Commit d29fbf47 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Use @file for buffers, per the Texinfo manual

* doc/misc/ada-mode.texi, doc/misc/auth.texi, doc/misc/calc.texi:
* doc/misc/ebrowse.texi, doc/misc/efaq.texi, doc/misc/emacs-gnutls.texi:
* doc/misc/epa.texi, doc/misc/ert.texi, doc/misc/eshell.texi:
* doc/misc/eww.texi, doc/misc/flymake.texi, doc/misc/gnus.texi:
* doc/misc/info.texi, doc/misc/message.texi, doc/misc/mh-e.texi: 
* doc/misc/newsticker.texi, doc/misc/pcl-cvs.texi, doc/misc/rcirc.texi:
* doc/misc/sem-user.texi, doc/misc/smtpmail.texi, doc/misc/url.texi:
* doc/misc/viper.texi, doc/misc/wisent.texi, doc/misc/woman.texi: 
Use @file for buffers, per the Texinfo manual.
parent 991f63c0
2014-03-12 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* ada-mode.texi, auth.texi, calc.texi, ebrowse.texi, efaq.texi:
* emacs-gnutls.texi, epa.texi, ert.texi, eshell.texi, eww.texi:
* flymake.texi, gnus.texi, info.texi, message.texi, mh-e.texi:
* newsticker.texi, pcl-cvs.texi, rcirc.texi, sem-user.texi:
* smtpmail.texi, url.texi, viper.texi, wisent.texi, woman.texi:
Use @file for buffers, per the Texinfo manual.
2014-03-12 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
* org.texi: Don't set txicodequoteundirected and txicodequotebacktick
......
......@@ -352,7 +352,7 @@ Invoke @samp{Ada | Project | Load}, and load a project file that specifies @code
The @code{Check file}, @code{Compile file}, and @code{Build} commands
all place compilation errors in a separate buffer named
@code{*compilation*}.
@file{*compilation*}.
Each line in this buffer will become active: you can simply click on
it with the middle button of the mouse, or move point to it and press
......@@ -374,8 +374,8 @@ An Emacs Ada mode project file specifies what directories hold sources
for your project, and allows you to customize the compilation commands
and other things on a per-project basis.
Note that Ada mode project files @samp{*.adp} are different than GNAT
compiler project files @samp{*.gpr}. However, Emacs Ada mode can use a
Note that Ada mode project files @file{*.adp} are different than GNAT
compiler project files @file{*.gpr}. However, Emacs Ada mode can use a
GNAT project file to specify the project directories. If no
other customization is needed, a GNAT project file can be used without
an Emacs Ada mode project file.
......@@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ Yes, this is missing the keyword @code{body}; another compiler error
example.
In buffer @file{hello.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Check file}. You should
get a @code{*compilation*} buffer containing something like (the
get a @file{*compilation*} buffer containing something like (the
directory paths will be different):
@smallexample
......@@ -815,7 +815,7 @@ Emacs has remembered the main file, in the project variable
@code{main}, and used it for the Build command.
Finally, again while in @file{hello_pkg.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Run}.
The @code{*run*} buffer displays @code{Hello from hello_pkg.adb}.
The @file{*run*} buffer displays @code{Hello from hello_pkg.adb}.
One final point. If you switch back to buffer @file{hello.adb}, and
invoke @samp{Ada | Run}, @file{hello_2.exe} will be run. That is
......@@ -876,7 +876,7 @@ In buffer @file{hello.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Project | Load...}, and
select @file{Example_2/hello.adp}.
Then, again in buffer @file{hello.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Set main and
Build}. You should get a @code{*compilation*} buffer containing
Build}. You should get a @file{*compilation*} buffer containing
something like (the directory paths will be different):
@example
......@@ -960,7 +960,7 @@ In buffer @file{hello_3.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Project | Load...}, and
select @file{Example_3/Other/other.adp}.
Then, again in @file{hello_3.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Set main and
Build}. You should get a @code{*compilation*} buffer containing
Build}. You should get a @file{*compilation*} buffer containing
something like (the directory paths will be different):
@example
......@@ -1043,7 +1043,7 @@ In buffer @file{hello_4.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Project | Load...}, and
select @file{Example_4/Gnat_Project/hello_4.gpr}.
Then, again in @file{hello_4.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Set main and
Build}. You should get a @code{*compilation*} buffer containing
Build}. You should get a @file{*compilation*} buffer containing
something like (the directory paths will be different):
@smallexample
......@@ -1110,7 +1110,7 @@ In buffer @file{hello_5.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Project | Load...}, and
select @file{Example_5/hello_5.adp}.
Then, again in @file{hello_5.adb}, invoke @samp{Ada | Set main and
Build}. You should get a @code{*compilation*} buffer containing
Build}. You should get a @file{*compilation*} buffer containing
something like (the directory paths will be different):
@smallexample
......
......@@ -127,7 +127,7 @@ later.
If you have problems with the search, set @code{auth-source-debug} to
@code{'trivia} and see what host, port, and user the library is
checking in the @samp{*Messages*} buffer. Ditto for any other
checking in the @file{*Messages*} buffer. Ditto for any other
problems, your first step is always to see what's being checked. The
second step, of course, is to write a blog entry about it and wait for
the answer in the comments.
......@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ The auth-source library lets you control logging output easily.
@defvar auth-source-debug
Set this variable to @code{'trivia} to see lots of output in
@samp{*Messages*}, or set it to a function that behaves like
@file{*Messages*}, or set it to a function that behaves like
@code{message} to do your own logging.
@end defvar
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -495,7 +495,7 @@ The same functionality is available from the menu opened with
@node Member Display
@section Displaying Members
@cindex @samp{*Members*} buffer
@cindex @file{*Members*} buffer
@cindex @samp{*Globals*}
@cindex freezing a member buffer
@cindex member lists, in tree buffers
......
......@@ -2410,12 +2410,12 @@ printed an error message? If so, compiling from within Emacs using the
@kbd{M-x compile} and @kbd{M-x recompile} commands is a much more
effective way of doing that. Emacs automatically intercepts the compile
error messages, inserts them into a special buffer called
@code{*compilation*}, and lets you visit the locus of each message in
@file{*compilation*}, and lets you visit the locus of each message in
the source. Type @kbd{C-x `} to step through the offending lines one by
one (starting with Emacs 22, you can also use @kbd{M-g M-p} and
@kbd{M-g M-n} to go to the previous and next matches directly). Click
@kbd{Mouse-2} or press @key{RET} on a message text in the
@code{*compilation*} buffer to go to the line whose number is mentioned
@file{*compilation*} buffer to go to the line whose number is mentioned
in that message.
But if you indeed need to go to a certain text line, type @kbd{M-g M-g}
......
......@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ properly. Well, there's something to be done in the last case.
@defvar gnutls-log-level
The @code{gnutls-log-level} variable sets the log level. 1 is
verbose. 2 is very verbose. 5 is crazy. Crazy! Set it to 1 or 2
and look in the @code{*Messages*} buffer for the debugging
and look in the @file{*Messages*} buffer for the debugging
information.
@end defvar
......@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ instead.
Because of the low-level interactions with the GnuTLS library, there
is no way currently to ask if a certificate can be accepted. You have
to look in the @code{*Messages*} buffer.
to look in the @file{*Messages*} buffer.
@end defvar
@defvar gnutls-min-prime-bits
......
......@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ EasyPG Assistant commands are prefixed by @samp{epa-}. For example,
EasyPG Assistant provides several cryptographic features which can be
integrated into other Emacs functionalities. For example, automatic
encryption/decryption of @samp{*.gpg} files.
encryption/decryption of @file{*.gpg} files.
@node Commands
@chapter Commands
......@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ Show all keys matched with @var{name} from the private keyring.
@end deffn
@noindent
In @samp{*Keys*} buffer, several commands are available. The common
In @file{*Keys*} buffer, several commands are available. The common
use case is to export some keys to a file. To do that, type @kbd{m}
to select keys, type @kbd{o}, and then supply the filename.
......@@ -355,10 +355,10 @@ use that option to ignore specific recipients for encryption purposes.
@node Encrypting/decrypting gpg files
@section Encrypting/decrypting gpg files
By default, every file whose name ends with @samp{.gpg} will be
By default, every file whose name ends with @file{.gpg} will be
treated as encrypted. That is, when you open such a file, the
decrypted text is inserted in the buffer rather than encrypted one.
Similarly, when you save the buffer to a @samp{foo.gpg} file,
Similarly, when you save the buffer to a @file{foo.gpg} file,
encrypted data is written.
The file name pattern for encrypted files can be controlled by
......@@ -492,7 +492,7 @@ collect necessary information to fix the bug, such as:
Before reporting the bug, you should set @code{epg-debug} in the
@file{~/.emacs} file and repeat the bug. Then, include the contents
of the @samp{ *epg-debug*} buffer. Note that the first letter of the
of the @file{ *epg-debug*} buffer. Note that the first letter of the
buffer name is a whitespace.
@node GNU Free Documentation License
......
......@@ -513,7 +513,7 @@ occurs even if the test fails.
An exception to this are messages that the code under test prints with
@code{message} and similar logging; tests should not bother restoring
the @code{*Message*} buffer to its original state.
the @file{*Message*} buffer to its original state.
The above guidelines imply that tests should avoid calling highly
customizable commands such as @code{find-file}, except, of course, if
......
......@@ -665,7 +665,7 @@ virtual devices.
The buffer redirection operator, @code{>>>}, expects a buffer object
on the right-hand side, into which it inserts the output of the
left-hand side. e.g., @samp{echo hello >>> #<buffer *scratch*>}
inserts the string @code{"hello"} into the @code{*scratch*} buffer.
inserts the string @code{"hello"} into the @file{*scratch*} buffer.
@code{eshell-virtual-targets} is a list of mappings of virtual device
names to functions. Eshell comes with two virtual devices:
......
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ either prefix the file name with @code{file://} or use the command
@kindex q
@kindex w
@kindex g
If loading the URL was successful the buffer @code{*eww*} is opened
If loading the URL was successful the buffer @file{*eww*} is opened
and the web page is rendered in it. You can leave EWW by pressing
@kbd{q} or exit the browser by calling @kbd{eww-quit}. To reload the
web page hit @kbd{g} (@code{eww-reload}). Pressing @kbd{w}
......@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ forth between them. By pressing @kbd{l} (@code{eww-back-url}) you go
to the previous URL. You can go forward again with @kbd{r}
(@code{eww-forward-url}). If you want an overview of your browsing
history press @kbd{H} (@code{eww-list-histories}) to open the history
buffer @code{*eww history*}. The history is lost when EWW is quit.
buffer @file{*eww history*}. The history is lost when EWW is quit.
If you want to remember websites you can use bookmarks.
@findex eww-add-bookmark
......@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ If you want to remember websites you can use bookmarks.
(@code{eww-add-bookmark}) to store a bookmark for the current website.
You can view stored bookmarks with @kbd{B}
(@code{eww-list-bookmarks}). This will open the bookmark buffer
@code{*eww bookmarks*}.
@file{*eww bookmarks*}.
@findex eww-browse-with-external-browser
@vindex shr-external-browser
......@@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ browser by customizing
@cindex Viewing Source
You can view the source of a website with @kbd{v}
(@code{eww-view-source}). This will open a new buffer
@code{*eww-source*} and insert the source. The buffer will be set to
@file{*eww-source*} and insert the source. The buffer will be set to
@code{html-mode} if available.
@findex url-cookie-list
......
......@@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ syntax check tool).
Flymake uses a simple logging facility for indicating important points
in the control flow. The logging facility sends logging messages to
the @code{*Messages*} buffer. The information logged can be used for
the @file{*Messages*} buffer. The information logged can be used for
resolving various problems related to Flymake.
Logging output is controlled by the @code{flymake-log-level}
......@@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ started after @code{flymake-no-changes-timeout} seconds.
@item flymake-gui-warnings-enabled
A boolean flag indicating whether Flymake will show message boxes for
non-recoverable errors. If @code{flymake-gui-warnings-enabled} is
@code{nil}, these errors will only be logged to the @code{*Messages*}
@code{nil}, these errors will only be logged to the @file{*Messages*}
buffer.
@item flymake-start-syntax-check-on-newline
......
......@@ -998,7 +998,7 @@ terminology section (@pxref{Terminology}).
@cindex finding news
First of all, you should know that there is a special buffer called
@code{*Server*} that lists all the servers Gnus knows about. You can
@file{*Server*} that lists all the servers Gnus knows about. You can
press @kbd{^} from the Group buffer to see it. In the Server buffer,
you can press @kbd{RET} on a defined server to see all the groups it
serves (subscribed or not!). You can also add or delete servers, edit
......@@ -5888,7 +5888,7 @@ have posted almost the same article twice.
If you have just posted the article, and change your mind right away,
there is a trick you can use to cancel/supersede the article without
waiting for the article to appear on your site first. You simply return
to the post buffer (which is called @code{*sent ...*}). There you will
to the post buffer (which is called @file{*sent ...*}). There you will
find the article you just posted, with all the headers intact. Change
the @code{Message-ID} header to a @code{Cancel} or @code{Supersedes}
header by substituting one of those words for the word
......@@ -11139,7 +11139,7 @@ If you're in the habit of exiting groups, and then changing your mind
about it, you might set @code{gnus-kill-summary-on-exit} to @code{nil}.
If you do that, Gnus won't kill the summary buffer when you exit it.
(Quelle surprise!) Instead it will change the name of the buffer to
something like @samp{*Dead Summary ... *} and install a minor mode
something like @file{*Dead Summary ... *} and install a minor mode
called @code{gnus-dead-summary-mode}. Now, if you switch back to this
buffer, you'll find that all keys are mapped to a function called
@code{gnus-summary-wake-up-the-dead}. So tapping any keys in a dead
......@@ -13732,7 +13732,7 @@ A hook run before attempting to connect to an @acronym{NNTP} server.
@item nntp-record-commands
@vindex nntp-record-commands
If non-@code{nil}, @code{nntp} will log all commands it sends to the
@acronym{NNTP} server (along with a timestamp) in the @samp{*nntp-log*}
@acronym{NNTP} server (along with a timestamp) in the @file{*nntp-log*}
buffer. This is useful if you are debugging a Gnus/@acronym{NNTP} connection
that doesn't seem to work.
......@@ -19438,7 +19438,7 @@ Display the score of the current article
@kindex V t (Summary)
@findex gnus-score-find-trace
Display all score rules that have been used on the current article
(@code{gnus-score-find-trace}). In the @code{*Score Trace*} buffer, you
(@code{gnus-score-find-trace}). In the @file{*Score Trace*} buffer, you
may type @kbd{e} to edit score file corresponding to the score rule on
current line and @kbd{f} to format (@code{gnus-score-pretty-print}) the
score file and edit it.
......@@ -25919,7 +25919,7 @@ Fortunately, setting up the Gnus registry is pretty easy:
@end lisp
This adds registry saves to Gnus newsrc saves (which happen on exit
and when you press @kbd{s} from the @code{*Group*} buffer. It also
and when you press @kbd{s} from the @file{*Group*} buffer. It also
adds registry calls to article actions in Gnus (copy, move, etc.)@: so
it's not easy to undo the initialization. See
@code{gnus-registry-initialize} for the gory details.
......@@ -26204,8 +26204,8 @@ This variable controls whether to add timestamps to messages that are
controlled by @code{gnus-verbose} and @code{gnus-verbose-backends} and
are issued. The default value is @code{nil} which means never to add
timestamp. If it is @code{log}, add timestamps to only the messages
that go into the @samp{*Messages*} buffer (in XEmacs, it is the
@w{@samp{ *Message-Log*}} buffer). If it is neither @code{nil} nor
that go into the @file{*Messages*} buffer (in XEmacs, it is the
@w{@file{ *Message-Log*}} buffer). If it is neither @code{nil} nor
@code{log}, add timestamps not only to log messages but also to the ones
displayed in the echo area.
......@@ -1145,7 +1145,7 @@ select in another window.
Another way to produce new Info buffers in Emacs is to use a numeric
prefix argument for the @kbd{C-h i} command (@code{info}) which
switches to the Info buffer with that number. Thus, @kbd{C-u 2 C-h i}
switches to the buffer @samp{*info*<2>}, creating it if necessary.
switches to the buffer @file{*info*<2>}, creating it if necessary.
@findex info-display-manual
If you have created many Info buffers in Emacs, you might find it
......
......@@ -1451,7 +1451,7 @@ Look like @code{angles} if that doesn't require quoting, and
Headers in this list that were previously generated by Message will be
deleted before posting. Let's say you post an article. Then you decide
to post it again to some other group, you naughty boy, so you jump back
to the @code{*post-buf*} buffer, edit the @code{Newsgroups} line, and
to the @file{*post-buf*} buffer, edit the @code{Newsgroups} line, and
ship it off again. By default, this variable makes sure that the old
generated @code{Message-ID} is deleted, and a new one generated. If
this isn't done, the entire empire would probably crumble, anarchy would
......
......@@ -1086,7 +1086,7 @@ on a desert island with a laptop and are without your manuals, you can
get a summary of all these commands with GNU Emacs online help: use
@kbd{C-h m} (@code{describe-mode}) for a brief summary of commands,
@kbd{?} (@code{mh-help}) for an even briefer summary@footnote{This
help appears in a buffer called @samp{*MH-E Help*}
help appears in a buffer called @file{*MH-E Help*}
(@pxref{Miscellaneous}).} (@kbd{C-c ?} in MH-Letter mode), or @kbd{C-h
i} to read this manual via Info. The online help is quite good; try
running @kbd{C-h C-h}. This brings up a list of available help topics,
......@@ -3692,8 +3692,8 @@ Set the options @code{mh-new-messages-folders} and
folders. Otherwise, list the folders that should be searched with the
@samp{Choose Folders} menu item. See @code{mh-recursive-folders-flag}.
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Folders*}
@findex mh-kill-folder
@findex mh-list-folders
@findex mh-pack-folder
......@@ -3707,7 +3707,7 @@ folders. Otherwise, list the folders that should be searched with the
Other commands you can perform on folders include: @kbd{F l}
(@code{mh-list-folders}), to place a listing of all the folders in
your mail directory in a buffer called @samp{*MH-E Folders*}
your mail directory in a buffer called @file{*MH-E Folders*}
(@pxref{Miscellaneous}); @kbd{F k} (@code{mh-kill-folder}), to remove
a folder; @kbd{F S} (@code{mh-sort-folder}), to sort the messages by
date (see @command{sortm}(1) to see how to sort by other criteria);
......@@ -3781,7 +3781,7 @@ When you want to quit using MH-E and go back to editing, you can use
the @kbd{q} (@code{mh-quit}) command. This buries the buffers of the
current MH-E folder and restores the buffers that were present when
you first ran @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}. It also removes any MH-E working
buffers whose name begins with @samp{ *mh-} or @samp{*MH-E }
buffers whose name begins with @samp{ *mh-} or @file{*MH-E }
(@pxref{Miscellaneous}). You can later restore your MH-E session by
selecting the @samp{+inbox} buffer or by running @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}
again.
......@@ -5618,10 +5618,10 @@ field, this setting is vital so that you can read the mail you write!
@node Checking Recipients, Sending Message, Sending PGP, Editing Drafts
@section Checking Recipients
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex @command{whom}
@cindex MH commands, @command{whom}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex checking recipients
@cindex recipients, checking
@findex mh-check-whom
......@@ -5629,7 +5629,7 @@ field, this setting is vital so that you can read the mail you write!
The command @kbd{C-c C-w} (@code{mh-check-whom}) expands aliases so
you can check the actual address(es) in the alias. A new buffer named
@samp{*MH-E Recipients*} is created with the output of @command{whom}
@file{*MH-E Recipients*} is created with the output of @command{whom}
(@pxref{Miscellaneous})@footnote{See the section
@uref{@value{MH-BOOK-HOME}/senove.html#WhaPro, What now?---and the
whatnow Program} in the MH book.}.
......@@ -5637,8 +5637,8 @@ whatnow Program} in the MH book.}.
@node Sending Message, Killing Draft, Checking Recipients, Editing Drafts
@section Sending a Message
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex sending mail
@findex mh-send-letter
@kindex C-c C-c
......@@ -5646,7 +5646,7 @@ whatnow Program} in the MH book.}.
When you are all through editing a message, you send it with the
command @kbd{C-c C-c} (@code{mh-send-letter}). You can give a prefix
argument (as in @kbd{C-u C-c C-c}) to monitor the first stage of the
delivery; this output can be found in a buffer called @samp{*MH-E Mail
delivery; this output can be found in a buffer called @file{*MH-E Mail
Delivery*} (@pxref{Miscellaneous}).
@cindex sending mail
......@@ -7157,7 +7157,7 @@ MH-E has been byte-compiled, you could try running @samp{locate
mh-thread.elc} or otherwise find MH-E on your system and ensure that
@file{mh-thread.elc} exists. If you have multiple versions and you
find that one is compiled but the other is not, then go into your
@samp{*scratch*} buffer in Emacs, enter @kbd{load-path C-j}, and
@file{*scratch*} buffer in Emacs, enter @kbd{load-path C-j}, and
ensure that the byte-compiled version appears first in the
@code{load-path}. If you find that MH-E is not compiled and you
installed MH-E yourself, please refer to the installation directions
......@@ -7443,8 +7443,8 @@ sequence, use @kbd{S '} (@code{mh-narrow-to-tick}). When you want to
widen the view to all your messages again, use @kbd{S w}
(@code{mh-widen}).
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Sequences*}
@findex mh-list-sequences
@findex mh-msg-is-in-seq
@kindex S l
......@@ -7456,7 +7456,7 @@ display the sequences in which another message appears (as in @kbd{C-u
42 S s @key{RET}}). Or, you can list all sequences in a selected
folder (default is current folder) with @kbd{S l}
(@code{mh-list-sequences}). The list appears in a buffer named
@samp{*MH-E Sequences*} (@pxref{Miscellaneous}).
@file{*MH-E Sequences*} (@pxref{Miscellaneous}).
@cindex MH profile component, @samp{Previous-Sequence}
@cindex @samp{cur} sequence
......@@ -7676,8 +7676,8 @@ If a message is in any sequence (except @samp{Previous-Sequence:} and
sequences in the destination folder. If this behavior is not desired,
then turn off the option @code{mh-whitelist-preserves-sequences-flag}.
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Log*}
@findex call-process
@vindex mh-junk-background
......@@ -7688,7 +7688,7 @@ turning on the option @code{mh-junk-background}. @footnote{Note that
the option @code{mh-junk-background} is used as the @code{display}
argument in the call to @code{call-process}. Therefore, turning on
this option means setting its value to @samp{0}. You can also set its
value to @samp{t} to direct the programs' output to the @samp{*MH-E
value to @samp{t} to direct the programs' output to the @file{*MH-E
Log*} buffer; this may be useful for debugging.}
The following sections discuss the various counter-spam measures that
......@@ -7976,16 +7976,16 @@ Display version information about MH-E and the MH mail handling
system.
@end ftable
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex MH-E version
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex version
@kindex M-x mh-version
One command worth noting is @kbd{M-x mh-version}. You can compare the
version this command prints to the latest release (@pxref{Getting
MH-E}). The output of @kbd{M-x mh-version}, found in a buffer named
@samp{*MH-E Info*}, should usually be included with any bug report you
@file{*MH-E Info*}, should usually be included with any bug report you
submit (@pxref{Bug Reports}).
@subheading MH-E Buffers
......@@ -7994,16 +7994,16 @@ Besides the MH-Folder, MH-Show, and MH-Letter buffers, MH-E creates
several other buffers. They are:
@table @samp
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Folders*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Folders*}
@findex mh-list-folders
@item *MH-E Folders*
@kindex F l
This buffer contains the output of @kbd{F l} (@code{mh-list-folders}).
@xref{Folders}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Help*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Help*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Help*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Help*}
@findex mh-help
@item *MH-E Help*
@kindex ?
......@@ -8011,25 +8011,25 @@ This buffer contains the output of @kbd{F l} (@code{mh-list-folders}).
This buffer contains the output of @kbd{?} (@code{mh-help}) and
@kbd{C-c ?} in MH-Letter mode. @xref{Using This Manual}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Info*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Info*}
@item *MH-E Info*
This buffer contains the output of @kbd{M-x mh-version @key{RET}}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Log*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Log*}
@item *MH-E Log*
This buffer contains the last 100 lines of the output of the various
MH commands.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Mail Delivery*}
@item *MH-E Mail Delivery*
This buffer contains the transcript of a mail delivery. @xref{Sending
Message}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Recipients*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Recipients*}
@findex mh-check-whom
@item *MH-E Recipients*
@kindex C-c C-w
......@@ -8037,14 +8037,14 @@ This buffer contains the output of @kbd{C-c C-w}
(@code{mh-check-whom}) and is killed when draft is sent.
@xref{Checking Recipients}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex @file{*MH-E Sequences*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*MH-E Sequences*}
@item *MH-E Sequences*
This buffer contains the output of @kbd{S l}
(@code{mh-list-sequences}). @xref{Sequences}.
@c -------------------------
@cindex @samp{*mh-temp*}
@cindex buffers, @samp{*mh-temp*}
@cindex @file{*mh-temp*}
@cindex buffers, @file{*mh-temp*}
@item *mh-temp*
This is a scratch, ephemeral, buffer used by MH-E functions. Note that
it is hidden because the first character in the name is a space.
......
......@@ -166,8 +166,8 @@ feeds (in tree form), a list of headlines for the current feed, and
the content of the current headline. Feeds can be placed into groups,
which themselves can be placed in groups and so on.
@item Newsticker's @emph{plainview} displays all headlines in a
single buffer, called @samp{*newsticker*}. The modeline in the
@samp{*newsticker*} buffer informs you whenever new headlines have
single buffer, called @file{*newsticker*}. The modeline in the
@file{*newsticker*} buffer informs you whenever new headlines have
arrived.
@end itemize
In both views clicking mouse-button 2 or pressing @key{RET} on a
......
......@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ Commands
* Removing handled entries:: Uninteresting lines can easily be removed.
* Ignoring files:: Telling CVS to ignore generated files.
* Viewing differences:: Commands to @samp{diff} different versions.
* Invoking Ediff:: Running @samp{ediff} from @samp{*cvs*} buffer.
* Invoking Ediff:: Running @samp{ediff} from @file{*cvs*} buffer.
* Updating files:: Updating files that Need-update.
* Tagging files:: Tagging files.
* Miscellaneous commands:: Miscellaneous commands.
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ The function @code{cvs-examine} will ask for a directory. The command
@samp{cvs -n update} will be run in that directory. (It should contain
files that have been checked out from a CVS archive.) The output from
@code{cvs} will be parsed and presented in a table in a buffer called
@samp{*cvs*}. It might look something like this:
@file{*cvs*}. It might look something like this:
@example
Repository : /usr/CVSroot
......@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ You can move the cursor up and down in the buffer with @kbd{C-n} and
repository. @xref{Committing changes}. You can also press @kbd{O} to
update any of the files that are marked @samp{Need-Update}. You can
also run @kbd{M-x cvs-update @key{RET}} (bound to @kbd{M-u} in the
@samp{*cvs*} buffer) to update all the files.
@file{*cvs*} buffer) to update all the files.
You can then press @kbd{=} to easily get a @samp{diff} between your
modified file and the base version that you started from, or you can
......@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ about files}).
@node Buffer contents
@chapter Buffer contents
@cindex Buffer contents
@cindex @code{*cvs*} buffer contents
@cindex @file{*cvs*} buffer contents
The display contains several columns, some of which are optional.
These columns are, from left to right:
......@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ marks are not ignored) or whichever file or directory the cursor is on.
If a directory is selected but the command cannot be applied to a
directory, then it will be applied to the set of files under this
directory which are in the @samp{*cvs*} buffer.
directory which are in the @file{*cvs*} buffer.
@findex cvs-mode-force-command
@findex cvs-allow-dir-commit
......@@ -504,7 +504,7 @@ you can use in PCL-CVS@. They are grouped together by type.
* Removing handled entries:: Uninteresting lines can easily be removed.
* Ignoring files:: Telling CVS to ignore generated files.
* Viewing differences:: Commands to @samp{diff} different versions.
* Invoking Ediff:: Running @samp{ediff} from @samp{*cvs*} buffer.
* Invoking Ediff:: Running @samp{ediff} from @file{*cvs*} buffer.
* Updating files:: Updating files that Need-update.
* Tagging files:: Tagging files.
* Miscellaneous commands:: Miscellaneous commands.
......@@ -520,10 +520,10 @@ you can use in PCL-CVS@. They are grouped together by type.
@findex cvs-quickdir
@cindex Creating the *cvs* buffer
Most commands in PCL-CVS require that you have a @samp{*cvs*}
Most commands in PCL-CVS require that you have a @file{*cvs*}
buffer. The commands that you use to get one are listed below.
For each, a @samp{cvs} process will be run, the output will be parsed by
PCL-CVS, and the result will be printed in the @samp{*cvs*} buffer (see
PCL-CVS, and the result will be printed in the @file{*cvs*} buffer (see
@ref{Buffer contents}, for a description of the buffer's contents).
@table @kbd
......@@ -547,7 +547,7 @@ in which the @samp{cvs update} will be run and the module to be checked
out.
@item M-x cvs-quickdir
Populate the @samp{*cvs*} buffer by just looking at the @file{CVS/Entries}
Populate the @file{*cvs*} buffer by just looking at the @file{CVS/Entries}
files. This is very much like @code{cvs-examine} except that it does
not access the CVS repository, which is a major advantage when the
repository is far away. But of course, it will not be able to detect
......@@ -628,7 +628,7 @@ to the ones PCL-CVS thinks are relevant.
@end table
@node Updating the buffer
@section Updating the @samp{*cvs*} buffer
@section Updating the @file{*cvs*} buffer
@findex cvs-update
@findex cvs-examine