and modification functions.
Emacs supports four kinds of mouse events: click events, drag events,
button-down events, and motion events. All mouse events are represented
as lists. The @sc{car} of the list is the event type; this says which
as lists. The @acronym{CAR} of the list is the event type; this says which
mouse button was involved, and which modifier keys were used with it.
The event type can also distinguish double or triple button presses
(@pxref{Repeat Events}). The rest of the list elements give position
......@@ -1521,7 +1521,7 @@ into another window. That produces a pair of events like these:
key binding purposes. For a keyboard event, the event type equals the
event value; thus, the event type for a character is the character, and
the event type for a function key symbol is the symbol itself. For
events that are lists, the event type is the symbol in the @sc{car} of
events that are lists, the event type is the symbol in the @acronym{CAR} of
the list. Thus, the event type is always a symbol or a character.
Two events of the same type are equivalent where key bindings are
......@@ -1810,7 +1810,7 @@ bit, resulting in a value between 128 and 255. Only a unibyte string
can include these codes.
@item
Non-@sc{ascii} characters above 256 can be included in a multibyte string.
Non-@acronym{ASCII} characters above 256 can be included in a multibyte string.
@item
Other keyboard character events cannot fit in a string. This includes
......@@ -1979,7 +1979,7 @@ Echo Area}.
If @var{inherit-input-method} is non-@code{nil}, then the current input
method (if any) is employed to make it possible to enter a
non-@sc{ascii} character. Otherwise, input method handling is disabled
non-@acronym{ASCII} character. Otherwise, input method handling is disabled
for reading this event.
If @code{cursor-in-echo-area} is non-@code{nil}, then @code{read-event}
......@@ -2009,7 +2009,7 @@ user generates an event which is not a character (i.e. a mouse click or
function key event), @code{read-char} signals an error. The arguments
work as in @code{read-event}.
In the first example, the user types the character @kbd{1} (@sc{ascii}
In the first example, the user types the character @kbd{1} (@acronym{ASCII}
code 49). The second example shows a keyboard macro definition that
calls @code{read-char} from the minibuffer using @code{eval-expression}.
@code{read-char} reads the keyboard macro's very next character, which
......@@ -2189,7 +2189,7 @@ This variable records the last terminal input event read, whether
as part of a command or explicitly by a Lisp program.
In the example below, the Lisp program reads the character @kbd{1},
@sc{ascii} code 49. It becomes the value of @code{last-input-event},
@acronym{ASCII} code 49. It becomes the value of @code{last-input-event},
while @kbd{C-e} (we assume @kbd{C-x C-e} command is used to evaluate
this expression) remains the value of @code{last-command-event}.
......@@ -2513,7 +2513,7 @@ This function returns the numeric meaning of a valid raw prefix argument
value, @var{arg}. The argument may be a symbol, a number, or a list.
If it is @code{nil}, the value 1 is returned; if it is @code{-}, the
value @minus{}1 is returned; if it is a number, that number is returned;
if it is a list, the @sc{car} of that list (which should be a number) is
if it is a list, the @acronym{CAR} of that list (which should be a number) is
returned.
@end defun
......
......@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ Like @code{custom-manual} except that the link appears
in the customization buffer with the Info node name.
@item (url-link @var{url})
Link to a web page; @var{url} is a string which specifies the @sc{url}.
Link to a web page; @var{url} is a string which specifies the @acronym{URL}.
The link appears in the customization buffer as @var{url}.
@item (emacs-commentary-link @var{library})
......
......@@ -2414,7 +2414,7 @@ times in the specification string.
For the remaining character sets, those that you don't specify
explicitly, Emacs chooses a font based on @var{fontpattern}: it replaces
@samp{fontset-@var{alias}} with a value that names one character set.
For the @sc{ascii} character set, @samp{fontset-@var{alias}} is replaced
For the @acronym{ASCII} character set, @samp{fontset-@var{alias}} is replaced
with @samp{ISO8859-1}.
In addition, when several consecutive fields are wildcards, Emacs
......@@ -2430,7 +2430,7 @@ better to use the smaller font in its own size, which Emacs does.
@end example
@noindent
the font specification for @sc{ascii} characters would be this:
the font specification for @acronym{ASCII} characters would be this:
@example
-*-fixed-medium-r-normal-*-24-*-ISO8859-1
......@@ -3476,19 +3476,19 @@ Character code 10 is a newline.
All other codes in the range 0 through 31, and code 127, display in one
of two ways according to the value of @code{ctl-arrow}. If it is
non-@code{nil}, these codes map to sequences of two glyphs, where the
first glyph is the @sc{ascii} code for @samp{^}. (A display table can
first glyph is the @acronym{ASCII} code for @samp{^}. (A display table can
specify a glyph to use instead of @samp{^}.) Otherwise, these codes map
just like the codes in the range 128 to 255.
On MS-DOS terminals, Emacs arranges by default for the character code
127 to be mapped to the glyph code 127, which normally displays as an
empty polygon. This glyph is used to display non-@sc{ascii} characters
empty polygon. This glyph is used to display non-@acronym{ASCII} characters
that the MS-DOS terminal doesn't support. @xref{MS-DOS and MULE,,,
emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}.
@item
Character codes 128 through 255 map to sequences of four glyphs, where
the first glyph is the @sc{ascii} code for @samp{\}, and the others are
the first glyph is the @acronym{ASCII} code for @samp{\}, and the others are
digit characters representing the character code in octal. (A display
table can specify a glyph to use instead of @samp{\}.)
......@@ -3551,7 +3551,7 @@ independent of the user-settable tab stops used by the command
@cindex display table
You can use the @dfn{display table} feature to control how all possible
character codes display on the screen. This is useful for displaying
European languages that have letters not in the @sc{ascii} character
European languages that have letters not in the @acronym{ASCII} character
set.
The display table maps each character code into a sequence of
......
......@@ -993,7 +993,7 @@ then the file is executable by all users, if the second-lowest-order bit
is 1, then the file is writable by all users, etc.
The highest value returnable is 4095 (7777 octal), meaning that
everyone has read, write, and execute permission, that the @sc{suid} bit
everyone has read, write, and execute permission, that the @acronym{SUID} bit
is set for both others and group, and that the sticky bit is set.
@example
......@@ -1066,10 +1066,10 @@ links, can be created by using the @code{add-name-to-file} function
(@pxref{Changing Files}).
@item
The file's @sc{uid}.
The file's @acronym{UID}.
@item
The file's @sc{gid}.
The file's @acronym{GID}.
@item
The time of last access, as a list of two integers.
......@@ -1092,7 +1092,7 @@ The file's modes, as a string of ten letters or dashes,
as in @samp{ls -l}.
@item
@code{t} if the file's @sc{gid} would change if file were
@code{t} if the file's @acronym{GID} would change if file were
deleted and recreated; @code{nil} otherwise.
@item
......@@ -1136,10 +1136,10 @@ has only one name (the name @file{files.texi} in the current default
directory).
@item 2235
is owned by the user with @sc{uid} 2235.
is owned by the user with @acronym{UID} 2235.
@item 75
is in the group with @sc{gid} 75.
is in the group with @acronym{GID} 75.
@item (8489 20284)
was last accessed on Aug 19 00:09.
......@@ -1158,7 +1158,7 @@ if some of the bytes belong to multibyte sequences.)
has a mode of read and write access for the owner, group, and world.
@item nil
would retain the same @sc{gid} if it were recreated.
would retain the same @acronym{GID} if it were recreated.
@item 129500
has an inode number of 129500.
......
......@@ -1388,7 +1388,7 @@ A function called whenever the process receives a signal, or @code{nil}.
The associated buffer of the process.
@item pid
An integer, the Unix process @sc{id}.
An integer, the Unix process @acronym{ID}.
@item childp
A flag, non-@code{nil} if this is really a child process.
......@@ -1418,7 +1418,7 @@ needs to be reported, either by running the sentinel or by inserting a
message in the process buffer.
@item pty_flag
Non-@code{nil} if communication with the subprocess uses a @sc{pty};
Non-@code{nil} if communication with the subprocess uses a @acronym{PTY};
@code{nil} if it uses a pipe.
@item infd
......
......@@ -231,9 +231,9 @@ satisfies @code{keymapp}.
@defun make-keymap &optional prompt
This function creates and returns a new full keymap. That keymap
contains a char-table (@pxref{Char-Tables}) with 384 slots: the first
128 slots are for defining all the @sc{ascii} characters, the next 128
128 slots are for defining all the @acronym{ASCII} characters, the next 128
slots are for 8-bit European characters, and each one of the final 128
slots is for one character set of non-@sc{ascii} characters supported by
slots is for one character set of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters supported by
Emacs. The new keymap initially binds all these characters to
@code{nil}, and does not bind any other kind of event.
......@@ -593,7 +593,7 @@ other.
This function returns the current buffer's local keymap, or @code{nil}
if it has none. In the following example, the keymap for the
@samp{*scratch*} buffer (using Lisp Interaction mode) is a sparse keymap
in which the entry for @key{ESC}, @sc{ascii} code 27, is another sparse
in which the entry for @key{ESC}, @acronym{ASCII} code 27, is another sparse
keymap.
@example
......@@ -999,7 +999,7 @@ This variable is the meta-prefix character code. It is used when
translating a meta character to a two-character sequence so it can be
looked up in a keymap. For useful results, the value should be a prefix
event (@pxref{Prefix Keys}). The default value is 27, which is the
@sc{ascii} code for @key{ESC}.
@acronym{ASCII} code for @key{ESC}.
As long as the value of @code{meta-prefix-char} remains 27, key lookup
translates @kbd{M-b} into @kbd{@key{ESC} b}, which is normally defined
......@@ -1361,8 +1361,8 @@ redefines @kbd{C-x C-\} to move down a line.
redefines the first (leftmost) mouse button, typed with the Meta key, to
set point where you click.
@cindex non-@sc{ascii} text in keybindings
Be careful when using non-@sc{ascii} text characters in Lisp
@cindex non-@acronym{ASCII} text in keybindings
Be careful when using non-@acronym{ASCII} text characters in Lisp
specifications of keys to bind. If these are read as multibyte text, as
they usually will be in a Lisp file (@pxref{Loading Non-ASCII}), you
must type the keys as multibyte too. For instance, if you use this:
......@@ -1576,7 +1576,7 @@ If @var{firstonly} is @code{non-ascii}, then the value is a single
string representing the first key sequence found, rather than a list of
all possible key sequences. If @var{firstonly} is @code{t}, then the
value is the first key sequence, except that key sequences consisting
entirely of @sc{ascii} characters (or meta variants of @sc{ascii}
entirely of @acronym{ASCII} characters (or meta variants of @acronym{ASCII}
characters) are preferred to all other key sequences.
If @var{noindirect} is non-@code{nil}, @code{where-is-internal} doesn't
......@@ -1609,13 +1609,13 @@ listing includes only keys that start with @var{prefix}.
The listing describes meta characters as @key{ESC} followed by the
corresponding non-meta character.
When several characters with consecutive @sc{ascii} codes have the
When several characters with consecutive @acronym{ASCII} codes have the
same definition, they are shown together, as
@samp{@var{firstchar}..@var{lastchar}}. In this instance, you need to
know the @sc{ascii} codes to understand which characters this means.
know the @acronym{ASCII} codes to understand which characters this means.
For example, in the default global map, the characters @samp{@key{SPC}
..@: ~} are described by a single line. @key{SPC} is @sc{ascii} 32,
@kbd{~} is @sc{ascii} 126, and the characters between them include all
..@: ~} are described by a single line. @key{SPC} is @acronym{ASCII} 32,
@kbd{~} is @acronym{ASCII} 126, and the characters between them include all
the normal printing characters, (e.g., letters, digits, punctuation,
etc.@:); all these characters are bound to @code{self-insert-command}.
@end deffn
......@@ -1695,7 +1695,7 @@ looks like this:
The @sc{car}, @var{item-string}, is the string to be displayed in the
menu. It should be short---preferably one to three words. It should
describe the action of the command it corresponds to. Note that it is
not generally possible to display non-ASCII text in menus. It will
not generally possible to display non-@acronym{ASCII} text in menus. It will
work for keyboard menus and will work to a large extent when Emacs is
built with Gtk+ support.@footnote{In this case, the text is first
encoded using the @code{utf-8} coding system and then rendered by the
......
......@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ containing Lisp code.
@menu
* How Programs Do Loading:: The @code{load} function and others.
* Library Search:: Finding a library to load.
* Loading Non-ASCII:: Non-@sc{ascii} characters in Emacs Lisp files.
* Loading Non-ASCII:: Non-@acronym{ASCII} characters in Emacs Lisp files.
* Autoload:: Setting up a function to autoload.
* Repeated Loading:: Precautions about loading a file twice.
* Named Features:: Loading a library if it isn't already loaded.
......@@ -293,9 +293,9 @@ try adding to the specified file name. The default value is
@end defvar
@node Loading Non-ASCII
@section Loading Non-@sc{ascii} Characters
@section Loading Non-@acronym{ASCII} Characters
When Emacs Lisp programs contain string constants with non-@sc{ascii}
When Emacs Lisp programs contain string constants with non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters, these can be represented within Emacs either as unibyte
strings or as multibyte strings (@pxref{Text Representations}). Which
representation is used depends on how the file is read into Emacs. If
......@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ unibyte text, and its string constants will be unibyte strings.
To make the results more predictable, Emacs always performs decoding
into the multibyte representation when loading Lisp files, even if it
was started with the @samp{--unibyte} option. This means that string
constants with non-@sc{ascii} characters translate into multibyte
constants with non-@acronym{ASCII} characters translate into multibyte
strings. The only exception is when a particular file specifies no
decoding.
......@@ -321,7 +321,7 @@ notice whether the user prefers unibyte or multibyte text, by checking
@code{default-enable-multibyte-characters}, and convert representations
appropriately.
In most Emacs Lisp programs, the fact that non-@sc{ascii} strings are
In most Emacs Lisp programs, the fact that non-@acronym{ASCII} strings are
multibyte strings should not be noticeable, since inserting them in
unibyte buffers converts them to unibyte automatically. However, if
this does make a difference, you can force a particular Lisp file to be
......@@ -329,7 +329,7 @@ interpreted as unibyte by writing @samp{-*-unibyte: t;-*-} in a
comment on the file's first line. With that designator, the file will
unconditionally be interpreted as unibyte, even in an ordinary
multibyte Emacs session. This can matter when making keybindings to
non-@sc{ascii} characters written as @code{?v@var{literal}}.
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters written as @code{?v@var{literal}}.
@node Autoload
@section Autoload
......
......@@ -423,7 +423,7 @@ correspondingly more complicated. Here are excerpts from
@group
;; @r{Set syntax of chars up to 0 to class of chars that are}
;; @r{part of symbol names but not words.}
;; @r{(The number 0 is @code{48} in the @sc{ascii} character set.)}
;; @r{(The number 0 is @code{48} in the @acronym{ASCII} character set.)}
(while (< i ?0)
(modify-syntax-entry i "_ " emacs-lisp-mode-syntax-table)
(setq i (1+ i)))
......
......@@ -4,11 +4,11 @@
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../info/characters
@node Non-ASCII Characters, Searching and Matching, Text, Top
@chapter Non-@sc{ascii} Characters
@chapter Non-@acronym{ASCII} Characters
@cindex multibyte characters
@cindex non-@sc{ascii} characters
@cindex non-@acronym{ASCII} characters
This chapter covers the special issues relating to non-@sc{ascii}
This chapter covers the special issues relating to non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters and how they are stored in strings and buffers.
@menu
......@@ -44,8 +44,8 @@ attention to the difference.
@cindex unibyte text
In unibyte representation, each character occupies one byte and
therefore the possible character codes range from 0 to 255. Codes 0
through 127 are @sc{ascii} characters; the codes from 128 through 255
are used for one non-@sc{ascii} character set (you can choose which
through 127 are @acronym{ASCII} characters; the codes from 128 through 255
are used for one non-@acronym{ASCII} character set (you can choose which
character set by setting the variable @code{nonascii-insert-offset}).
@cindex leading code
......@@ -134,14 +134,14 @@ alternative, to convert the buffer contents to multibyte, is not
acceptable because the buffer's representation is a choice made by the
user that cannot be overridden automatically.
Converting unibyte text to multibyte text leaves @sc{ascii} characters
Converting unibyte text to multibyte text leaves @acronym{ASCII} characters
unchanged, and likewise character codes 128 through 159. It converts
the non-@sc{ascii} codes 160 through 255 by adding the value
the non-@acronym{ASCII} codes 160 through 255 by adding the value
@code{nonascii-insert-offset} to each character code. By setting this
variable, you specify which character set the unibyte characters
correspond to (@pxref{Character Sets}). For example, if
@code{nonascii-insert-offset} is 2048, which is @code{(- (make-char
'latin-iso8859-1) 128)}, then the unibyte non-@sc{ascii} characters
'latin-iso8859-1) 128)}, then the unibyte non-@acronym{ASCII} characters
correspond to Latin 1. If it is 2688, which is @code{(- (make-char
'greek-iso8859-7) 128)}, then they correspond to Greek letters.
......@@ -153,10 +153,10 @@ text to multibyte and back to unibyte reproduces the original unibyte
text.
@defvar nonascii-insert-offset
This variable specifies the amount to add to a non-@sc{ascii} character
This variable specifies the amount to add to a non-@acronym{ASCII} character
when converting unibyte text to multibyte. It also applies when
@code{self-insert-command} inserts a character in the unibyte
non-@sc{ascii} range, 128 through 255. However, the functions
non-@acronym{ASCII} range, 128 through 255. However, the functions
@code{insert} and @code{insert-char} do not perform this conversion.
The right value to use to select character set @var{cs} is @code{(-
......@@ -263,7 +263,7 @@ codes for multibyte representation range from 0 to 524287, but not all
values in that range are valid. The values 128 through 255 are not
entirely proper in multibyte text, but they can occur if you do explicit
encoding and decoding (@pxref{Explicit Encoding}). Some other character
codes cannot occur at all in multibyte text. Only the @sc{ascii} codes
codes cannot occur at all in multibyte text. Only the @acronym{ASCII} codes
0 through 127 are completely legitimate in both representations.
@defun char-valid-p charcode &optional genericp
......@@ -301,8 +301,8 @@ into several character sets. For example, one set of Chinese
characters, generally known as Big 5, is divided into two Emacs
character sets, @code{chinese-big5-1} and @code{chinese-big5-2}.
@sc{ascii} characters are in character set @code{ascii}. The
non-@sc{ascii} characters 128 through 159 are in character set
@acronym{ASCII} characters are in character set @code{ascii}. The
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters 128 through 159 are in character set
@code{eight-bit-control}, and codes 160 through 255 are in character set
@code{eight-bit-graphic}.
......@@ -336,8 +336,8 @@ special purposes within Emacs.
@cindex dimension (of character set)
In multibyte representation, each character occupies one or more
bytes. Each character set has an @dfn{introduction sequence}, which is
normally one or two bytes long. (Exception: the @sc{ascii} character
set and the @sc{eight-bit-graphic} character set have a zero-length
normally one or two bytes long. (Exception: the @code{ascii} character
set and the @code{eight-bit-graphic} character set have a zero-length
introduction sequence.) The introduction sequence is the beginning of
the byte sequence for any character in the character set. The rest of
the character's bytes distinguish it from the other characters in the
......@@ -426,8 +426,8 @@ For example:
@result{} (latin-iso8859-1 0)
@end example
The character sets @sc{ascii}, @sc{eight-bit-control}, and
@sc{eight-bit-graphic} don't have corresponding generic characters. If
The character sets @code{ascii}, @code{eight-bit-control}, and
@code{eight-bit-graphic} don't have corresponding generic characters. If
@var{charset} is one of them and you don't supply @var{code1},
@code{make-char} returns the character code corresponding to the
smallest code in @var{charset}.
......@@ -744,7 +744,7 @@ decreasing priority. But if @var{highest} is non-@code{nil}, then the
return value is just one coding system, the one that is highest in
priority.
If the region contains only @sc{ascii} characters, the value
If the region contains only @acronym{ASCII} characters, the value
is @code{undecided} or @code{(undecided)}.
@end defun
......@@ -846,12 +846,12 @@ reading and writing particular files. Each element has the form
expression that matches certain file names. The element applies to file
names that match @var{pattern}.
The @sc{cdr} of the element, @var{coding}, should be either a coding
The @acronym{CDR} of the element, @var{coding}, should be either a coding
system, a cons cell containing two coding systems, or a function name (a
symbol with a function definition). If @var{coding} is a coding system,
that coding system is used for both reading the file and writing it. If
@var{coding} is a cons cell containing two coding systems, its @sc{car}
specifies the coding system for decoding, and its @sc{cdr} specifies the
@var{coding} is a cons cell containing two coding systems, its @acronym{CAR}
specifies the coding system for decoding, and its @acronym{cdr} specifies the
coding system for encoding.
If @var{coding} is a function name, the function must return a coding
......@@ -975,7 +975,7 @@ of the right way to use the variable:
@example
;; @r{Read the file with no character code conversion.}
;; @r{Assume @sc{crlf} represents end-of-line.}
;; @r{Assume @acronym{crlf} represents end-of-line.}
(let ((coding-system-for-write 'emacs-mule-dos))
(insert-file-contents filename))
@end example
......@@ -1175,9 +1175,9 @@ from the file contents, in the usual Emacs fashion.
@section Input Methods
@cindex input methods
@dfn{Input methods} provide convenient ways of entering non-@sc{ascii}
@dfn{Input methods} provide convenient ways of entering non-@acronym{ASCII}
characters from the keyboard. Unlike coding systems, which translate
non-@sc{ascii} characters to and from encodings meant to be read by
non-@acronym{ASCII} characters to and from encodings meant to be read by
programs, input methods provide human-friendly commands. (@xref{Input
Methods,,, emacs, The GNU Emacs Manual}, for information on how users
use input methods to enter text.) How to define input methods is not
......
......@@ -163,12 +163,12 @@ example, @samp{1500.0}, @samp{15e2}, @samp{15.0e2}, @samp{1.5e3}, and
value is 1500. They are all equivalent. You can also use a minus sign
to write negative floating point numbers, as in @samp{-1.0}.
@cindex IEEE floating point
@cindex @acronym{IEEE} floating point
@cindex positive infinity
@cindex negative infinity
@cindex infinity
@cindex NaN
Most modern computers support the IEEE floating point standard, which
Most modern computers support the @acronym{IEEE} floating point standard, which
provides for positive infinity and negative infinity as floating point
values. It also provides for a class of values called NaN or
``not-a-number''; numerical functions return such values in cases where
......@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ these special floating point values:
@end table
In addition, the value @code{-0.0} is distinguishable from ordinary
zero in IEEE floating point (although @code{equal} and @code{=} consider
zero in @acronym{IEEE} floating point (although @code{equal} and @code{=} consider
them equal values).
You can use @code{logb} to extract the binary exponent of a floating
......@@ -565,7 +565,7 @@ machines round in the standard fashion.
@cindex @code{arith-error} in division
If you divide an integer by 0, an @code{arith-error} error is signaled.
(@xref{Errors}.) Floating point division by zero returns either
infinity or a NaN if your machine supports IEEE floating point;
infinity or a NaN if your machine supports @acronym{IEEE} floating point;
otherwise, it signals an @code{arith-error} error.
@example
......@@ -1166,7 +1166,7 @@ repeatability is helpful for debugging.
If you want random numbers that don't always come out the same, execute
@code{(random t)}. This chooses a new seed based on the current time of
day and on Emacs's process @sc{id} number.
day and on Emacs's process @acronym{ID} number.
@defun random &optional limit
This function returns a pseudo-random integer. Repeated calls return a
......@@ -1176,7 +1176,7 @@ If @var{limit} is a positive integer, the value is chosen to be
nonnegative and less than @var{limit}.
If @var{limit} is @code{t}, it means to choose a new seed based on the
current time of day and on Emacs's process @sc{id} number.
current time of day and on Emacs's process @acronym{ID} number.
@c "Emacs'" is incorrect usage!
On some machines, any integer representable in Lisp may be the result
......
......@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ number whose value is 1500. They are all equivalent.
@node Character Type
@subsection Character Type
@cindex @sc{ascii} character codes
@cindex @acronym{ASCII} character codes
A @dfn{character} in Emacs Lisp is nothing more than an integer. In
other words, characters are represented by their character codes. For
......@@ -228,8 +228,8 @@ characters. @xref{String Type}.
Characters in strings, buffers, and files are currently limited to the
range of 0 to 524287---nineteen bits. But not all values in that range
are valid character codes. Codes 0 through 127 are @sc{ascii} codes; the
rest are non-@sc{ascii} (@pxref{Non-ASCII Characters}). Characters that represent
are valid character codes. Codes 0 through 127 are @acronym{ASCII} codes; the
rest are non-@acronym{ASCII} (@pxref{Non-ASCII Characters}). Characters that represent
keyboard input have a much wider range, to encode modifier keys such as
Control, Meta and Shift.
......@@ -323,9 +323,9 @@ equivalent to @samp{?\^I} and to @samp{?\^i}:
@end example
In strings and buffers, the only control characters allowed are those
that exist in @sc{ascii}; but for keyboard input purposes, you can turn
that exist in @acronym{ASCII}; but for keyboard input purposes, you can turn
any character into a control character with @samp{C-}. The character
codes for these non-@sc{ascii} control characters include the
codes for these non-@acronym{ASCII} control characters include the
@tex
@math{2^{26}}
@end tex
......@@ -333,7 +333,7 @@ codes for these non-@sc{ascii} control characters include the
2**26
@end ifnottex