Commit cf107ffb authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

(Printed Representation): Minor cleanup.

(Box Diagrams): Minor fix.
(Cons Cell Type): Move (...) index item here.
(Box Diagrams): From here.
(Array Type): Minor fix.
(Type Predicates): Delete index "predicates".
(Hash Table Type): Clarify xref.
(Dotted Pair Notation): Minor fix.
parent ec8d89ec
......@@ -78,10 +78,10 @@ syntax. @xref{Read and Print}.
In most cases, an object's printed representation is also a read
syntax for the object. However, some types have no read syntax, since
it does not make sense to enter objects of these types as constants in
a Lisp program. These objects are printed in @dfn{hash notation}: the
characters @samp{#<} followed by a descriptive string (typically the
type name followed by the name of the object), and closed with a
matching @samp{>}. For example:
a Lisp program. These objects are printed in @dfn{hash notation},
which consists of the characters @samp{#<}, a descriptive string
(typically the type name followed by the name of the object), and a
closing @samp{>}. For example:
@example
(current-buffer)
......@@ -621,6 +621,7 @@ come to refer to any structure made out of cons cells.
@dfn{atoms}.
@cindex parenthesis
@cindex @samp{(@dots{})} in lists
The read syntax and printed representation for lists are identical, and
consist of a left parenthesis, an arbitrary number of elements, and a
right parenthesis. Here are examples of lists:
......@@ -706,7 +707,6 @@ buttercup)}, sketched in a different manner:
@end group
@end smallexample
@cindex @samp{(@dots{})} in lists
@cindex @code{nil} in lists
@cindex empty list
A list with no elements in it is the @dfn{empty list}; it is identical
......@@ -749,7 +749,7 @@ two-element list:
@end group
@end example
The same list represented in the first box notation looks like this:
The same list represented in the second box notation looks like this:
@example
@group
......@@ -776,7 +776,7 @@ two-element list:
@dfn{Dotted pair notation} is a general syntax for cons cells that
represents the @sc{car} and @sc{cdr} explicitly. In this syntax,
@code{(@var{a} .@: @var{b})} stands for a cons cell whose @sc{car} is
the object @var{a}, and whose @sc{cdr} is the object @var{b}. Dotted
the object @var{a} and whose @sc{cdr} is the object @var{b}. Dotted
pair notation is more general than list syntax because the @sc{cdr}
does not have to be a list. However, it is more cumbersome in cases
where list syntax would work. In dotted pair notation, the list
......@@ -913,9 +913,9 @@ you can get the same effect with nested one-dimensional arrays.) Each
type of array has its own read syntax; see the following sections for
details.
The array type is contained in the sequence type and
contains the string type, the vector type, the bool-vector type, and the
char-table type.
The array type is a subset of the sequence type, and contains the
string type, the vector type, the bool-vector type, and the char-table
type.
@node String Type
@subsection String Type
......@@ -1166,8 +1166,8 @@ only the first 3 bits are used:
A hash table is a very fast kind of lookup table, somewhat like an
alist in that it maps keys to corresponding values, but much faster.
Hash tables have no read syntax, and
print using hash notation. @xref{Hash Tables}.
Hash tables have no read syntax, and print using hash notation.
@xref{Hash Tables}, for functions that operate on hash tables.
@example
(make-hash-table)
......@@ -1607,7 +1607,6 @@ to a non-@code{nil} value. @xref{Output Variables}.
@node Type Predicates
@section Type Predicates
@cindex predicates
@cindex type checking
@kindex wrong-type-argument
......@@ -1942,6 +1941,7 @@ always true.
@end group
@end example
@cindex equality of strings
Comparison of strings is case-sensitive, but does not take account of
text properties---it compares only the characters in the strings. For
technical reasons, a unibyte string and a multibyte string are
......
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