Commit b1b96d7c authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Update binding of 'M-.' in Intro to Emacs Lisp

* doc/lispintro/emacs-lisp-intro.texi (On Reading this Text)
(Finding More, Buffer Related Review, Buffer Exercises)
(Find a File, Conclusion): 'M-.' is now bound to
'xref-find-definitions'.  (Bug#31542)
parent b239a096
......@@ -822,10 +822,10 @@ programming language, the examples and guided tours will give you an
opportunity to get acquainted with Emacs as a Lisp programming
environment. GNU Emacs supports programming and provides tools that
you will want to become comfortable using, such as @kbd{M-.} (the key
which invokes the @code{find-tag} command). You will also learn about
buffers and other objects that are part of the environment.
Learning about these features of Emacs is like learning new routes
around your home town.
which invokes the @code{xref-find-definitions} command). You will
also learn about buffers and other objects that are part of the
environment. Learning about these features of Emacs is like learning
new routes around your home town.
@ignore
In addition, I have written several programs as extended examples.
......@@ -5357,7 +5357,7 @@ Here is a brief summary of the various functions discussed in this chapter.
Print the documentation for a function or variable.
Conventionally bound to @kbd{C-h f} and @kbd{C-h v}.
@item find-tag
@item xref-find-definitions
Find the file containing the source for a function or variable and
switch buffers to it, positioning point at the beginning of the item.
Conventionally bound to @kbd{M-.} (that's a period following the
......@@ -5411,8 +5411,8 @@ Use @code{if} and @code{get-buffer} to write a function that prints a
message telling you whether a buffer exists.
@item
Using @code{find-tag}, find the source for the @code{copy-to-buffer}
function.
Using @code{xref-find-definitions}, find the source for the
@code{copy-to-buffer} function.
@end itemize
@node More Complex
......@@ -14753,10 +14753,11 @@ creating one if none already exists."
@noindent
(The most recent version of the @code{find-file} function definition
permits you to specify optional wildcards to visit multiple files; that
makes the definition more complex and we will not discuss it here,
since it is not relevant. You can see its source using either
@kbd{M-.} (@code{find-tag}) or @kbd{C-h f} (@code{describe-function}).)
permits you to specify optional wildcards to visit multiple files;
that makes the definition more complex and we will not discuss it
here, since it is not relevant. You can see its source using either
@kbd{M-.} (@code{xref-find-definitions}) or @kbd{C-h f}
(@code{describe-function}).)
@ignore
In Emacs 22
......@@ -18543,8 +18544,8 @@ introduction, it comes as a Texinfo source file, so you can read it
on your computer and as a typeset, printed book.)
Go to the other built-in help that is part of GNU Emacs: the built-in
documentation for all functions and variables, and @code{find-tag},
the program that takes you to sources.
documentation for all functions and variables, and
@code{xref-find-definitions}, the program that takes you to sources.
Here is an example of how I explore the sources. Because of its name,
@file{simple.el} is the file I looked at first, a long time ago. As
......@@ -18580,7 +18581,7 @@ contains the name of the library containing the function's source.
You can put point over the name of the library and press the @key{RET} key,
which in this situation is bound to @code{help-follow}, and be taken
directly to the source, in the same way as @kbd{M-.}
(@code{find-tag}).
(@code{xref-find-definitions}).
The definition for @code{describe-function} illustrates how to
customize the @code{interactive} expression without using the standard
......@@ -18588,13 +18589,14 @@ character codes; and it shows how to create a temporary buffer.
(The @code{indent-to} function is written in C rather than Emacs Lisp;
it is a built-in function. @code{help-follow} takes you to its
source as does @code{find-tag}, when properly set up.)
You can look at a function's source using @code{find-tag}, which is
bound to @kbd{M-.} Finally, you can find out what the Reference
Manual has to say by visiting the manual in Info, and typing @kbd{i}
(@code{Info-index}) and the name of the function, or by looking up the
function in the index to a printed copy of the manual.
source as does @code{xref-find-definitions}, when properly set up.)
You can look at a function's source using
@code{xref-find-definitions}, which is bound to @kbd{M-.} Finally,
you can find out what the Reference Manual has to say by visiting the
manual in Info, and typing @kbd{i} (@code{Info-index}) and the name of
the function, or by looking up the function in the index to a printed
copy of the manual.
Similarly, you can find out what is meant by
@code{insert-and-inherit}.
......
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