Commit b8a82b69 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Update doc for obsolescence of "unibyte: t"

* doc/emacs/mule.texi (Disabling Multibyte):
* doc/lispref/loading.texi (Loading Non-ASCII):
Replace the obsolete "unibyte: t" with "coding: raw-text".
* etc/NEWS: Related markup.
parent 234d8d66
2012-05-10 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* mule.texi (Disabling Multibyte): Replace the obsolete "unibyte: t"
with "coding: raw-text".
* files.texi (Interlocking): Mention create-lockfiles option.
2012-05-09 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -287,20 +287,17 @@ auto mode selection.
This includes the Emacs initialization
file, @file{.emacs}, and the initialization files of packages
such as Gnus. However, you can specify unibyte loading for a
particular Lisp file, by adding an entry @samp{unibyte: t} in a file
local variables section (@pxref{File Variables}). Then that file is
always loaded as unibyte text. Note that this does not represent a
real @code{unibyte} variable, rather it just acts as an indicator
to Emacs in the same way as @code{coding} does (@pxref{Specify Coding}).
particular Lisp file, by adding an entry @samp{coding: raw-text} in a file
local variables section. @xref{Specify Coding}.
Then that file is always loaded as unibyte text.
@ignore
@c I don't see the point of this statement:
The motivation for these conventions is that it is more reliable to
always load any particular Lisp file in the same way.
@end ignore
Note also that this feature only applies to @emph{loading} Lisp files
for evaluation, not to visiting them for editing. You can also load a
Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by typing @kbd{C-x
@key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before loading it.
You can also load a Lisp file as unibyte, on any one occasion, by
typing @kbd{C-x @key{RET} c raw-text @key{RET}} immediately before
loading it.
@c See http://debbugs.gnu.org/11226 for lack of unibyte tooltip.
@vindex enable-multibyte-characters
......
2012-05-10 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* loading.texi (Loading Non-ASCII): Replace the obsolete "unibyte: t"
with "coding: raw-text".
* files.texi (File Locks): Mention create-lockfiles option.
2012-05-09 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -374,7 +374,7 @@ strings are multibyte strings should not be noticeable, since
inserting them in unibyte buffers converts them to unibyte
automatically. However, if this does make a difference, you can force
a particular Lisp file to be interpreted as unibyte by writing
@samp{unibyte: t} in a local variables section. With
@samp{coding: raw-text} in a local variables section. With
that designator, the file will unconditionally be interpreted as
unibyte, even in an ordinary multibyte Emacs session. This can matter
when making keybindings to non-@acronym{ASCII} characters written as
......
......@@ -69,6 +69,7 @@ specifying any file to visit or expression to evaluate.
** You can prevent the creation of lock files by setting `create-lockfiles'
to nil. Use with caution, and only if you really need to.
+++
** Using "unibyte: t" in Lisp source files is obsolete.
Use "coding: raw-text" instead.
......
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