Commit d24880de authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Untabify doc/lispref/*.texi.

* abbrevs.texi, commands.texi, compile.texi, debugging.texi:
* display.texi, edebug.texi, elisp.texi, eval.texi, files.texi:
* frames.texi, functions.texi, internals.texi, keymaps.texi:
* loading.texi, minibuf.texi, numbers.texi, os.texi, processes.texi:
* searching.texi, sequences.texi, strings.texi, syntax.texi:
* text.texi, tips.texi, vol1.texi, vol2.texi, windows.texi:
Untabify Texinfo files.
parent 2c79f053
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001,
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/sequences
@node Sequences Arrays Vectors, Hash Tables, Lists, Top
......@@ -669,13 +670,13 @@ For example, here is how to examine the elements of the syntax table:
(let (accumulator)
(map-char-table
#'(lambda (key value)
(setq accumulator
(cons (list
(if (consp key)
(list (car key) (cdr key))
key)
value)
accumulator)))
(setq accumulator
(cons (list
(if (consp key)
(list (car key) (cdr key))
key)
value)
accumulator)))
(syntax-table))
accumulator)
@result{}
......
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001,
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/strings
@node Strings and Characters, Lists, Numbers, Top
......@@ -31,7 +32,7 @@ keyboard character events.
* String Conversion:: Converting to and from characters and strings.
* Formatting Strings:: @code{format}: Emacs's analogue of @code{printf}.
* Case Conversion:: Case conversion functions.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
@end menu
@node String Basics
......
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001,
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/syntax
@node Syntax Tables, Abbrevs, Searching and Matching, Top
......@@ -23,7 +24,7 @@ functions in this chapter.
* Desc: Syntax Descriptors. How characters are classified.
* Syntax Table Functions:: How to create, examine and alter syntax tables.
* Syntax Properties:: Overriding syntax with text properties.
* Motion and Syntax:: Moving over characters with certain syntaxes.
* Motion and Syntax:: Moving over characters with certain syntaxes.
* Parsing Expressions:: Parsing balanced expressions
using the syntax table.
* Standard Syntax Tables:: Syntax tables used by various major modes.
......
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001,
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/text
@node Text, Non-ASCII Characters, Markers, Top
......@@ -42,7 +43,7 @@ the character after point.
* The Kill Ring:: Where removed text sometimes is saved for later use.
* Undo:: Undoing changes to the text of a buffer.
* Maintaining Undo:: How to enable and disable undo information.
How to control how much information is kept.
How to control how much information is kept.
* Filling:: Functions for explicit filling.
* Margins:: How to specify margins for filling commands.
* Adaptive Fill:: Adaptive Fill mode chooses a fill prefix from context.
......@@ -821,7 +822,7 @@ would be difficult to change the terminology now.
* Kill Functions:: Functions that kill text.
* Yanking:: How yanking is done.
* Yank Commands:: Commands that access the kill ring.
* Low-Level Kill Ring:: Functions and variables for kill ring access.
* Low-Level Kill Ring:: Functions and variables for kill ring access.
* Internals of Kill Ring:: Variables that hold kill ring data.
@end menu
......@@ -2593,9 +2594,9 @@ along with the characters; this includes such diverse functions as
@menu
* Examining Properties:: Looking at the properties of one character.
* Changing Properties:: Setting the properties of a range of text.
* Property Search:: Searching for where a property changes value.
* Special Properties:: Particular properties with special meanings.
* Changing Properties:: Setting the properties of a range of text.
* Property Search:: Searching for where a property changes value.
* Special Properties:: Particular properties with special meanings.
* Format Properties:: Properties for representing formatting of text.
* Sticky Properties:: How inserted text gets properties from
neighboring text.
......@@ -2605,8 +2606,8 @@ along with the characters; this includes such diverse functions as
do something when you click on them.
* Fields:: The @code{field} property defines
fields within the buffer.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
Lisp-visible text intervals.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
Lisp-visible text intervals.
@end menu
@node Examining Properties
......
@c -*-texinfo-*-
@c This is part of the GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual.
@c Copyright (C) 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002,
@c 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
@c Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@c See the file elisp.texi for copying conditions.
@setfilename ../../info/tips
@node Tips, GNU Emacs Internals, GPL, Top
......@@ -28,7 +29,7 @@ all.
* Compilation Tips:: Making compiled code run fast.
* Warning Tips:: Turning off compiler warnings.
* Documentation Tips:: Writing readable documentation strings.
* Comment Tips:: Conventions for writing comments.
* Comment Tips:: Conventions for writing comments.
* Library Headers:: Standard headers for library packages.
@end menu
......
......@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
files are made.
* Buffers:: Creating and using buffer objects.
* Windows:: Manipulating windows and displaying buffers.
* Frames:: Making multiple system-level windows.
* Frames:: Making multiple system-level windows.
* Positions:: Buffer positions and motion functions.
* Markers:: Markers represent positions and update
automatically when the text is changed.
......@@ -176,7 +176,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
* Abbrevs:: How Abbrev mode works, and its data structures.
* Processes:: Running and communicating with subprocesses.
* Display:: Features for controlling the screen display.
* Display:: Features for controlling the screen display.
* System Interface:: Getting the user id, system type, environment
variables, and other such things.
......@@ -311,10 +311,10 @@ Editing Types
Numbers
* Integer Basics:: Representation and range of integers.
* Float Basics:: Representation and range of floating point.
* Float Basics:: Representation and range of floating point.
* Predicates on Numbers:: Testing for numbers.
* Comparison of Numbers:: Equality and inequality predicates.
* Numeric Conversions:: Converting float to integer and vice versa.
* Numeric Conversions:: Converting float to integer and vice versa.
* Arithmetic Operations:: How to add, subtract, multiply and divide.
* Rounding Operations:: Explicitly rounding floating point numbers.
* Bitwise Operations:: Logical and, or, not, shifting.
......@@ -331,7 +331,7 @@ Strings and Characters
* String Conversion:: Converting to and from characters and strings.
* Formatting Strings:: @code{format}: Emacs's analogue of @code{printf}.
* Case Conversion:: Case conversion functions.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
Lists
......@@ -399,7 +399,7 @@ Kinds of Forms
* Symbol Forms:: Symbols evaluate as variables.
* Classifying Lists:: How to distinguish various sorts of list forms.
* Function Indirection:: When a symbol appears as the car of a list,
we find the real function via the symbol.
we find the real function via the symbol.
* Function Forms:: Forms that call functions.
* Macro Forms:: Forms that call macros.
* Special Forms:: "Special forms" are idiosyncratic primitives,
......@@ -480,9 +480,9 @@ Functions
* Function Cells:: Accessing or setting the function definition
of a symbol.
* Obsolete Functions:: Declaring functions obsolete.
* Inline Functions:: Defining functions that the compiler
* Inline Functions:: Defining functions that the compiler
will open code.
* Declaring Functions:: Telling the compiler that a function is defined.
* Declaring Functions:: Telling the compiler that a function is defined.
* Function Safety:: Determining whether a function is safe to call.
* Related Topics:: Cross-references to specific Lisp primitives
that have a special bearing on how
......@@ -542,9 +542,9 @@ Loading
* Repeated Loading:: Precautions about loading a file twice.
* Named Features:: Loading a library if it isn't already loaded.
* Where Defined:: Finding which file defined a certain symbol.
* Unloading:: How to "unload" a library that was loaded.
* Hooks for Loading:: Providing code to be run when
particular libraries are loaded.
* Unloading:: How to "unload" a library that was loaded.
* Hooks for Loading:: Providing code to be run when
particular libraries are loaded.
Byte Compilation
......@@ -554,7 +554,7 @@ Byte Compilation
* Dynamic Loading:: Dynamic loading of individual functions.
* Eval During Compile:: Code to be evaluated when you compile.
* Compiler Errors:: Handling compiler error messages.
* Byte-Code Objects:: The data type used for byte-compiled functions.
* Byte-Code Objects:: The data type used for byte-compiled functions.
* Disassembly:: Disassembling byte-code; how to read byte-code.
Advising Emacs Lisp Functions
......@@ -583,7 +583,7 @@ Debugging Lisp Programs
The Lisp Debugger
* Error Debugging:: Entering the debugger when an error happens.
* Infinite Loops:: Stopping and debugging a program that doesn't exit.
* Infinite Loops:: Stopping and debugging a program that doesn't exit.
* Function Debugging:: Entering it when a certain function is called.
* Explicit Debug:: Entering it at a certain point in the program.
* Using Debugger:: What the debugger does; what you see while in it.
......@@ -593,24 +593,24 @@ The Lisp Debugger
Edebug
* Using Edebug:: Introduction to use of Edebug.
* Instrumenting:: You must instrument your code
in order to debug it with Edebug.
* Using Edebug:: Introduction to use of Edebug.
* Instrumenting:: You must instrument your code
in order to debug it with Edebug.
* Edebug Execution Modes:: Execution modes, stopping more or less often.
* Jumping:: Commands to jump to a specified place.
* Edebug Misc:: Miscellaneous commands.
* Breaks:: Setting breakpoints to make the program stop.
* Trapping Errors:: Trapping errors with Edebug.
* Edebug Views:: Views inside and outside of Edebug.
* Edebug Eval:: Evaluating expressions within Edebug.
* Eval List:: Expressions whose values are displayed
each time you enter Edebug.
* Printing in Edebug:: Customization of printing.
* Trace Buffer:: How to produce trace output in a buffer.
* Coverage Testing:: How to test evaluation coverage.
* The Outside Context:: Data that Edebug saves and restores.
* Jumping:: Commands to jump to a specified place.
* Edebug Misc:: Miscellaneous commands.
* Breaks:: Setting breakpoints to make the program stop.
* Trapping Errors:: Trapping errors with Edebug.
* Edebug Views:: Views inside and outside of Edebug.
* Edebug Eval:: Evaluating expressions within Edebug.
* Eval List:: Expressions whose values are displayed
each time you enter Edebug.
* Printing in Edebug:: Customization of printing.
* Trace Buffer:: How to produce trace output in a buffer.
* Coverage Testing:: How to test evaluation coverage.
* The Outside Context:: Data that Edebug saves and restores.
* Edebug and Macros:: Specifying how to handle macro calls.
* Edebug Options:: Option variables for customizing Edebug.
* Edebug Options:: Option variables for customizing Edebug.
Breaks
......@@ -627,8 +627,8 @@ The Outside Context
Edebug and Macros
* Instrumenting Macro Calls::The basic problem.
* Specification List:: How to specify complex patterns of evaluation.
* Backtracking:: What Edebug does when matching fails.
* Specification List:: How to specify complex patterns of evaluation.
* Backtracking:: What Edebug does when matching fails.
* Specification Examples:: To help understand specifications.
Debugging Invalid Lisp Syntax
......@@ -653,13 +653,13 @@ Minibuffers
* Intro to Minibuffers:: Basic information about minibuffers.
* Text from Minibuffer:: How to read a straight text string.
* Object from Minibuffer:: How to read a Lisp object or expression.
* Minibuffer History:: Recording previous minibuffer inputs
so the user can reuse them.
* Minibuffer History:: Recording previous minibuffer inputs
so the user can reuse them.
* Initial Input:: Specifying initial contents for the minibuffer.
* Completion:: How to invoke and customize completion.
* Yes-or-No Queries:: Asking a question with a simple answer.
* Multiple Queries:: Asking a series of similar questions.
* Reading a Password:: Reading a password from the terminal.
* Multiple Queries:: Asking a series of similar questions.
* Reading a Password:: Reading a password from the terminal.
* Minibuffer Commands:: Commands used as key bindings in minibuffers.
* Minibuffer Contents:: How such commands access the minibuffer text.
* Minibuffer Windows:: Operating on the special minibuffer windows.
......@@ -687,7 +687,7 @@ Command Loop
* Distinguish Interactive:: Making a command distinguish interactive calls.
* Command Loop Info:: Variables set by the command loop for you to examine.
* Adjusting Point:: Adjustment of point after a command.
* Input Events:: What input looks like when you read it.
* Input Events:: What input looks like when you read it.
* Reading Input:: How to read input events from the keyboard or mouse.
* Special Events:: Events processed immediately and individually.
* Waiting:: Waiting for user input or elapsed time.
......@@ -721,7 +721,7 @@ Input Events
* Event Examples:: Examples of the lists for mouse events.
* Classifying Events:: Finding the modifier keys in an event symbol.
Event types.
* Accessing Mouse:: Functions to extract info from mouse events.
* Accessing Mouse:: Functions to extract info from mouse events.
* Accessing Scroll:: Functions to get info from scroll bar events.
* Strings of Events:: Special considerations for putting
keyboard character events in a string.
......@@ -871,9 +871,9 @@ Files
* Changing Files:: Renaming files, changing protection, etc.
* File Names:: Decomposing and expanding file names.
* Contents of Directories:: Getting a list of the files in a directory.
* Create/Delete Dirs:: Creating and Deleting Directories.
* Magic File Names:: Defining "magic" special handling
for certain file names.
* Create/Delete Dirs:: Creating and Deleting Directories.
* Magic File Names:: Defining "magic" special handling
for certain file names.
* Format Conversion:: Conversion to and from various file formats.
Visiting Files
......@@ -885,7 +885,7 @@ Information about Files
* Testing Accessibility:: Is a given file readable? Writable?
* Kinds of Files:: Is it a directory? A symbolic link?
* Truenames:: Eliminating symbolic links from a file name.
* Truenames:: Eliminating symbolic links from a file name.
* File Attributes:: How large is it? Any other names? Etc.
* Locating Files:: How to find a file in standard places.
......@@ -955,8 +955,8 @@ Windows
* Buffers and Windows:: Each window displays the contents of a buffer.
* Displaying Buffers:: Higher-level functions for displaying a buffer
and choosing a window for it.
* Choosing Window:: How to choose a window for displaying a buffer.
* Dedicated Windows:: How to avoid displaying another buffer in
* Choosing Window:: How to choose a window for displaying a buffer.
* Dedicated Windows:: How to avoid displaying another buffer in
a specific window.
* Window Point:: Each window has its own location of point.
* Window Start and End:: Buffer positions indicating which text is
......@@ -976,37 +976,37 @@ Windows
Frames
* Creating Frames:: Creating additional frames.
* Creating Frames:: Creating additional frames.
* Multiple Terminals:: Displaying on several different devices.
* Frame Parameters:: Controlling frame size, position, font, etc.
* Frame Parameters:: Controlling frame size, position, font, etc.
* Terminal Parameters:: Parameters common for all frames on terminal.
* Frame Titles:: Automatic updating of frame titles.
* Deleting Frames:: Frames last until explicitly deleted.
* Finding All Frames:: How to examine all existing frames.
* Frames and Windows:: A frame contains windows;
display of text always works through windows.
* Deleting Frames:: Frames last until explicitly deleted.
* Finding All Frames:: How to examine all existing frames.
* Frames and Windows:: A frame contains windows;
display of text always works through windows.
* Minibuffers and Frames:: How a frame finds the minibuffer to use.
* Input Focus:: Specifying the selected frame.
* Input Focus:: Specifying the selected frame.
* Visibility of Frames:: Frames may be visible or invisible, or icons.
* Raising and Lowering:: Raising a frame makes it hide other windows;
lowering it makes the others hide it.
lowering it makes the others hide it.
* Frame Configurations:: Saving the state of all frames.
* Mouse Tracking:: Getting events that say when the mouse moves.
* Mouse Position:: Asking where the mouse is, or moving it.
* Pop-Up Menus:: Displaying a menu for the user to select from.
* Mouse Tracking:: Getting events that say when the mouse moves.
* Mouse Position:: Asking where the mouse is, or moving it.
* Pop-Up Menus:: Displaying a menu for the user to select from.
* Dialog Boxes:: Displaying a box to ask yes or no.
* Pointer Shape:: Specifying the shape of the mouse pointer.
* Window System Selections::Transferring text to and from other X clients.
* Drag and Drop:: Internals of Drag-and-Drop implementation.
* Color Names:: Getting the definitions of color names.
* Color Names:: Getting the definitions of color names.
* Text Terminal Colors:: Defining colors for text-only terminals.
* Resources:: Getting resource values from the server.
* Resources:: Getting resource values from the server.
* Display Feature Testing:: Determining the features of a terminal.
Frame Parameters
* Parameter Access:: How to change a frame's parameters.
* Initial Parameters:: Specifying frame parameters when you make a frame.
* Initial Parameters:: Specifying frame parameters when you make a frame.
* Window Frame Parameters:: List of frame parameters for window systems.
* Size and Position:: Changing the size and position of a frame.
* Geometry:: Parsing geometry specifications.
......@@ -1065,7 +1065,7 @@ Text
later use.
* Undo:: Undoing changes to the text of a buffer.
* Maintaining Undo:: How to enable and disable undo information.
How to control how much information is kept.
How to control how much information is kept.
* Filling:: Functions for explicit filling.
* Margins:: How to specify margins for filling commands.
* Adaptive Fill:: Adaptive Fill mode chooses a fill prefix
......@@ -1091,7 +1091,7 @@ The Kill Ring
* Kill Functions:: Functions that kill text.
* Yanking:: How yanking is done.
* Yank Commands:: Commands that access the kill ring.
* Low-Level Kill Ring:: Functions and variables for kill ring access.
* Low-Level Kill Ring:: Functions and variables for kill ring access.
* Internals of Kill Ring:: Variables that hold kill ring data.
Indentation
......@@ -1106,9 +1106,9 @@ Indentation
Text Properties
* Examining Properties:: Looking at the properties of one character.
* Changing Properties:: Setting the properties of a range of text.
* Property Search:: Searching for where a property changes value.
* Special Properties:: Particular properties with special meanings.
* Changing Properties:: Setting the properties of a range of text.
* Property Search:: Searching for where a property changes value.
* Special Properties:: Particular properties with special meanings.
* Format Properties:: Properties for representing formatting of text.
* Sticky Properties:: How inserted text gets properties from
neighboring text.
......@@ -1118,8 +1118,8 @@ Text Properties
do something when you click on them.
* Fields:: The @code{field} property defines
fields within the buffer.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
Lisp-visible text intervals.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
Lisp-visible text intervals.
Non-@acronym{ASCII} Characters
......@@ -1162,7 +1162,7 @@ Searching and Matching
* POSIX Regexps:: Searching POSIX-style for the longest match.
* Match Data:: Finding out which part of the text matched,
after a string or regexp search.
* Search and Replace:: Commands that loop, searching and replacing.
* Search and Replace:: Commands that loop, searching and replacing.
* Standard Regexps:: Useful regexps for finding sentences, pages,...
Regular Expressions
......@@ -1179,9 +1179,9 @@ Syntax of Regular Expressions
The Match Data
* Replacing Match:: Replacing a substring that was matched.
* Replacing Match:: Replacing a substring that was matched.
* Simple Match Data:: Accessing single items of match data,
such as where a particular subexpression started.
such as where a particular subexpression started.
* Entire Match Data:: Accessing the entire match data at once, as a list.
* Saving Match Data:: Saving and restoring the match data.
......@@ -1191,7 +1191,7 @@ Syntax Tables
* Syntax Descriptors:: How characters are classified.
* Syntax Table Functions:: How to create, examine and alter syntax tables.
* Syntax Properties:: Overriding syntax with text properties.
* Motion and Syntax:: Moving over characters with certain syntaxes.
* Motion and Syntax:: Moving over characters with certain syntaxes.
* Parsing Expressions:: Parsing balanced expressions
using the syntax table.
* Standard Syntax Tables:: Syntax tables used by various major modes.
......@@ -1280,10 +1280,10 @@ Emacs Display
* Invisible Text:: Hiding part of the buffer text.
* Selective Display:: Hiding part of the buffer text (the old way).
* Temporary Displays:: Displays that go away automatically.
* Overlays:: Use overlays to highlight parts of the buffer.
* Overlays:: Use overlays to highlight parts of the buffer.
* Width:: How wide a character or string is on the screen.
* Line Height:: Controlling the height of lines.
* Faces:: A face defines a graphics style
* Faces:: A face defines a graphics style
for text characters: font, colors, etc.
* Fringes:: Controlling window fringes.
* Scroll Bars:: Controlling vertical scroll bars.
......@@ -1292,9 +1292,9 @@ Emacs Display
* Buttons:: Adding clickable buttons to Emacs buffers.
* Abstract Display:: Emacs' Widget for Object Collections.
* Blinking:: How Emacs shows the matching open parenthesis.
* Usual Display:: The usual conventions for displaying
* Usual Display:: The usual conventions for displaying
nonprinting chars.
* Display Tables:: How to specify other conventions.
* Display Tables:: How to specify other conventions.
* Beeping:: Audible signal to the user.
* Window Systems:: Which window system is being used.
......@@ -1316,7 +1316,7 @@ Overlays
* Managing Overlays:: Creating and moving overlays.
* Overlay Properties:: How to read and set properties.
What properties do to the screen display.
What properties do to the screen display.
* Finding Overlays:: Searching for overlays.
Faces
......@@ -1396,14 +1396,14 @@ Operating System Interface
* Getting Out:: How exiting works (permanent or temporary).
* System Environment:: Distinguish the name and kind of system.
* User Identification:: Finding the name and user id of the user.
* Time of Day:: Getting the current time.
* Time of Day:: Getting the current time.
* Time Conversion:: Converting a time from numeric form to
calendrical data and vice versa.
* Time Parsing:: Converting a time from numeric form to text
and vice versa.
* Processor Run Time:: Getting the run time used by Emacs.
* Time Calculations:: Adding, subtracting, comparing times, etc.
* Timers:: Setting a timer to call a function at a
* Timers:: Setting a timer to call a function at a
certain time.
* Idle Timers:: Setting a timer to call a function when Emacs has
been idle for a certain length of time.
......@@ -1430,8 +1430,8 @@ Getting Out of Emacs
Terminal Input
* Input Modes:: Options for how input is processed.
* Recording Input:: Saving histories of recent or all input events.
* Input Modes:: Options for how input is processed.
* Recording Input:: Saving histories of recent or all input events.
Tips and Conventions
......@@ -1441,7 +1441,7 @@ Tips and Conventions
* Compilation Tips:: Making compiled code run fast.
* Warning Tips:: Turning off compiler warnings.
* Documentation Tips:: Writing readable documentation strings.
* Comment Tips:: Conventions for writing comments.
* Comment Tips:: Conventions for writing comments.
* Library Headers:: Standard headers for library packages.
GNU Emacs Internals
......
......@@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
files are made.
* Buffers:: Creating and using buffer objects.
* Windows:: Manipulating windows and displaying buffers.
* Frames:: Making multiple system-level windows.
* Frames:: Making multiple system-level windows.
* Positions:: Buffer positions and motion functions.
* Markers:: Markers represent positions and update
automatically when the text is changed.
......@@ -175,7 +175,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
* Abbrevs:: How Abbrev mode works, and its data structures.
* Processes:: Running and communicating with subprocesses.
* Display:: Features for controlling the screen display.
* Display:: Features for controlling the screen display.
* System Interface:: Getting the user id, system type, environment
variables, and other such things.
......@@ -310,10 +310,10 @@ Editing Types
Numbers
* Integer Basics:: Representation and range of integers.
* Float Basics:: Representation and range of floating point.
* Float Basics:: Representation and range of floating point.
* Predicates on Numbers:: Testing for numbers.
* Comparison of Numbers:: Equality and inequality predicates.
* Numeric Conversions:: Converting float to integer and vice versa.
* Numeric Conversions:: Converting float to integer and vice versa.
* Arithmetic Operations:: How to add, subtract, multiply and divide.
* Rounding Operations:: Explicitly rounding floating point numbers.
* Bitwise Operations:: Logical and, or, not, shifting.
......@@ -330,7 +330,7 @@ Strings and Characters
* String Conversion:: Converting to and from characters and strings.
* Formatting Strings:: @code{format}: Emacs's analogue of @code{printf}.
* Case Conversion:: Case conversion functions.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
* Case Tables:: Customizing case conversion.
Lists
......@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ Kinds of Forms
* Symbol Forms:: Symbols evaluate as variables.
* Classifying Lists:: How to distinguish various sorts of list forms.
* Function Indirection:: When a symbol appears as the car of a list,
we find the real function via the symbol.
we find the real function via the symbol.
* Function Forms:: Forms that call functions.
* Macro Forms:: Forms that call macros.
* Special Forms:: "Special forms" are idiosyncratic primitives,
......@@ -479,9 +479,9 @@ Functions
* Function Cells:: Accessing or setting the function definition
of a symbol.
* Obsolete Functions:: Declaring functions obsolete.
* Inline Functions:: Defining functions that the compiler
* Inline Functions:: Defining functions that the compiler
will open code.
* Declaring Functions:: Telling the compiler that a function is defined.
* Declaring Functions:: Telling the compiler that a function is defined.
* Function Safety:: Determining whether a function is safe to call.
* Related Topics:: Cross-references to specific Lisp primitives
that have a special bearing on how
......@@ -541,9 +541,9 @@ Loading
* Repeated Loading:: Precautions about loading a file twice.
* Named Features:: Loading a library if it isn't already loaded.
* Where Defined:: Finding which file defined a certain symbol.
* Unloading:: How to "unload" a library that was loaded.
* Hooks for Loading:: Providing code to be run when
particular libraries are loaded.
* Unloading:: How to "unload" a library that was loaded.
* Hooks for Loading:: Providing code to be run when
particular libraries are loaded.
Byte Compilation
......@@ -553,7 +553,7 @@ Byte Compilation
* Dynamic Loading:: Dynamic loading of individual functions.
* Eval During Compile:: Code to be evaluated when you compile.
* Compiler Errors:: Handling compiler error messages.
* Byte-Code Objects:: The data type used for byte-compiled functions.
* Byte-Code Objects:: The data type used for byte-compiled functions.
* Disassembly:: Disassembling byte-code; how to read byte-code.
Advising Emacs Lisp Functions
......@@ -582,7 +582,7 @@ Debugging Lisp Programs
The Lisp Debugger
* Error Debugging:: Entering the debugger when an error happens.
* Infinite Loops:: Stopping and debugging a program that doesn't exit.
* Infinite Loops:: Stopping and debugging a program that doesn't exit.
* Function Debugging:: Entering it when a certain function is called.
* Explicit Debug:: Entering it at a certain point in the program.
* Using Debugger:: What the debugger does; what you see while in it.
......@@ -592,24 +592,24 @@ The Lisp Debugger
Edebug
* Using Edebug:: Introduction to use of Edebug.
* Instrumenting:: You must instrument your code
in order to debug it with Edebug.
* Using Edebug:: Introduction to use of Edebug.
* Instrumenting:: You must instrument your code
in order to debug it with Edebug.
* Edebug Execution Modes:: Execution modes, stopping more or less often.
* Jumping:: Commands to jump to a specified place.
* Edebug Misc:: Miscellaneous commands.
* Breaks:: Setting breakpoints to make the program stop.
* Trapping Errors:: Trapping errors with Edebug.
* Edebug Views:: Views inside and outside of Edebug.
* Edebug Eval:: Evaluating expressions within Edebug.
* Eval List:: Expressions whose values are displayed
each time you enter Edebug.
* Printing in Edebug:: Customization of printing.
* Trace Buffer:: How to produce trace output in a buffer.
* Coverage Testing:: How to test evaluation coverage.
* The Outside Context:: Data that Edebug saves and restores.
* Jumping:: Commands to jump to a specified place.
* Edebug Misc:: Miscellaneous commands.
* Breaks:: Setting breakpoints to make the program stop.
* Trapping Errors:: Trapping errors with Edebug.
* Edebug Views:: Views inside and outside of Edebug.
* Edebug Eval:: Evaluating expressions within Edebug.
* Eval List:: Expressions whose values are displayed
each time you enter Edebug.
* Printing in Edebug:: Customization of printing.
* Trace Buffer:: How to produce trace output in a buffer.
* Coverage Testing:: How to test evaluation coverage.
* The Outside Context:: Data that Edebug saves and restores.
* Edebug and Macros:: Specifying how to handle macro calls.
* Edebug Options:: Option variables for customizing Edebug.