Commit c49f972f authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Various cleanups.

parent 204b78de
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ particular date; @kbd{Mouse-3} brings up a menu of commonly used
calendar features that are independent of any particular date. To exit
the calendar, type @kbd{q}.
The basic features of the Calendar/Diary are described here.
This chapter describes the basic calendar features.
@inforef{Advanced Calendar/Diary Usage,, emacs-xtra}, for information
about more specialized features.
......@@ -49,13 +49,13 @@ about more specialized features.
@section Movement in the Calendar
@cindex moving inside the calendar
Calendar mode lets you move through the calendar in logical units of
time such as days, weeks, months, and years. If you move outside the
three months originally displayed, the calendar display ``scrolls''
automatically through time to make the selected date visible. Moving to
a date lets you view its holidays or diary entries, or convert it to other
calendars; moving longer time periods is also useful simply to scroll the
calendar.
Calendar mode provides commands to move through the calendar in
logical units of time such as days, weeks, months, and years. If you
move outside the three months originally displayed, the calendar
display ``scrolls'' automatically through time to make the selected
date visible. Moving to a date lets you view its holidays or diary
entries, or convert it to other calendars; moving by long time periods
is also useful simply to scroll the calendar.
@menu
* Calendar Unit Motion:: Moving by days, weeks, months, and years.
......@@ -117,16 +117,16 @@ moves to the same day in the previous week.
@findex calendar-forward-year
The commands for motion by months and years work like those for
weeks, but move a larger distance. The month commands @kbd{M-@}} and
@kbd{M-@{} move forward or backward by an entire month's time. The
year commands @kbd{C-x ]} and @w{@kbd{C-x [}} move forward or backward a
@kbd{M-@{} move forward or backward by an entire month. The year
commands @kbd{C-x ]} and @w{@kbd{C-x [}} move forward or backward a
whole year.
The easiest way to remember these commands is to consider months and
years analogous to paragraphs and pages of text, respectively. But the
commands themselves are not quite analogous. The ordinary Emacs paragraph
commands move to the beginning or end of a paragraph, whereas these month
and year commands move by an entire month or an entire year, which usually
involves skipping across the end of a month or year.
years analogous to paragraphs and pages of text, respectively. But
the commands themselves are not quite analogous. The ordinary Emacs
paragraph commands move to the beginning or end of a paragraph,
whereas these month and year commands move by an entire month or an
entire year, keeping the same date within the month or year.
All these commands accept a numeric argument as a repeat count.
For convenience, the digit keys and the minus sign specify numeric
......@@ -313,8 +313,8 @@ Exit from calendar (@code{exit-calendar}).
To display the number of days elapsed since the start of the year, or
the number of days remaining in the year, type the @kbd{p d} command
(@code{calendar-print-day-of-year}). This displays both of those
numbers in the echo area. The number of days elapsed includes the
selected date. The number of days remaining does not include that
numbers in the echo area. The count of days elapsed includes the
selected date. The count of days remaining does not include that
date.
@kindex C-c C-l @r{(Calendar mode)}
......@@ -432,8 +432,7 @@ date in the calendar window and use the @kbd{h} command. Alternatively,
click on that date with @kbd{Mouse-2} and then choose @kbd{Holidays}
from the menu that appears. Either way, this displays the holidays for
that date, in the echo area if they fit there, otherwise in a separate
window. If the variable @code{view-calendar-holidays-initially} is
non-@code{nil}, creating the calendar displays holidays in this way.
window.
@kindex x @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex mark-calendar-holidays
......@@ -462,9 +461,11 @@ calendar window to scroll that list up and down, respectively.
@findex holidays
The command @kbd{M-x holidays} displays the list of holidays for the
current month and the preceding and succeeding months; this works even
if you don't have a calendar window. If you want the list of holidays
centered around a different month, use @kbd{C-u M-x holidays}, which
prompts for the month and year.
if you don't have a calendar window. If the variable
@code{view-calendar-holidays-initially} is non-@code{nil}, creating
the calendar displays holidays in this way. If you want the list of
holidays centered around a different month, use @kbd{C-u M-x
holidays}, which prompts for the month and year.
The holidays known to Emacs include United States holidays and the
major Christian, Jewish, and Islamic holidays; also the solstices and
......@@ -1017,7 +1018,7 @@ following day.
@kbd{Mouse-2} on the date, and then choose @kbd{Diary entries} from
the menu that appears. If the variable
@code{view-diary-entries-initially} is non-@code{nil}, creating the
calendar also lists diary entries for the current date (provided the
calendar lists the diary entries for the current date (provided the
current date is visible).
@kindex m @r{(Calendar mode)}
......@@ -1371,10 +1372,10 @@ begins with a recognizable time of day, Emacs can warn you several
minutes beforehand that that appointment is pending. Emacs alerts you
to the appointment by displaying a message in your chosen format, as
specified by the variable @code{appt-display-format}. If the value of
@code{appt-audible} is non-@code{nil}, an audible reminder is also
given. In addition, if @code{appt-display-mode-line} is non-@code{nil},
Emacs displays the number of minutes to the appointment on the mode
line.
@code{appt-audible} is non-@code{nil}, the warning includes an audible
reminder. In addition, if @code{appt-display-mode-line} is
non-@code{nil}, Emacs displays the number of minutes to the
appointment on the mode line.
@vindex appt-display-duration
@vindex appt-disp-window-function
......@@ -1387,12 +1388,12 @@ give the names of functions used to create and destroy the window,
respectively.
@findex appt-activate
To enable appointment notification, call the function
@code{appt-activate} with a positive argument. This sets up an
appointment list for today from the diary file, giving all diary entries
found with recognizable times of day, and reminds you just before each
of them. Calling @code{appt-activate} with a negative argument disables
the appointment package. With no argument, it toggles.
To enable appointment notification, use the command @kbd{M-x
appt-activate}. With a positive argument, it enables notification;
with a negative argument, it disables notification; with no argument,
it toggles. Enabling notification also sets up an appointment list
for today from the diary file, giving all diary entries found with
recognizable times of day, and reminds you just before each of them.
For example, suppose the diary file contains these lines:
......@@ -1404,10 +1405,10 @@ Monday
@vindex appt-message-warning-time
@noindent
Then on Mondays, you will be reminded at around 9:20am about your coffee
break and at around 11:50am about lunch. How many minutes in advance you
are first warned is determined by the value of
@code{appt-message-warning-time}.
Then on Mondays, you will be reminded at around 9:20am about your
coffee break and at around 11:50am about lunch. The variable
@code{appt-message-warning-time} specifies how many minutes in advance
to warn you; its default value is 12 (12 minutes).
You can write times in am/pm style (with @samp{12:00am} standing
for midnight and @samp{12:00pm} standing for noon), or 24-hour
......@@ -1416,12 +1417,12 @@ can have a mixture of the two styles. Times must be at the beginning
of lines if they are to be recognized.
@vindex appt-display-diary
Emacs updates the appointments list from the diary file automatically
just after midnight. An update can be forced at any time by
re-activating the appointment package. Both these actions also display
the day's diary buffer, unless you set @code{appt-display-diary} to
@code{nil}. The appointments list is also updated whenever the
diary file is saved.
Emacs updates the appointments list from the diary file
automatically just after midnight. You can force an update at any
time by re-enabling appointment notification. Both these actions also
display the day's diary buffer, unless you set
@code{appt-display-diary} to @code{nil}. The appointments list is
also updated whenever the diary file is saved.
@findex appt-add
@findex appt-delete
......@@ -1450,11 +1451,11 @@ diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
2445---Internet Calendaring and Scheduling Core Object Specification
(iCalendar)'' (as well as the earlier vCalendar format).
Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e. non-recurring) events, but (at
present) may not work correctly (if at all) for recurring events.
Exporting of diary files into iCalendar files should work correctly for
most diary entries. Please note that @file{icalendar.el} is work in
progress, so usage may evolve in future.
Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e. non-recurring) events, but
(at present) may not work correctly (if at all) for recurring events.
Exporting of diary files into iCalendar files should work correctly
for most diary entries. This feature is a work in progress, so the
commands may evolve in future.
@findex icalendar-import-buffer
The command @code{icalendar-import-buffer} extracts
......@@ -1476,7 +1477,7 @@ and adds the results to an Emacs diary file. For example:
@noindent
You can use an @code{#include} directive to add the import file contents
to the main diary file, if these are distinct. @inforef{Fancy Diary
to the main diary file, if these are different files. @inforef{Fancy Diary
Display,, emacs-xtra}.
@findex icalendar-export-file, icalendar-export-region
......@@ -1485,7 +1486,6 @@ Emacs diary file to iCalendar format. To export only a part of a diary
file, mark the relevant area, and call @code{icalendar-export-region}.
In both cases the result is appended to the target file.
@node Daylight Savings
@section Daylight Savings Time
@cindex daylight savings time
......@@ -1560,7 +1560,8 @@ values are 120.
@cindex timeclock
The timeclock feature adds up time intervals, so you can (for
instance) keep track of how much time you spend working.
instance) keep track of how much time you spend working on particular
projects.
@findex timeclock-in
@findex timeclock-out
......@@ -1586,11 +1587,11 @@ workday in the mode line, either customize the
@code{t}, or invoke the @kbd{M-x timeclock-modeline-display} command.
@vindex timeclock-ask-before-exiting
Terminating the current Emacs session might or might not mean that you
have stopped working on the project and, by default, Emacs queries this.
You can, however, set the value of the variable
Terminating the current Emacs session might or might not mean that
you have stopped working on the project and, by default, Emacs asks
you. You can, however, set the value of the variable
@code{timeclock-ask-before-exiting} to @code{nil} (via @kbd{M-x
customize}) to avoid this behavior; then, only an explicit @kbd{M-x
customize}) to avoid the question; then, only an explicit @kbd{M-x
timeclock-out} or @kbd{M-x timeclock-change} will tell Emacs that the
current interval is over.
......
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