Commit b5173574 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

(String Basics): Add an @xref to "Character Codes".

parent 57e2db6d
......@@ -39,7 +39,8 @@ keyboard character events.
Characters are represented in Emacs Lisp as integers;
whether an integer is a character or not is determined only by how it is
used. Thus, strings really contain integers.
used. Thus, strings really contain integers. @xref{Character Codes},
for details about character representation in Emacs.
The length of a string (like any array) is fixed, and cannot be
altered once the string exists. Strings in Lisp are @emph{not}
......@@ -54,11 +55,8 @@ and @code{aset} (@pxref{Array Functions}).
There are two text representations for non-@acronym{ASCII} characters in
Emacs strings (and in buffers): unibyte and multibyte (@pxref{Text
Representations}). An @acronym{ASCII} character always occupies one byte in a
string; in fact, when a string is all @acronym{ASCII}, there is no real
difference between the unibyte and multibyte representations.
For most Lisp programming, you don't need to be concerned with these two
representations.
Representations}). For most Lisp programming, you don't need to be
concerned with these two representations.
Sometimes key sequences are represented as strings. When a string is
a key sequence, string elements in the range 128 to 255 represent meta
......
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