Commit b5b91ca6 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

(Font X): Distinguish between client-side and server-side fonts. List

valid Fontconfig properties.  Add reference to Fontconfig manual.
List valid GTK font properties.  Explain use of fc-list.
parent a323fa14
......@@ -818,11 +818,19 @@ resources file to take effect. @xref{Resources}. When specifying a
font in your X resources file, you should not quote it.
@cindex fontconfig
Emacs recognizes two types of fonts: @dfn{client-side} fonts, which
are provided by the Xft and Fontconfig libraries, and
@dfn{server-side} fonts, which are provided by the X server itself.
Most client-side fonts support advanced font features such as
antialiasing and subpixel hinting, while server-side fonts do not.
There are four different ways to express a ``font name''. The first
is to use the @dfn{Fontconfig format}, which has the following form:
format consists of @dfn{Fontconfig patterns}. Fontconfig patterns
match only client-side fonts provided by Xft and Fontconfig, and have
the following form:
@smallexample
@var{fontname}[-@var{fontsize}][:@var{property1}][:@var{property2}]...
@var{fontname}[-@var{fontsize}][:@var{name1}=@var{values1}][:@var{name2}=@var{values2}]...
@end smallexample
@noindent
......@@ -830,10 +838,38 @@ Within this format, any of the elements in braces may be omitted.
Here, @var{fontname} is the ``family name'' of the font, such as
@samp{Monospace} or @samp{DejaVu Serif}; @var{fontsize} is the ``point
size'' of the font (one ``printer's point'' is about 1/72 of an inch);
and the @var{property} entries specify font settings such as
@samp{bold}, @samp{italic}, @samp{weight=bold}, @samp{slant=oblique},
and so forth. Here are some examples of specifying fonts using the
Fontconfig format:
and the @samp{@var{name}=@var{values}} entries specify settings such
as the slant and weight of the font. Each @var{values} may be a
single value, or a list of values separated by commas. In addition,
some property values are valid with only one kind of property name, in
which case the @samp{@var{name}=} part may be omitted.
Here is a list of common font properties:
@table @samp
@item slant
One of @samp{italic}, @samp{oblique} or @samp{roman}.
@item weight
One of @samp{light}, @samp{medium}, @samp{demibold}, @samp{bold} or
@samp{black}.
@item style
Some fonts define special styles which are a combination of slant and
weight. For instance, the font @samp{Dejavu Sans} defines the style
@samp{book}. This property, if specified, overrides the slant and
weight properties.
@item width
One of @samp{condensed}, @samp{normal}, or @samp{expanded}.
@item spacing
One of @samp{monospace}, @samp{proportional}, @samp{dual-width}, or
@samp{charcell}.
@end table
@noindent
Here are some examples of Fontconfig patterns:
@smallexample
Monospace
......@@ -843,16 +879,40 @@ DejaVu Sans Mono:bold:italic
Monospace-12:weight=bold:slant=italic
@end smallexample
The second way to specify a font is to use the @dfn{GTK format}.
This has the syntax
See the Fontconfig manual for a more detailed description of
Fontconfig patterns. This manual is located in the file
@file{fontconfig-user.html}, which is distributed with Fontconfig. It
is also available online at
@url{http://fontconfig.org/fontconfig-user.html}. In particular, the
manual describes additional font properties that influence how the
font is hinted, antialiased, or scaled.
The second way to specify a font is to use a @dfn{GTK font
description}. Like Fontconfig patterns, GTK font descriptions match
only client-side fonts provided by Xft and Fontconfig. They have the
syntax
@smallexample
@var{fontname} [@var{properties}] [@var{fontsize}]
@end smallexample
@noindent
where @var{fontname} is the family name, @var{properties} is a list of
font properties separated by spaces, and @var{fontsize} is the point
size. For example:
property values separated by spaces, and @var{fontsize} is the point
size. The properties that you may specify are as follows:
@table @samp
@item style
One of @samp{roman}, @samp{italic} or @samp{oblique}. If omitted, the
@samp{roman} style is used.
@item weight
One of @samp{medium}, @samp{ultra-light}, @samp{light},
@samp{semi-bold}, or @samp{bold}. If omitted, @samp{medium} weight is
used.
@end table
@noindent
Here are some examples of GTK font descriptions:
@smallexample
Monospace 12
......@@ -944,14 +1004,24 @@ normal font specification. For instance,
@end smallexample
@noindent
is equivalent to @samp{6x13}.
is equivalent to @samp{6x13}. This is the fourth and final method of
specifying a font.
@cindex listing system fonts
You will probably want to use a fixed-width default font---that is,
a font in which all characters have the same width. Any font with
@samp{m} or @samp{c} in the @var{spacing} field of the XLFD is a
fixed-width font. Here's how to use the @command{xlsfonts} program to
list all the fixed-width fonts available on your system:
a font in which all characters have the same width. Here's how to use
the @command{fc-list} command to list all fixed-width Xft and
Fontconfig fonts available on your system:
@example
fc-list :spacing=mono
fc-list :spacing=charcell
@end example
For server-side X fonts, any font with @samp{m} or @samp{c} in the
@var{spacing} field of the XLFD is a fixed-width font. Here's how to
use the @command{xlsfonts} program to list all the fixed-width fonts
available on your system:
@example
xlsfonts -fn '*x*' | egrep "^[0-9]+x[0-9]+"
......
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