Commit c1dabff0 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

* emacs/ack.texi, emacs/building.texi, emacs/calendar.texi

* emacs/custom.texi, emacs/maintaining.texi, emacs/text.texi:
* misc/calc.texi, misc/dired-x.texi:
Use @LaTeX rather than La@TeX.

Fixes: debbugs:10910
parent 16af873e
2012-05-28 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* ack.texi, building.texi, calendar.texi, custom.texi:
* maintaining.texi, text.texi: Use @LaTeX rather than La@TeX.
2012-05-27 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* emacs.texi: Simplify following removal of node pointers.
......
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ He also wrote @file{dynamic-setting.el}.
@item
Carsten Dominik wrote Ref@TeX{}, a package for setting up labels and
cross-references in La@TeX{} documents; and co-wrote IDLWAVE mode
cross-references in @LaTeX{} documents; and co-wrote IDLWAVE mode
(q.v.@:). He was the original author of Org mode, for maintaining notes,
todo lists, and project planning. Bastien Guerry subsequently took
over maintainership. Benjamin Andresen, Thomas Baumann, Joel Boehland, Jan Böcker, Lennart
......@@ -549,7 +549,7 @@ for the Transport Layer Security protocol.
@item
Arne Jørgensen wrote @file{latexenc.el}, a package to
automatically guess the correct coding system in La@TeX{} files.
automatically guess the correct coding system in @LaTeX{} files.
@item
Alexandre Julliard wrote @file{vc-git.el}, support for the Git version
......@@ -567,7 +567,7 @@ control system.
Henry Kautz wrote @file{bib-mode.el}, a mode for maintaining
bibliography databases compatible with @code{refer} (the @code{troff}
version) and @code{lookbib}, and @file{refbib.el}, a package to convert
those databases to the format used by the La@TeX{} text formatting package.
those databases to the format used by the @LaTeX{} text formatting package.
@item
Taichi Kawabata added support for Devanagari script and the Indian
......
......@@ -416,7 +416,7 @@ by various version control systems.
Flymake mode is a minor mode that performs on-the-fly syntax
checking for many programming and markup languages, including C, C++,
Perl, HTML, and @TeX{}/La@TeX{}. It is somewhat analogous to Flyspell
Perl, HTML, and @TeX{}/@LaTeX{}. It is somewhat analogous to Flyspell
mode, which performs spell checking for ordinary human languages in a
similar fashion (@pxref{Spelling}). As you edit a file, Flymake mode
runs an appropriate syntax checking tool in the background, using a
......
......@@ -345,7 +345,7 @@ calendar deletes or iconifies that frame depending on the value of
@node Writing Calendar Files
@section Writing Calendar Files
You can write calendars and diary entries to HTML and La@TeX{} files.
You can write calendars and diary entries to HTML and @LaTeX{} files.
@cindex calendar and HTML
The Calendar HTML commands produce files of HTML code that contain
......@@ -380,8 +380,8 @@ non-@code{nil}, then the monthly calendars show the day-of-the-year
number. The variable @code{cal-html-year-index-cols} specifies the
number of columns in the yearly index page.
@cindex calendar and La@TeX{}
The Calendar La@TeX{} commands produce a buffer of La@TeX{} code that
@cindex calendar and @LaTeX{}
The Calendar @LaTeX{} commands produce a buffer of @LaTeX{} code that
prints as a calendar. Depending on the command you use, the printed
calendar covers the day, week, month or year that point is in.
......@@ -441,7 +441,7 @@ the individual cal-tex functions to see which calendars support which
features.
You can use the variable @code{cal-tex-preamble-extra} to insert extra
La@TeX{} commands in the preamble of the generated document if you need
@LaTeX{} commands in the preamble of the generated document if you need
to.
@node Holidays
......
......@@ -866,7 +866,7 @@ other modes based on Text mode:
@noindent
This works by calling @code{auto-fill-mode}, which enables the minor
mode when no argument is supplied (@pxref{Minor Modes}). Next,
suppose you don't want Auto Fill mode turned on in La@TeX{} mode,
suppose you don't want Auto Fill mode turned on in @LaTeX{} mode,
which is one of the modes based on Text mode. You can do this with
the following additional line:
......@@ -878,7 +878,7 @@ the following additional line:
Here we have used the special macro @code{lambda} to construct an
anonymous function (@pxref{Lambda Expressions,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp
Reference Manual}), which calls @code{auto-fill-mode} with an argument
of @code{-1} to disable the minor mode. Because La@TeX{} mode runs
of @code{-1} to disable the minor mode. Because @LaTeX{} mode runs
@code{latex-mode-hook} after running @code{text-mode-hook}, the result
leaves Auto Fill mode disabled.
......
......@@ -1659,7 +1659,7 @@ Tags for variables and functions in classes are named
@samp{@var{class}.@var{variable}} and @samp{@var{class}.@var{function}}.
@item
In La@TeX{} documents, the arguments for @code{\chapter},
In @LaTeX{} documents, the arguments for @code{\chapter},
@code{\section}, @code{\subsection}, @code{\subsubsection},
@code{\eqno}, @code{\label}, @code{\ref}, @code{\cite},
@code{\bibitem}, @code{\part}, @code{\appendix}, @code{\entry},
......
......@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ publish them in many formats.
@cindex mode, nXML
@findex nxml-mode
Emacs has other major modes for text which contains ``embedded''
commands, such as @TeX{} and La@TeX{} (@pxref{TeX Mode}); HTML and
commands, such as @TeX{} and @LaTeX{} (@pxref{TeX Mode}); HTML and
SGML (@pxref{HTML Mode}); XML
@ifinfo
(@pxref{Top,The nXML Mode Manual,,nxml-mode, nXML Mode});
......@@ -1372,7 +1372,7 @@ etc.
export and publication. To export the current buffer, type @kbd{C-c
C-e} (@code{org-export}) anywhere in an Org buffer. This command
prompts for an export format; currently supported formats include
HTML, La@TeX{}, OpenDocument (@file{.odt}), and PDF. Some formats,
HTML, @LaTeX{}, OpenDocument (@file{.odt}), and PDF. Some formats,
such as PDF, require certain system tools to be installed.
@vindex org-publish-project-alist
......@@ -1405,11 +1405,11 @@ This is an example.
@node TeX Mode
@section @TeX{} Mode
@cindex @TeX{} mode
@cindex La@TeX{} mode
@cindex @LaTeX{} mode
@cindex Sli@TeX{} mode
@cindex Doc@TeX{} mode
@cindex mode, @TeX{}
@cindex mode, La@TeX{}
@cindex mode, @LaTeX{}
@cindex mode, Sli@TeX{}
@cindex mode, Doc@TeX{}
@findex tex-mode
......@@ -1422,15 +1422,15 @@ This is an example.
Emacs provides special major modes for editing files written in
@TeX{} and its related formats. @TeX{} is a powerful text formatter
written by Donald Knuth; like GNU Emacs, it is free software.
La@TeX{} is a simplified input format for @TeX{}, implemented using
@LaTeX{} is a simplified input format for @TeX{}, implemented using
@TeX{} macros. Doc@TeX{} is a special file format in which the
La@TeX{} sources are written, combining sources with documentation.
Sli@TeX{} is an obsolete special form of La@TeX{}.@footnote{It has
@LaTeX{} sources are written, combining sources with documentation.
Sli@TeX{} is an obsolete special form of @LaTeX{}.@footnote{It has
been replaced by the @samp{slides} document class, which comes with
La@TeX{}.}
@LaTeX{}.}
@vindex tex-default-mode
@TeX{} mode has four variants: Plain @TeX{} mode, La@TeX{} mode,
@TeX{} mode has four variants: Plain @TeX{} mode, @LaTeX{} mode,
Doc@TeX{} mode, and Sli@TeX{} mode. These distinct major modes differ
only slightly, and are designed for editing the four different
formats. Emacs selects the appropriate mode by looking at the
......@@ -1450,13 +1450,13 @@ which are not documented in this manual:
@itemize @bullet
@item
Bib@TeX{} mode is a major mode for Bib@TeX{} files, which are commonly
used for keeping bibliographic references for La@TeX{} documents. For
used for keeping bibliographic references for @LaTeX{} documents. For
more information, see the documentation string for the command
@code{bibtex-mode}.
@item
The Ref@TeX{} package provides a minor mode which can be used with
La@TeX{} mode to manage bibliographic references.
@LaTeX{} mode to manage bibliographic references.
@ifinfo
@xref{Top,The Ref@TeX{} Manual,,reftex}.
@end ifinfo
......@@ -1561,23 +1561,23 @@ is useful for the various motion commands and automatic match display
to work with them.
@node LaTeX Editing
@subsection La@TeX{} Editing Commands
@subsection @LaTeX{} Editing Commands
La@TeX{} mode provides a few extra features not applicable to plain
@LaTeX{} mode provides a few extra features not applicable to plain
@TeX{}:
@table @kbd
@item C-c C-o
Insert @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} for La@TeX{} block and position
Insert @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} for @LaTeX{} block and position
point on a line between them (@code{tex-latex-block}).
@item C-c C-e
Close the innermost La@TeX{} block not yet closed
Close the innermost @LaTeX{} block not yet closed
(@code{tex-close-latex-block}).
@end table
@findex tex-latex-block
@kindex C-c C-o @r{(La@TeX{} mode)}
In La@TeX{} input, @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} tags are used to
@kindex C-c C-o @r{(@LaTeX{} mode)}
In @LaTeX{} input, @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} tags are used to
group blocks of text. To insert a block, type @kbd{C-c C-o}
(@code{tex-latex-block}). This prompts for a block type, and inserts
the appropriate matching @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} tags, leaving a
......@@ -1586,14 +1586,14 @@ blank line between the two and moving point there.
@vindex latex-block-names
When entering the block type argument to @kbd{C-c C-o}, you can use
the usual completion commands (@pxref{Completion}). The default
completion list contains the standard La@TeX{} block types. If you
completion list contains the standard @LaTeX{} block types. If you
want additional block types for completion, customize the list
variable @code{latex-block-names}.
@findex tex-close-latex-block
@kindex C-c C-e @r{(La@TeX{} mode)}
@kindex C-c C-e @r{(@LaTeX{} mode)}
@findex latex-electric-env-pair-mode
In La@TeX{} input, @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} tags must balance.
In @LaTeX{} input, @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} tags must balance.
You can use @kbd{C-c C-e} (@code{tex-close-latex-block}) to insert an
@samp{\end} tag which matches the last unmatched @samp{\begin}. It
also indents the @samp{\end} to match the corresponding @samp{\begin},
......@@ -1670,7 +1670,7 @@ such as @code{"/tmp"}.
The buffer's @TeX{} variant determines what shell command @kbd{C-c
C-b} actually runs. In Plain @TeX{} mode, it is specified by the
variable @code{tex-run-command}, which defaults to @code{"tex"}. In
La@TeX{} mode, it is specified by @code{latex-run-command}, which
@LaTeX{} mode, it is specified by @code{latex-run-command}, which
defaults to @code{"latex"}. The shell command that @kbd{C-c C-v} runs
to view the @file{.dvi} output is determined by the variable
@code{tex-dvi-view-command}, regardless of the @TeX{} variant. The
......@@ -1725,9 +1725,9 @@ after. The lines containing the two strings are included in the header.
If @samp{%**start of header} does not appear within the first 100 lines of
the buffer, @kbd{C-c C-r} assumes that there is no header.
In La@TeX{} mode, the header begins with @samp{\documentclass} or
In @LaTeX{} mode, the header begins with @samp{\documentclass} or
@samp{\documentstyle} and ends with @samp{\begin@{document@}}. These
are commands that La@TeX{} requires you to use in any case, so nothing
are commands that @LaTeX{} requires you to use in any case, so nothing
special needs to be done to identify the header.
@findex tex-file
......@@ -1769,7 +1769,7 @@ Variables}.
@findex tex-bibtex-file
@kindex C-c TAB @r{(@TeX{} mode)}
@vindex tex-bibtex-command
For La@TeX{} files, you can use Bib@TeX{} to process the auxiliary
For @LaTeX{} files, you can use Bib@TeX{} to process the auxiliary
file for the current buffer's file. Bib@TeX{} looks up bibliographic
citations in a data base and prepares the cited references for the
bibliography section. The command @kbd{C-c @key{TAB}}
......
2012-05-28 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* calc.texi, dired-x.texi: Use @LaTeX rather than La@TeX. (Bug#10910)
* sc.texi: Nuke hand-written node pointers.
Fix top-level menu to match actual node order.
......
......@@ -557,7 +557,7 @@ these equations for the variables @expr{x} and @expr{y}.
Type @kbd{d B} to view the solutions in more readable notation.
Type @w{@kbd{d C}} to view them in C language notation, @kbd{d T}
to view them in the notation for the @TeX{} typesetting system,
and @kbd{d L} to view them in the notation for the La@TeX{} typesetting
and @kbd{d L} to view them in the notation for the @LaTeX{} typesetting
system. Type @kbd{d N} to return to normal notation.
@noindent
......@@ -939,7 +939,7 @@ is
Calc has added annotations to the file to help it remember the modes
that were used for this formula. They are formatted like comments
in the @TeX{} typesetting language, just in case you are using @TeX{} or
La@TeX{}. (In this example @TeX{} is not being used, so you might want
@LaTeX{}. (In this example @TeX{} is not being used, so you might want
to move these comments up to the top of the file or otherwise put them
out of the way.)
......@@ -5026,7 +5026,7 @@ One more mode that makes reading formulas easier is Big mode.
Here things like powers, square roots, and quotients and fractions
are displayed in a two-dimensional pictorial form. Calc has other
language modes as well, such as C mode, FORTRAN mode, @TeX{} mode
and La@TeX{} mode.
and @LaTeX{} mode.
@smallexample
@group
......@@ -13842,7 +13842,7 @@ left or right as you prefer.
@noindent
The commands in this section change Calc to use a different notation for
entry and display of formulas, corresponding to the conventions of some
other common language such as Pascal or La@TeX{}. Objects displayed on the
other common language such as Pascal or @LaTeX{}. Objects displayed on the
stack or yanked from the Calculator to an editing buffer will be formatted
in the current language; objects entered in algebraic entry or yanked from
another buffer will be interpreted according to the current language.
......@@ -13867,10 +13867,10 @@ the brackets in @samp{a[1]} and @samp{a[2]}, would not have known that
and would have written the formula back with notations (like implicit
multiplication) which would not have been valid for a C program.
As another example, suppose you are maintaining a C program and a La@TeX{}
As another example, suppose you are maintaining a C program and a @LaTeX{}
document, each of which needs a copy of the same formula. You can grab the
formula from the program in C mode, switch to La@TeX{} mode, and yank the
formula into the document in La@TeX{} math-mode format.
formula from the program in C mode, switch to @LaTeX{} mode, and yank the
formula into the document in @LaTeX{} math-mode format.
Language modes are selected by typing the letter @kbd{d} followed by a
shifted letter key.
......@@ -14067,7 +14067,7 @@ convert to lower-case on input. With a negative prefix, these modes
convert to lower-case for display and input.
@node TeX and LaTeX Language Modes, Eqn Language Mode, C FORTRAN Pascal, Language Modes
@subsection @TeX{} and La@TeX{} Language Modes
@subsection @TeX{} and @LaTeX{} Language Modes
@noindent
@kindex d T
......@@ -14079,38 +14079,38 @@ convert to lower-case for display and input.
The @kbd{d T} (@code{calc-tex-language}) command selects the conventions
of ``math mode'' in Donald Knuth's @TeX{} typesetting language,
and the @kbd{d L} (@code{calc-latex-language}) command selects the
conventions of ``math mode'' in La@TeX{}, a typesetting language that
uses @TeX{} as its formatting engine. Calc's La@TeX{} language mode can
read any formula that the @TeX{} language mode can, although La@TeX{}
conventions of ``math mode'' in @LaTeX{}, a typesetting language that
uses @TeX{} as its formatting engine. Calc's @LaTeX{} language mode can
read any formula that the @TeX{} language mode can, although @LaTeX{}
mode may display it differently.
Formulas are entered and displayed in the appropriate notation;
@texline @math{\sin(a/b)}
@infoline @expr{sin(a/b)}
will appear as @samp{\sin\left( @{a \over b@} \right)} in @TeX{} mode and
@samp{\sin\left(\frac@{a@}@{b@}\right)} in La@TeX{} mode.
@samp{\sin\left(\frac@{a@}@{b@}\right)} in @LaTeX{} mode.
Math formulas are often enclosed by @samp{$ $} signs in @TeX{} and
La@TeX{}; these should be omitted when interfacing with Calc. To Calc,
@LaTeX{}; these should be omitted when interfacing with Calc. To Calc,
the @samp{$} sign has the same meaning it always does in algebraic
formulas (a reference to an existing entry on the stack).
Complex numbers are displayed as in @samp{3 + 4i}. Fractions and
quotients are written using @code{\over} in @TeX{} mode (as in
@code{@{a \over b@}}) and @code{\frac} in La@TeX{} mode (as in
@code{@{a \over b@}}) and @code{\frac} in @LaTeX{} mode (as in
@code{\frac@{a@}@{b@}}); binomial coefficients are written with
@code{\choose} in @TeX{} mode (as in @code{@{a \choose b@}}) and
@code{\binom} in La@TeX{} mode (as in @code{\binom@{a@}@{b@}}).
@code{\binom} in @LaTeX{} mode (as in @code{\binom@{a@}@{b@}}).
Interval forms are written with @code{\ldots}, and error forms are
written with @code{\pm}. Absolute values are written as in
@samp{|x + 1|}, and the floor and ceiling functions are written with
@code{\lfloor}, @code{\rfloor}, etc. The words @code{\left} and
@code{\right} are ignored when reading formulas in @TeX{} and La@TeX{}
@code{\right} are ignored when reading formulas in @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}
modes. Both @code{inf} and @code{uinf} are written as @code{\infty};
when read, @code{\infty} always translates to @code{inf}.
Function calls are written the usual way, with the function name followed
by the arguments in parentheses. However, functions for which @TeX{}
and La@TeX{} have special names (like @code{\sin}) will use curly braces
and @LaTeX{} have special names (like @code{\sin}) will use curly braces
instead of parentheses for very simple arguments. During input, curly
braces and parentheses work equally well for grouping, but when the
document is formatted the curly braces will be invisible. Thus the
......@@ -14125,14 +14125,14 @@ The @TeX{} specific unit names (@pxref{Predefined Units}) will not use
the @samp{tex} prefix; the unit name for a @TeX{} point will be
@samp{pt} instead of @samp{texpt}, for example.
Function and variable names not treated specially by @TeX{} and La@TeX{}
Function and variable names not treated specially by @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}
are simply written out as-is, which will cause them to come out in
italic letters in the printed document. If you invoke @kbd{d T} or
@kbd{d L} with a positive numeric prefix argument, names of more than
one character will instead be enclosed in a protective commands that
will prevent them from being typeset in the math italics; they will be
written @samp{\hbox@{@var{name}@}} in @TeX{} mode and
@samp{\text@{@var{name}@}} in La@TeX{} mode. The
@samp{\text@{@var{name}@}} in @LaTeX{} mode. The
@samp{\hbox@{ @}} and @samp{\text@{ @}} notations are ignored during
reading. If you use a negative prefix argument, such function names are
written @samp{\@var{name}}, and function names that begin with @code{\} during
......@@ -14143,7 +14143,7 @@ any @TeX{} mode.)
During reading, text of the form @samp{\matrix@{ ...@: @}} is replaced
by @samp{[ ...@: ]}. The same also applies to @code{\pmatrix} and
@code{\bmatrix}. In La@TeX{} mode this also applies to
@code{\bmatrix}. In @LaTeX{} mode this also applies to
@samp{\begin@{matrix@} ... \end@{matrix@}},
@samp{\begin@{bmatrix@} ... \end@{bmatrix@}},
@samp{\begin@{pmatrix@} ... \end@{pmatrix@}}, as well as
......@@ -14153,7 +14153,7 @@ and the symbols @samp{\cr} and @samp{\\} are interpreted as semicolons.
During output, matrices are displayed in @samp{\matrix@{ a & b \\ c & d@}}
format in @TeX{} mode and in
@samp{\begin@{pmatrix@} a & b \\ c & d \end@{pmatrix@}} format in
La@TeX{} mode; you may need to edit this afterwards to change to your
@LaTeX{} mode; you may need to edit this afterwards to change to your
preferred matrix form. If you invoke @kbd{d T} or @kbd{d L} with an
argument of 2 or -2, then matrices will be displayed in two-dimensional
form, such as
......@@ -14177,7 +14177,7 @@ c & d
@end example
@noindent
While this wouldn't bother Calc, it is incorrect La@TeX{}.
While this wouldn't bother Calc, it is incorrect @LaTeX{}.
(Similarly for @TeX{}.)
Accents like @code{\tilde} and @code{\bar} translate into function
......@@ -14185,7 +14185,7 @@ calls internally (@samp{tilde(x)}, @samp{bar(x)}). The @code{\underline}
sequence is treated as an accent. The @code{\vec} accent corresponds
to the function name @code{Vec}, because @code{vec} is the name of
a built-in Calc function. The following table shows the accents
in Calc, @TeX{}, La@TeX{} and @dfn{eqn} (described in the next section):
in Calc, @TeX{}, @LaTeX{} and @dfn{eqn} (described in the next section):
@ignore
@iftex
......@@ -14362,7 +14362,7 @@ reading is:
@end example
Note that, because these symbols are ignored, reading a @TeX{} or
La@TeX{} formula into Calc and writing it back out may lose spacing and
@LaTeX{} formula into Calc and writing it back out may lose spacing and
font information.
Also, the ``discretionary multiplication sign'' @samp{\*} is read
......@@ -14528,7 +14528,7 @@ treated the same as a space in @dfn{eqn} mode, as is the @samp{~}
symbol (these are used to introduce spaces of various widths into
the typeset output of @dfn{eqn}).
As in La@TeX{} mode, Calc's formatter omits parentheses around the
As in @LaTeX{} mode, Calc's formatter omits parentheses around the
arguments of functions like @code{ln} and @code{sin} if they are
``simple-looking''; in this case Calc surrounds the argument with
braces, separated by a @samp{~} from the function name: @samp{sin~@{x@}}.
......@@ -15939,7 +15939,7 @@ FORTRAN language mode (@kbd{d F}).
@TeX{} language mode (@kbd{d T}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
@item LaTeX
La@TeX{} language mode (@kbd{d L}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
@LaTeX{} language mode (@kbd{d L}; @pxref{TeX and LaTeX Language Modes}).
@item Eqn
@dfn{Eqn} language mode (@kbd{d E}; @pxref{Eqn Language Mode}).
......@@ -28002,7 +28002,7 @@ than the point used by @TeX{}), @code{texdd} (a Didot point),
@code{texcc} (a Cicero) and @code{texsp} (a scaled @TeX{} point,
all dimensions representable in @TeX{} are multiples of this value).
When Calc is using the @TeX{} or La@TeX{} language mode (@pxref{TeX
When Calc is using the @TeX{} or @LaTeX{} language mode (@pxref{TeX
and LaTeX Language Modes}), the @TeX{} specific unit names will not
use the @samp{tex} prefix; the unit name for a @TeX{} point will be
@samp{pt} instead of @samp{texpt}, for example. To avoid conflicts,
......@@ -28911,7 +28911,7 @@ since the evaluation step will also evaluate @code{pi}.
@cindex @samp{=>} operator
The special algebraic symbol @samp{=>} is known as the @dfn{evaluates-to
operator}. (It will show up as an @code{evalto} function call in
other language modes like Pascal and La@TeX{}.) This is a binary
other language modes like Pascal and @LaTeX{}.) This is a binary
operator, that is, it has a lefthand and a righthand argument,
although it can be entered with the righthand argument omitted.
......@@ -30490,7 +30490,7 @@ are visiting your own files.
Calc will try to guess an appropriate language based on the major mode
of the editing buffer. (@xref{Language Modes}.) If the current buffer is
in @code{latex-mode}, for example, Calc will set its language to La@TeX{}.
in @code{latex-mode}, for example, Calc will set its language to @LaTeX{}.
Similarly, Calc will use @TeX{} language for @code{tex-mode},
@code{plain-tex-mode} and @code{context-mode}, C language for
@code{c-mode} and @code{c++-mode}, FORTRAN language for
......@@ -30507,7 +30507,7 @@ understands are:
@enumerate
@item
The @TeX{} and La@TeX{} math delimiters @samp{$ $}, @samp{$$ $$},
The @TeX{} and @LaTeX{} math delimiters @samp{$ $}, @samp{$$ $$},
@samp{\[ \]}, and @samp{\( \)};
@item
Lines beginning with @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} (except matrix delimiters);
......@@ -30647,14 +30647,14 @@ you haven't done anything with this formula yet.
When Embedded mode ``activates'' a formula, i.e., when it examines
the formula for the first time since the buffer was created or
loaded, Calc tries to sense the language in which the formula was
written. If the formula contains any La@TeX{}-like @samp{\} sequences,
it is parsed (i.e., read) in La@TeX{} mode. If the formula appears to
written. If the formula contains any @LaTeX{}-like @samp{\} sequences,
it is parsed (i.e., read) in @LaTeX{} mode. If the formula appears to
be written in multi-line Big mode, it is parsed in Big mode. Otherwise,
it is parsed according to the current language mode.
Note that Calc does not change the current language mode according
the formula it reads in. Even though it can read a La@TeX{} formula when
not in La@TeX{} mode, it will immediately rewrite this formula using
the formula it reads in. Even though it can read a @LaTeX{} formula when
not in @LaTeX{} mode, it will immediately rewrite this formula using
whatever language mode is in effect.
@tex
......@@ -30675,8 +30675,8 @@ version.
Plain formulas are preceded and followed by @samp{%%%} signs
by default. This notation has the advantage that the @samp{%}
character begins a comment in @TeX{} and La@TeX{}, so if your formula is
embedded in a @TeX{} or La@TeX{} document its plain version will be
character begins a comment in @TeX{} and @LaTeX{}, so if your formula is
embedded in a @TeX{} or @LaTeX{} document its plain version will be
invisible in the final printed copy. Certain major modes have different
delimiters to ensure that the ``plain'' version will be
in a comment for those modes, also.
......@@ -30962,7 +30962,7 @@ a few lines that look like this:
@noindent
where the leading and trailing @samp{---} can be replaced by
any suitable strings (which must be the same on all three lines)
or omitted altogether; in a @TeX{} or La@TeX{} file, @samp{%} would be a good
or omitted altogether; in a @TeX{} or @LaTeX{} file, @samp{%} would be a good
leading string and no trailing string would be necessary. In a
C program, @samp{/*} and @samp{*/} would be good leading and
trailing strings.
......@@ -35392,7 +35392,7 @@ The simplest delimiters are blank lines. Other delimiters that
Embedded mode understands by default are:
@enumerate
@item
The @TeX{} and La@TeX{} math delimiters @samp{$ $}, @samp{$$ $$},
The @TeX{} and @LaTeX{} math delimiters @samp{$ $}, @samp{$$ $$},
@samp{\[ \]}, and @samp{\( \)};
@item
Lines beginning with @samp{\begin} and @samp{\end} (except matrix delimiters);
......@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ in the @code{dired-load-hook} (@pxref{Installation}). This assumes
@cindex Tib files, how to omit them in Dired
@cindex Omitting tib files in Dired
If you use @code{tib}, the bibliography program for use with @TeX{} and
La@TeX{}, and you
@LaTeX{}, and you
want to omit the @file{INDEX} and the @file{*-t.tex} files, then put
@example
......@@ -741,7 +741,7 @@ variable @code{dired-patch-unclean-extensions}.
@item dired-clean-tex
@findex dired-clean-tex
Flag dispensable files created by @TeX{}, La@TeX{}, and @samp{texinfo} for
Flag dispensable files created by @TeX{}, @LaTeX{}, and @samp{texinfo} for
deletion. See the following variables (@pxref{Advanced Cleaning Variables}):
@itemize @bullet
......@@ -757,7 +757,7 @@ deletion. See the following variables (@pxref{Advanced Cleaning Variables}):
@item dired-very-clean-tex
@findex dired-very-clean-tex
Flag dispensable files created by @TeX{}, La@TeX{}, @samp{texinfo},
Flag dispensable files created by @TeX{}, @LaTeX{}, @samp{texinfo},
and @file{*.dvi} files for deletion.
@end table
......@@ -791,7 +791,7 @@ List of extensions of dispensable files created by @samp{texinfo}.
@vindex dired-latex-unclean-extensions
Default: @code{(".idx" ".lof" ".lot" ".glo")}
List of extensions of dispensable files created by La@TeX{}.
List of extensions of dispensable files created by @LaTeX{}.
@item dired-bibtex-unclean-extensions
@vindex dired-bibtex-unclean-extensions
......
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