Commit d239287a authored by Luc Teirlinck's avatar Luc Teirlinck
Browse files

Various minor changes.

(Faces): Delete text that is repeated in the next section.
parent 2fde1500
2005-05-16 Luc Teirlinck <teirllm@auburn.edu>
* display.texi: Various minor changes.
(Faces): Delete text that is repeated in the next section.
2005-05-16 Nick Roberts <nickrob@snap.net.nz>
* building.texi (Debugger Operation): Mention GUD tooltips are
......
......@@ -177,13 +177,9 @@ style of this face (@pxref{Face Customization}). @xref{Transient Mark},
for more information about Transient Mark mode and activation and
deactivation of the mark.
One easy way to use faces is to turn on Font Lock mode. This minor
mode, which is always local to a particular buffer, arranges to
choose faces according to the syntax of the text you are editing. It
can recognize comments and strings in most languages; in several
languages, it can also recognize and properly highlight various other
important constructs. @xref{Font Lock}, for more information about
Font Lock mode and syntactic highlighting.
One easy way to use faces is to turn on Font Lock mode. @xref{Font
Lock}, for more information about Font Lock mode and syntactic
highlighting.
You can print out the buffer with the highlighting that appears
on your screen using the command @code{ps-print-buffer-with-faces}.
......@@ -206,11 +202,12 @@ specialized ways of assigning fonts for Font Lock mode.
@findex font-lock-mode
@findex turn-on-font-lock
The command @kbd{M-x font-lock-mode} turns Font Lock mode on or off
according to the argument, and toggles the mode when it has no argument.
The function @code{turn-on-font-lock} unconditionally enables Font Lock
mode. This is useful in mode-hook functions. For example, to enable
Font Lock mode whenever you edit a C file, you can do this:
The command @kbd{M-x font-lock-mode} turns Font Lock mode on with
positive argument, off with negative or zero argument, and toggles the
mode when it has no argument. The function @code{turn-on-font-lock}
unconditionally enables Font Lock mode. This is useful in mode-hook
functions. For example, to enable Font Lock mode whenever you edit a
C file, you can do this:
@example
(add-hook 'c-mode-hook 'turn-on-font-lock)
......@@ -219,9 +216,9 @@ Font Lock mode whenever you edit a C file, you can do this:
@findex global-font-lock-mode
@vindex global-font-lock-mode
To turn on Font Lock mode automatically in all modes which support
it, customize the variable @code{global-font-lock-mode} or use the
function @code{global-font-lock-mode} in your @file{.emacs} file, like
this:
it, customize the variable @code{global-font-lock-mode} using the
Customize interface (@pxref{Easy Customization}) or use the function
@code{global-font-lock-mode} in your @file{.emacs} file, like this:
@example
(global-font-lock-mode 1)
......@@ -641,7 +638,7 @@ last, indicating that ``this is not the real end.''
meaning ``there's more text on this line which is scrolled
horizontally out of view;'' clicking the mouse on one of the arrows
scrolls the display horizontally in the direction of the arrow. The
fringes also indicate other things such as empty lines, or where a
fringes can also indicate other things, such as empty lines, or where a
program you are debugging is executing (@pxref{Debuggers}).
@findex set-fringe-style
......@@ -728,11 +725,12 @@ one large window.
of columns (you specify how many columns). You can use this to get an
overview of a part of a program.
To hide lines, type @kbd{C-x $} (@code{set-selective-display}) with a
numeric argument @var{n}. Then lines with at least @var{n} columns of
indentation disappear from the screen. The only indication of their
presence is that three dots (@samp{@dots{}}) appear at the end of each
visible line that is followed by one or more hidden ones.
To hide lines in the current buffer, type @kbd{C-x $}
(@code{set-selective-display}) with a numeric argument @var{n}. Then
lines with at least @var{n} columns of indentation disappear from the
screen. The only indication of their presence is that three dots
(@samp{@dots{}}) appear at the end of each visible line that is
followed by one or more hidden ones.
The commands @kbd{C-n} and @kbd{C-p} move across the hidden lines as
if they were not there.
......
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