Commit af372af6 authored by Dave Love's avatar Dave Love

*** empty log message ***

parent 6bfff064
1999-10-23 Dave Love <fx@gnu.org>
* elide-head.el: New file.
1999-10-23 Gerd Moellmann <gerd@gnu.org>
* Makefile (compile-files, backup-compiled-files): New targets.
......
;;; elid-head.el --- hide headers in files
;; Copyright (C) 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
;; Author: Dave Love <fx@gnu.org>
;; Keywords: outlines tools
;; This file is part of GNU Emacs.
;; GNU Emacs is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
;; it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
;; the Free Software Foundation; either version 2, or (at your option)
;; any later version.
;; GNU Emacs is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
;; but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
;; MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
;; GNU General Public License for more details.
;; You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
;; along with GNU Emacs; see the file COPYING. If not, write to the
;; Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
;; Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
;;; Commentary:
;; Functionality for eliding boilerplate text (normally copyright
;; notices) in file headers to avoid clutter when you know what it
;; says.
;;
;; `elide-head-headers-to-hide' controls what is elided by the command
;; `elide-head'. A buffer-local invisible overlay manages the
;; elision.
;; Please don't turn this on in site init files so that information
;; isn't hidden from users who may not know what it says.
;; Inspired by jwz's hide-copyleft.el, for which we don't have an
;; assignment.
;;; Code:
(defgroup elide-head nil
"Eliding copyright headers and the like in source files."
:prefix "elide-head"
:group 'tools)
(defcustom elide-head-headers-to-hide
'(("is free software; you can redistribute it" . ; GNU boilerplate
"Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA\\.")
("The Regents of the University of California\\. All rights reserved\\." .
"SUCH DAMAGE\\.") ; BSD
("Permission is hereby granted, free of charge" . ; X11
"authorization from the X Consortium\\."))
"Alist of regexps defining start end end of text to elide.
The cars of elements of the list are searched for in order. Text is
elided with an invisible overlay from the end of the line where the
first match is found to the end of the match for the corresponding
cdr."
:group 'elide-head
:type '(alist :key-type (string :tag "Start regexp")
:value-type (string :tag "End regexp")))
(defvar elide-head-overlay nil)
(make-variable-buffer-local 'elide-head-overlay)
;;;###autoload
(defun elide-head (&optional arg)
"Hide header material in buffer according to `elide-head-headers-to-hide'.
The header is made invisible with an overlay. With a prefix arg, show
an elided material again.
This is suitable as an entry on `find-file-hooks' or appropriate mode hooks."
(interactive "P")
(if arg
(elide-head-show)
(save-excursion
(save-restriction
(let ((rest elide-head-headers-to-hide)
beg end)
(widen)
(goto-char (point-min))
(while rest
(save-excursion
(when (re-search-forward (caar rest) nil t)
(setq beg (point))
(when (re-search-forward (cdar rest) nil t)
(setq end (point)
rest nil))))
(if rest (setq rest (cdr rest))))
(if (not (and beg end))
(if (interactive-p)
(error "No header found"))
(goto-char beg)
(end-of-line)
(if (overlayp elide-head-overlay)
(move-overlay elide-head-overlay (point) end)
(setq elide-head-overlay (make-overlay (point) end)))
(overlay-put elide-head-overlay 'invisible t)
(overlay-put elide-head-overlay 'intangible t)
(overlay-put elide-head-overlay 'after-string "...")))))))
(defun elide-head-show ()
"Show a header elided current buffer by \\[elide-head]."
(interactive)
(if (and (overlayp elide-head-overlay)
(overlay-buffer elide-head-overlay))
(delete-overlay elide-head-overlay)
(if (interactive-p)
(error "No header hidden"))))
(provide 'elide-head)
;;; elide-head.el ends here
1999-10-23 Dave Love <fx@gnu.org>
* autotype.texi: New file.
* Makefile.in: Use it.
1999-10-23 Paul Eggert <eggert@twinsun.com>
* mule.texi, cmdargs.texi:
......
@c This is part of the Emacs manual.
\input texinfo
@c This is an annex of the Emacs manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1994, 1995 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c Author: Daniel.Pfeiffer@Informatik.START.dbp.de, fax (+49 69) 7588-2389
@c See file emacs.texi for copying conditions.
@node Autotypist, Picture, Abbrevs, Top
@chapter Features for Automatic Typing
@cindex text
@cindex selfinserting text
@cindex autotypist
@setfilename ../info/autotype
@c @node Autotypist, Picture, Abbrevs, Top
@c @chapter Features for Automatic Typing
@settitle Features for Automatic Typing
@c @cindex text
@c @cindex selfinserting text
@c @cindex autotypist
@dircategory Editors
@direntry
......@@ -14,11 +17,36 @@
in Emacs.
@end direntry
@ifinfo
Copyright @copyright{} 1994, 1995, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@end ifinfo
@titlepage
@sp 10
@center @titlefont{Autotyping}
@sp 2
@center @subtitlefont{Convenient features for text that you enter
frequently in Emacs}
@sp 2
@center Daniel Pfeiffer
@center additions by Dave Love
@page
@vskip 0pt plus 1filll
Copyright @copyright{} 1994, 1995, 1999 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@end titlepage
@node Top
@top Autotyping
Under certain circumstances you will find yourself typing similar things
over and over again. This is especially true of form letters and programming
language constructs. Project-specific header comments, flow-control
constructs or magic numbers are essentially the same every time. Emacs has
various features for doing tedious and repetitive typing chores for you.
various features for doing tedious and repetitive typing chores for you
in addition to the Abbrev features (@pxref{(emacs)Abbrevs}).
One solution is using skeletons, flexible rules that say what to
insert, and how to do it. Various programming language modes offer some
......@@ -30,23 +58,38 @@ depending on the file-name or the mode as appropriate. You can have a file or
a skeleton inserted, or you can call a function. Then there is the
possibility to have Un*x interpreter scripts automatically take on a magic
number and be executable as soon as they are saved. Or you can have a
copyright notice's year updated, if necessary, every time you save a file.
copyright notice's year updated, if necessary, every time you save a
file. Similarly for time stamps in the file.
URLs can be inserted based on a word at point. Flexible templates can
be defined for inserting and navigating between text more generally. A
sort of meta-expansion facility can be used to try a set of alternative
completions and expansions of text at point.
@menu
* Using Skeletons:: How to insert a skeleton into your text.
* Wrapping Skeletons:: Putting existing text within a skeleton.
* Skeletons as Abbrevs:: An alternative for issuing skeleton commands.
* Skeleton Language:: Making skeleton commands insert what you want.
* Inserting Pairs:: Typing one character and getting another after point.
* Inserting Pairs:: Typing one character and getting another
after point.
* Autoinserting:: Filling up empty files as soon as you visit them.
* Copyrights:: Inserting and updating copyrights.
* Executables:: Turning interpreter scripts into executables.
* Timestamps:: Updating dates and times in modified files.
* QuickURL:: Inserting URLs based on text at point.
* Tempo:: Flexible template insertion.
* Hippie Expand:: Expansion of text trying various methods.
* Concept Index::
* Command Index::
* Variable Index::
@end menu
@node Using Skeletons
@section Using Skeletons
@chapter Using Skeletons
@cindex skeletons
@cindex using skeletons
......@@ -54,9 +97,10 @@ copyright notice's year updated, if necessary, every time you save a file.
programming language you are using, skeletons are a means of accomplishing
this. Normally skeletons each have a command of their own, that, when called,
will insert the skeleton. These commands can be issued in the usual ways
(@xref{Commands}). Modes that offer various skeletons will often bind these
to key-sequences on the @kbd{C-c} prefix, as well as having an @cite{Insert}
menu and maybe even predefined abbrevs for them (@xref{Skeletons as Abbrevs}).
(@xref{(emacs)Commands}). Modes that offer various skeletons will often
bind these to key-sequences on the @kbd{C-c} prefix, as well as having
an @cite{Insert} menu and maybe even predefined abbrevs for them
(@xref{Skeletons as Abbrevs}).
The simplest kind of skeleton will simply insert some text indented
according to the major mode and leave the cursor at a likely place in the
......@@ -75,7 +119,7 @@ termination still gets inserted.
@node Wrapping Skeletons
@section Wrapping Skeletons Around Existing Test
@chapter Wrapping Skeletons Around Existing Text
@cindex wrapping skeletons
Often you will find yourself with some code that for whatever reason
......@@ -85,18 +129,18 @@ accomplishing this, and can even, in the case of programming languages,
reindent the wrapped code for you.
Skeleton commands take an optional numeric prefix argument
(@xref{Arguments}). This is interpreted in two different ways depending
(@xref{(emacs)Arguments}). This is interpreted in two different ways depending
on whether the prefix is positive, i.e. forwards oriented or negative,
i.e. backwards oriented.
A positive prefix means to wrap the skeleton around that many following
words. This is accomplished by putting the words there where the point is
normally left after that skeleton is inserted (@xref{Using Skeletons}). The
point (@xref{Point}) is left at the next interesting spot in the skeleton
instead.
A positive prefix means to wrap the skeleton around that many
following words. This is accomplished by putting the words there where
the point is normally left after that skeleton is inserted (@xref{Using
Skeletons}). The point (@xref{(emacs)Point}) is left at the next
interesting spot in the skeleton instead.
A negative prefix means to do something similar with that many precedingly
marked interregions (@xref{Mark}). In the simplest case, if you type
marked interregions (@xref{(emacs)Mark}). In the simplest case, if you type
@kbd{M--} just before issuing the skeleton command, that will wrap the
skeleton around the current region, just like a positive argument would have
wrapped it around a number of words.
......@@ -124,12 +168,12 @@ tried to follow the order in which you marked these points.
@node Skeletons as Abbrevs
@section Skeletons as Abbrev Expansions
@chapter Skeletons as Abbrev Expansions
@cindex skeletons as abbrevs
Rather than use a keybinding for every skeleton command, you can also define
an abbreviation (@xref{Defining Abbrevs}) that will expand (@xref{Expanding
Abbrevs}) into the skeleton.
Rather than use a keybinding for every skeleton command, you can also
define an abbreviation (@xref{(emacs)Defining Abbrevs}) that will expand
(@xref{(emacs)Expanding Abbrevs}) into the skeleton.
Say you want @samp{ifst} to be an abbreviation for the C language if
statement. You will tell Emacs that @samp{ifst} expands to the empty string
......@@ -149,7 +193,7 @@ have been omitted.)
@node Skeleton Language
@section Skeleton Language
@chapter Skeleton Language
@cindex skeleton language
@findex skeleton-insert
......@@ -228,12 +272,12 @@ skeleton. The first argument is the command name, the second is a
documentation string, and the rest is an interactor and any number of skeleton
elements together forming a skeleton. This skeleton is assigned to a variable
of the same name as the command and can thus be overridden from your
@file{~/.emacs} file (@xref{Init File}).
@file{~/.emacs} file (@xref{(emacs)Init File}).
@node Inserting Pairs
@section Inserting Matching Pairs of Characters
@chapter Inserting Matching Pairs of Characters
@cindex inserting pairs
@cindex pairs
......@@ -247,12 +291,13 @@ fingers backwards, this can be quite relieving too.
@findex pair-insert-maybe
@vindex pair
This is done by binding the first key (@xref{Rebinding}) of the pair to
@code{pair-insert-maybe} instead of @code{self-insert-command}. The maybe
comes from the fact that this at first surprising behaviour is initially
turned off. To enable it, you must set @code{pair} to some non-@code{nil}
value. And even then, a positive argument (@xref{Arguments}) will make this
key behave like a self inserting key (@xref{Inserting Text}).
This is done by binding the first key (@xref{(emacs)Rebinding}) of the
pair to @code{pair-insert-maybe} instead of @code{self-insert-command}.
The maybe comes from the fact that this at first surprising behaviour is
initially turned off. To enable it, you must set @code{pair} to some
non-@code{nil} value. And even then, a positive argument
(@xref{(emacs)Arguments}) will make this key behave like a self
inserting key (@xref{(emacs)Inserting Text}).
@findex pair-on-word
While this breaks with the stated intention of always balancing pairs, it
......@@ -279,7 +324,7 @@ in certain contexts. For example an escaped character will stand for itself.
@node Autoinserting
@section Autoinserting Text in Empty Files
@chapter Autoinserting Text in Empty Files
@cindex autoinserting
@findex auto-insert
......@@ -287,8 +332,8 @@ in certain contexts. For example an escaped character will stand for itself.
the buffer. The main application for this function, as its name suggests,
is to have it be called automatically every time an empty, and only an
empty file is visited. This is accomplished by putting @code{(add-hook
'find-file-hooks 'auto-insert)} into your @file{~/.emacs} file (@xref{Init
File}).
'find-file-hooks 'auto-insert)} into your @file{~/.emacs} file
(@xref{(emacs)Init File}).
@vindex auto-insert-alist
What gets inserted, if anything, is determined by the variable
......@@ -324,11 +369,11 @@ files insert a skeleton with the usual frame.
files insert the usual header, with a copyright of your environment variable
@code{$ORGANIZATION} or else the FSF, and prompt for valid keywords describing
the contents. Files in a @code{bin/} directory for which Emacs could
determine no specialised mode (@xref{Choosing Modes}) are set to Shell script
determine no specialised mode (@xref{(emacs)Choosing Modes}) are set to Shell script
mode.
@findex define-auto-insert
In Lisp (@xref{Init File}) you can use the function @code{define-auto-insert}
In Lisp (@xref{(emacs)Init File}) you can use the function @code{define-auto-insert}
to add to or modify @code{auto-insert-alist}. See its documentation with
@kbd{C-h f auto-insert-alist}.
......@@ -363,14 +408,14 @@ expression that matched the filename.
@node Copyrights
@section Inserting and Updating Copyrights
@chapter Inserting and Updating Copyrights
@cindex copyrights
@findex copyright
@kbd{M-x copyright} is a skeleton inserting command, that adds a copyright
notice at the point. The ``by'' part is taken from your environment variable
@code{$ORGANIZATION} or if that isn't set you are prompted for it. If the
buffer has a comment syntax (@xref{Comments}), this is inserted as a comment.
buffer has a comment syntax (@xref{(emacs)Comments}), this is inserted as a comment.
@findex copyright-update
@vindex copyright-limit
......@@ -382,13 +427,13 @@ existing ones, in the same format as the preceding year, i.e. 1994, '94 or 94.
If a dash-separated year list up to last year is found, that is extended to
current year, else the year is added separated by a comma. Or it replaces
them when this is called with a prefix argument. If a header referring to a
wrong version of the GNU General Public License (@xref{Copying}) is found,
wrong version of the GNU General Public License (@xref{(emacs)Copying}) is found,
that is updated too.
An interesting application for this function is to have it be called
automatically every time a file is saved. This is accomplished by putting
@code{(add-hook 'write-file-hooks 'copyright-update)} into your @file{~/.emacs}
file (@xref{Init File}).
file (@xref{(emacs)Init File}).
@vindex copyright-query
The variable @code{copyright-query} controls whether to update the
......@@ -401,7 +446,7 @@ you are always queried.
@node Executables
@section Making Interpreter Scripts Executable
@chapter Making Interpreter Scripts Executable
@cindex executables
@vindex executable-prefix
......@@ -415,7 +460,7 @@ system @code{chmod} command. The magic number is prefixed by the value of
@code{executable-prefix}.
@vindex executable-magicless-file-regexp
Any file whos name matches @code{executable-magicless-file-regexp} is not
Any file whose name matches @code{executable-magicless-file-regexp} is not
furnished with a magic number, nor is it made executable. This is mainly
intended for resource files, which are only meant to be read in.
......@@ -446,3 +491,145 @@ mode. Otherwise you are alway queried.
will turn it into a self displaying text file, when called as a Un*x command.
The ``interpreter'' used is @code{executable-self-display} with argument
@code{+2}.
@node Timestamps
@chapter Maintaining Timestamps in Modified Files
@cindex timestamps
@findex time-stamp
@vindex write-file-hooks
The @code{time-stamp} command can be used to update automatically a
template in a file with a new time stamp every time you save the file.
Customize the hook @code{write-file-hooks} to add the function
@code{time-stamp} to arrange this.
@vindex time-stamp-active
@vindex time-stamp-format
@vindex time-stamp-start
The time stamp is updated only if the customizable variable
@code{time-stamp-active} is on, which it is by default; the command
@code{time-stamp-toggle-active} can be used to toggle it. The format of
the time stamp is set by the customizable variable
@code{time-stamp-format}.
@vindex time-stamp-line-limit
@vindex time-stamp-end
@vindex time-stamp-count
@vindex time-stamp-inserts-lines
The variables @code{time-stamp-line-limit}, @code{time-stamp-start},
@code{time-stamp-end}, @code{time-stamp-count}, and
@code{time-stamp-inserts-lines} control finding the template. Do not
change these in your init file or you will be incompatible with other
people's files. If you must change them, do so only in the local
variables section of the file itself.
Normally the template must appear in the first 8 lines of a file and
look like one of the following:
@example
Time-stamp: <>
Time-stamp: " "
@end example
The time stamp is written between the brackets or quotes:
@example
Time-stamp: <1998-02-18 10:20:51 gildea>
@end example
@node QuickURL
@chapter QuickURL: Inserting URLs Based on Text at Point
@vindex quickurl-url-file
@findex quickurl
@cindex URLs
@kbd{M-x quickurl} can be used to insert a URL into a buffer based on
the text at point. The URLs are stored in an external file defined by
the variable @code{quickurl-url-file} as a list of either cons cells of
the form @code{(@var{key} . @var{URL})} or
lists of the form @code{(@var{key} @var{URL} @var{comment})}. These
specify that @kbd{M-x quickurl} should insert @var{URL} if the word
@var{key} is at point, for example:
@example
(("FSF" "http://www.fsf.org/" "The Free Software Foundation")
("emacs" . "http://www.emacs.org/")
("hagbard" "http://www.hagbard.demon.co.uk" "Hagbard's World"))
@end example
@findex quickurl-add-url
@findex quickurl-list
@kbd{M-x quickurl-add-url} can be used to add a new @var{key}/@var{URL}
pair. @kbd{M-x quickurl-list} provides interactive editing of the URL
list.
@node Tempo
@chapter Tempo: Flexible Template Insertion
@cindex templates
The Tempo package provides a simple way to define powerful templates, or
macros, if you wish. It is mainly intended for, but not limited to,
other programmers to be used for creating shortcuts for editing
certain kinds of documents.
@findex tempo-backward-mark
@findex tempo-forward-mark
A template is defined as a list of items to be inserted in the current
buffer at point. Some can be simple strings, while others can control
formatting or define special points of interest in the inserted text.
@kbd{M-x tempo-backward-mark} and @kbd{M-x tempo-forward-mark} can be
used to jump between such points.
More flexible templates can be created by including lisp symbols, which
will be evaluated as variables, or lists, which will will be evaluated
as lisp expressions. Automatic completion of specified tags to expanded
templates can be provided.
@findex tempo-define-template
See the documentation for @code{tempo-define-template} for the different
items that can be used to define a tempo template with a command for
inserting it.
See the commentary in @file{tempo.el} for more information on using the
Tempo package.
@node Hippie Expand
@chapter `Hippie' Expansion
@findex hippie-expand
@kindex M-/
@vindex hippie-expand-try-functions-list
@kbd{M-x hippie-expand} is a single command providing a variety of
completions and expansions. Called repeatedly, it tries all possible
completions in succession.
Which ones to try, and in which order, is determined by the contents of
the customizable option @code{hippie-expand-try-functions-list}. Much
customization of the expansion behaviour can be made by changing the
order of, removing, or inserting new functions in this list. Given a
positive numeric argument, @kbd{M-x hippie-expand} jumps directly that
number of functions forward in this list. Given some other argument (a
negative argument or just @kbd{C-u}) it undoes the tried completion.
See the commentary in @file{hippie-exp.el} for more information on the
possibilities.
Typically you would bind @code{hippie-expand} to @kbd{M-/} with
@code{dabbrev-expand}, the standard binding of @kbd{M-/}, providing one
of the expansion possibilities.
@node Concept Index
@unnumbered Concept Index
@printindex cp
@node Command Index
@unnumbered Command Index
@printindex fn
@node Variable Index
@unnumbered Variable Index
@printindex vr
@contents
@bye
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