Commit b2d77e08 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor clarifications.

parent a5eab4a9
......@@ -1618,7 +1618,7 @@ character, write it as a Lisp character constant: @samp{?} followed by
the character as it would appear in a string.
Here are examples of using vectors to rebind @kbd{C-=} (a control
character outside of ASCII), @kbd{H-a} (a Hyper character; ASCII doesn't
character not in ASCII), @kbd{H-a} (a Hyper character; ASCII doesn't
have Hyper at all), @key{F7} (a function key), and @kbd{C-Mouse-1} (a
keyboard-modified mouse button):
......@@ -2016,8 +2016,8 @@ string quotes, and so on. It does this by assigning each character to
one of fifteen-odd @dfn{syntax classes}. In some cases it specifies
some additional information also.
Each major mode has its own syntax table (though sometimes related
major modes share one syntax table) which it installs in each buffer
Each major mode has its own syntax table (though related major modes
sometimes share one syntax table) which it installs in each buffer
that uses the mode. The syntax table installed in the current buffer
is the one that all commands use, so we call it ``the'' syntax table.
......@@ -2278,20 +2278,23 @@ Here an absolute file name is used, so no searching is done.
@item
@cindex loading Lisp libraries automatically
@cindex autoload Lisp libraries
Tell Emacs to automatically load a Lisp library named @file{mypackage}
(i.e.@: a file @file{mypackage.elc} or @file{mypackage.el}) when the
function @code{myfunction} in that library is called:
Tell Emacs to find the definition for the function @code{myfunction}
by loading a Lisp library named @file{mypackage} (i.e.@: a file
@file{mypackage.elc} or @file{mypackage.el}):
@example
(autoload 'myfunction "mypackage" "Do what I say." t)
@end example
@noindent
Here the string @code{"Do what I say."} is the function's documentation
string made available to Emacs even when the package is not loaded
(e.g., for commands such as @kbd{C-h a}), and @code{t} tells Emacs this
function is interactive, that is, it can be invoked interactively by
typing @kbd{M-x myfunction @key{RET}} or by binding it to a key.
Here the string @code{"Do what I say."} is the function's
documentation string. You specify it in the @code{autoload}
definition so it will be available for help commands even when the
package is not loaded. The last argument, @code{t}, indicates that
this function is interactive; that is, it can be invoked interactively
by typing @kbd{M-x myfunction @key{RET}} or by binding it to a key.
If the function is not interactive, omit the @code{t} or use
@code{nil}.
@item
Rebind the key @kbd{C-x l} to run the function @code{make-symbolic-link}.
......@@ -2398,10 +2401,10 @@ library. @xref{Hooks}.
Normally Emacs uses the environment variable @env{HOME} to find
@file{.emacs}; that's what @samp{~} means in a file name. But if you
have done @code{su}, Emacs tries to find your own @file{.emacs}, not
that of the user you are currently pretending to be. The idea is
that you should get your own editor customizations even if you are
running as the super user.
run Emacs from a shell started by @code{su}, Emacs tries to find your
own @file{.emacs}, not that of the user you are currently pretending
to be. The idea is that you should get your own editor customizations
even if you are running as the super user.
More precisely, Emacs first determines which user's init file to use.
It gets the user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
......
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