Commit c88b867f authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

Misc doc fixes.

* searching.texi (Replacing Match): Minor clarification.

* lisp/repeat.el (repeat): Doc fix.

* lisp/simple.el (shell-command-on-region): Doc fix.

* lisp/emacs-lisp/easy-mmode.el (define-minor-mode): Doc fix.

* cmds.c (Fforward_char, Fbackward_char): Doc fix.

* editfns.c (Fline_beginning_position): Doc fix.
(Fline_end_position): Doc fix.

* minibuf.c (Finternal_complete_buffer): Doc fix.

* search.c (Freplace_match): Doc fix.

Fixes: debbugs:12325 debbugs:12391 debbugs:12416 debbugs:12414 debbugs:10909 debbugs:12348
parent bb4d86b4
2012-09-22 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* searching.texi (Replacing Match): Minor clarification.
2012-09-22 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* edebug.texi (Instrumenting): Improve indexing.
......
......@@ -1278,20 +1278,18 @@ search. It works by means of the match data.
@cindex case in replacements
@defun replace-match replacement &optional fixedcase literal string subexp
This function replaces the text in the buffer (or in @var{string}) that
was matched by the last search. It replaces that text with
@var{replacement}.
If you did the last search in a buffer, you should specify @code{nil}
for @var{string} and make sure that the current buffer when you call
@code{replace-match} is the one in which you did the searching or
matching. Then @code{replace-match} does the replacement by editing
the buffer; it leaves point at the end of the replacement text, and
returns @code{t}.
If you did the search in a string, pass the same string as @var{string}.
Then @code{replace-match} does the replacement by constructing and
returning a new string.
This function performs a replacement operation on a buffer or string.
If you did the last search in a buffer, you should omit the
@var{string} argument or specify @code{nil} for it, and make sure that
the current buffer is the one in which you performed the last search.
Then this function edits the buffer, replacing the matched text with
@var{replacement}. It leaves point at the end of the replacement
text, and returns @code{t}.
If you performed the last search on a string, pass the same string as
@var{string}. Then this function returns a new string, in which the
matched text is replaced by @var{replacement}.
If @var{fixedcase} is non-@code{nil}, then @code{replace-match} uses
the replacement text without case conversion; otherwise, it converts
......
2012-09-22 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* repeat.el (repeat): Doc fix (Bug#12348).
* emacs-lisp/easy-mmode.el (define-minor-mode): Doc fix
(Bug#10909).
* simple.el (shell-command-on-region): Doc fix.
2012-09-22 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* emacs-lisp/timer.el (run-with-idle-timer)
......
......@@ -90,12 +90,17 @@ MODE (you can override this with the :variable keyword, see below).
DOC is the documentation for the mode toggle command.
The defined mode command takes one optional (prefix) argument.
Interactively with no prefix argument it toggles the mode.
With a prefix argument, it enables the mode if the argument is
positive and otherwise disables it. When called from Lisp, it
enables the mode if the argument is omitted or nil, and toggles
the mode if the argument is `toggle'. If DOC is nil this
function adds a basic doc-string stating these facts.
Interactively with no prefix argument, it toggles the mode.
A prefix argument enables the mode if the argument is positive,
and disables it otherwise.
When called from Lisp, the mode command toggles the mode if the
argument is `toggle', disables the mode if the argument is a
non-positive integer, and enables the mode otherwise (including
if the argument is omitted or nil or a positive integer).
If DOC is nil, give the mode command a basic doc-string
documenting what its argument does.
Optional INIT-VALUE is the initial value of the mode's variable.
Optional LIGHTER is displayed in the mode line when the mode is on.
......
......@@ -193,9 +193,9 @@ this function is always whether the value of `this-command' would've been
;;;###autoload
(defun repeat (repeat-arg)
"Repeat most recently executed command.
With prefix arg, apply new prefix arg to that command; otherwise,
use the prefix arg that was used before (if any).
This command is like the `.' command in the vi editor.
If REPEAT-ARG is non-nil (interactively, with a prefix argument),
supply a prefix argument to that command. Otherwise, give the
command the same prefix argument it was given before, if any.
If this command is invoked by a multi-character key sequence, it
can then be repeated by repeating the final character of that
......
......@@ -2604,8 +2604,6 @@ is encoded using coding-system specified by `process-coding-system-alist',
falling back to `default-process-coding-system' if no match for COMMAND
is found in `process-coding-system-alist'.
The noninteractive arguments are START, END, COMMAND,
OUTPUT-BUFFER, REPLACE, ERROR-BUFFER, and DISPLAY-ERROR-BUFFER.
Noninteractive callers can specify coding systems by binding
`coding-system-for-read' and `coding-system-for-write'.
......@@ -2613,34 +2611,34 @@ If the command generates output, the output may be displayed
in the echo area or in a buffer.
If the output is short enough to display in the echo area
\(determined by the variable `max-mini-window-height' if
`resize-mini-windows' is non-nil), it is shown there. Otherwise
it is displayed in the buffer `*Shell Command Output*'. The output
is available in that buffer in both cases.
`resize-mini-windows' is non-nil), it is shown there.
Otherwise it is displayed in the buffer `*Shell Command Output*'.
The output is available in that buffer in both cases.
If there is output and an error, a message about the error
appears at the end of the output.
If there is no output, or if output is inserted in the current buffer,
then `*Shell Command Output*' is deleted.
If the optional fourth argument OUTPUT-BUFFER is non-nil,
that says to put the output in some other buffer.
If OUTPUT-BUFFER is a buffer or buffer name, put the output there.
If OUTPUT-BUFFER is not a buffer and not nil,
insert output in the current buffer.
In either case, the output is inserted after point (leaving mark after it).
If REPLACE, the optional fifth argument, is non-nil, that means insert
the output in place of text from START to END, putting point and mark
appears at the end of the output. If there is no output, or if
output is inserted in the current buffer, the buffer `*Shell
Command Output*' is deleted.
Optional fourth arg OUTPUT-BUFFER specifies where to put the
command's output. If the value is a buffer or buffer name, put
the output there. Any other value, including nil, means to
insert the output in the current buffer. In either case, the
output is inserted after point (leaving mark after it).
Optional fifth arg REPLACE, if non-nil, means to insert the
output in place of text from START to END, putting point and mark
around it.
If optional sixth argument ERROR-BUFFER is non-nil, it is a buffer
or buffer name to which to direct the command's standard error output.
If it is nil, error output is mingled with regular output.
If DISPLAY-ERROR-BUFFER is non-nil, display the error buffer if there
were any errors. (This is always t, interactively.)
In an interactive call, the variable `shell-command-default-error-buffer'
specifies the value of ERROR-BUFFER."
Optional sixth arg ERROR-BUFFER, if non-nil, specifies a buffer
or buffer name to which to direct the command's standard error
output. If nil, error output is mingled with regular output.
When called interactively, `shell-command-default-error-buffer'
is used for ERROR-BUFFER.
Optional seventh arg DISPLAY-ERROR-BUFFER, if non-nil, means to
display the error buffer if there were any errors. When called
interactively, this is t."
(interactive (let (string)
(unless (mark)
(error "The mark is not set now, so there is no region"))
......
2012-09-22 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* search.c (Freplace_match): Doc fix (Bug#12325).
* minibuf.c (Finternal_complete_buffer): Doc fix (Bug#12391).
* editfns.c (Fline_beginning_position): Doc fix (Bug#12416).
(Fline_end_position): Doc fix.
* cmds.c (Fforward_char, Fbackward_char): Doc fix (Bug#12414).
2012-09-22 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* dispextern.h (struct image_type): Add new slot, storing a type
......
......@@ -85,6 +85,7 @@ move_point (Lisp_Object n, bool forward)
DEFUN ("forward-char", Fforward_char, Sforward_char, 0, 1, "^p",
doc: /* Move point N characters forward (backward if N is negative).
On reaching end or beginning of buffer, stop and signal error.
Interactively, N is the numeric prefix argument.
Depending on the bidirectional context, the movement may be to the
right or to the left on the screen. This is in contrast with
......@@ -97,6 +98,7 @@ right or to the left on the screen. This is in contrast with
DEFUN ("backward-char", Fbackward_char, Sbackward_char, 0, 1, "^p",
doc: /* Move point N characters backward (forward if N is negative).
On attempt to pass beginning or end of buffer, stop and signal error.
Interactively, N is the numeric prefix argument.
Depending on the bidirectional context, the movement may be to the
right or to the left on the screen. This is in contrast with
......
......@@ -738,17 +738,18 @@ Field boundaries are not noticed if `inhibit-field-text-motion' is non-nil. */)
DEFUN ("line-beginning-position",
Fline_beginning_position, Sline_beginning_position, 0, 1, 0,
doc: /* Return the character position of the first character on the current line.
With argument N not nil or 1, move forward N - 1 lines first.
If scan reaches end of buffer, return that position.
With optional argument N, scan forward N - 1 lines first.
If the scan reaches the end of the buffer, return that position.
The returned position is of the first character in the logical order,
i.e. the one that has the smallest character position.
This function ignores text display directionality; it returns the
position of the first character in logical order, i.e. the smallest
character position on the line.
This function constrains the returned position to the current field
unless that would be on a different line than the original,
unless that position would be on a different line than the original,
unconstrained result. If N is nil or 1, and a front-sticky field
starts at point, the scan stops as soon as it starts. To ignore field
boundaries bind `inhibit-field-text-motion' to t.
boundaries, bind `inhibit-field-text-motion' to t.
This function does not move point. */)
(Lisp_Object n)
......@@ -782,8 +783,9 @@ DEFUN ("line-end-position", Fline_end_position, Sline_end_position, 0, 1, 0,
With argument N not nil or 1, move forward N - 1 lines first.
If scan reaches end of buffer, return that position.
The returned position is of the last character in the logical order,
i.e. the character whose buffer position is the largest one.
This function ignores text display directionality; it returns the
position of the last character in logical order, i.e. the largest
character position on the line.
This function constrains the returned position to the current field
unless that would be on a different line than the original,
......
......@@ -1862,11 +1862,11 @@ static Lisp_Object Qmetadata;
DEFUN ("internal-complete-buffer", Finternal_complete_buffer, Sinternal_complete_buffer, 3, 3, 0,
doc: /* Perform completion on buffer names.
If the argument FLAG is nil, invoke `try-completion', if it's t, invoke
`all-completions', otherwise invoke `test-completion'.
STRING and PREDICATE have the same meanings as in `try-completion',
`all-completions', and `test-completion'.
The arguments STRING and PREDICATE are as in `try-completion',
`all-completions', and `test-completion'. */)
If FLAG is nil, invoke `try-completion'; if it is t, invoke
`all-completions'; otherwise invoke `test-completion'. */)
(Lisp_Object string, Lisp_Object predicate, Lisp_Object flag)
{
if (NILP (flag))
......
......@@ -2220,15 +2220,14 @@ DEFUN ("replace-match", Freplace_match, Sreplace_match, 1, 5, 0,
doc: /* Replace text matched by last search with NEWTEXT.
Leave point at the end of the replacement text.
If second arg FIXEDCASE is non-nil, do not alter case of replacement text.
Otherwise maybe capitalize the whole text, or maybe just word initials,
based on the replaced text.
If the replaced text has only capital letters
and has at least one multiletter word, convert NEWTEXT to all caps.
Otherwise if all words are capitalized in the replaced text,
capitalize each word in NEWTEXT.
If third arg LITERAL is non-nil, insert NEWTEXT literally.
If optional second arg FIXEDCASE is non-nil, do not alter the case of
the replacement text. Otherwise, maybe capitalize the whole text, or
maybe just word initials, based on the replaced text. If the replaced
text has only capital letters and has at least one multiletter word,
convert NEWTEXT to all caps. Otherwise if all words are capitalized
in the replaced text, capitalize each word in NEWTEXT.
If optional third arg LITERAL is non-nil, insert NEWTEXT literally.
Otherwise treat `\\' as special:
`\\&' in NEWTEXT means substitute original matched text.
`\\N' means substitute what matched the Nth `\\(...\\)'.
......@@ -2239,13 +2238,11 @@ Otherwise treat `\\' as special:
Any other character following `\\' signals an error.
Case conversion does not apply to these substitutions.
FIXEDCASE and LITERAL are optional arguments.
The optional fourth argument STRING can be a string to modify.
This is meaningful when the previous match was done against STRING,
using `string-match'. When used this way, `replace-match'
creates and returns a new string made by copying STRING and replacing
the part of STRING that was matched.
If optional fourth argument STRING is non-nil, it should be a string
to act on; this should be the string on which the previous match was
done via `string-match'. In this case, `replace-match' creates and
returns a new string, made by copying STRING and replacing the part of
STRING that was matched (the original STRING itself is not altered).
The optional fifth argument SUBEXP specifies a subexpression;
it says to replace just that subexpression with NEWTEXT,
......
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