Commit c1f04bcf authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Fix description of emacsclientw.exe.

 msdog.texi (Windows Startup): Correct inaccurate description of
 differences between emacsclient.exe and emacsclientw.exe.
parent d3fbe87e
2011-01-07 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* msdog.texi (Windows Startup): Correct inaccurate description of
differences between emacsclient.exe and emacsclientw.exe.
2010-12-30 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* rmail.texi (Rmail Display): Edit for grammar and conciseness.
......
......@@ -90,20 +90,24 @@ Via the Emacs client program, @file{emacsclient.exe} or
programs, and to reuse a running Emacs process for serving editing
jobs required by other programs. @xref{Emacs Server}. The difference
between @file{emacsclient.exe} and @file{emacsclientw.exe} is that the
former waits for Emacs to signal that the editing job is finished,
while the latter does not wait. Which one of them to use in each case
depends on the expectations of the program that needs editing
services. If the program will use the edited files, it needs to wait
for Emacs, so you should use @file{emacsclient.exe}. By contrast, if
the results of editing are not needed by the invoking program, you
will be better off using @file{emacsclientw.exe}. A notable situation
where you would want @file{emacsclientw.exe} is when you right-click
on a file in the Windows Explorer and select ``Open With'' from the
pop-up menu. Use the @samp{--alternate-editor=} or @samp{-a} options
if Emacs might not be running (or not running as a server) when
@command{emacsclient} is invoked---that will always give you an
editor. When invoked via @command{emacsclient}, Emacs will start in
the current directory of the program that invoked
former is a console program, while the latter is a Windows GUI
program. Both programs wait for Emacs to signal that the editing job
is finished, before they exit and return control to the program that
invoked them. Which one of them to use in each case depends on the
expectations of the program that needs editing services. If that
program is itself a console (text-mode) program, you should use
@file{emacsclient.exe}, so that any of its messages and prompts appear
in the same command window as those of the invoking program. By
contrast, if the invoking program is a GUI program, you will be better
off using @file{emacsclientw.exe}, because @file{emacsclient.exe} will
pop up a command window if it is invoked from a GUI program. A
notable situation where you would want @file{emacsclientw.exe} is when
you right-click on a file in the Windows Explorer and select ``Open
With'' from the pop-up menu. Use the @samp{--alternate-editor=} or
@samp{-a} options if Emacs might not be running (or not running as a
server) when @command{emacsclient} is invoked---that will always give
you an editor. When invoked via @command{emacsclient}, Emacs will
start in the current directory of the program that invoked
@command{emacsclient}.
@end enumerate
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