Commit d373647e authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

; * doc/emacs/mini.texi (Yes or No Prompts): Fix last change.

parent 1ca6d156
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......@@ -813,35 +813,23 @@ varieties.
@cindex y or n prompt
For the first type of yes-or-no query, the prompt ends with
@samp{(y or n)}. Such a query does actually use the minibuffer;
the prompt appears in the minibuffer, and you answer by typing either
@samp{y} or @samp{n}, which immediately delivers the response. For
example, if you type @kbd{C-x C-w} (@kbd{write-file}) to save a
buffer, and enter the name of an existing file, Emacs issues a prompt
like this:
@w{@samp{(y or n)}}. You answer the query by typing a single key,
either @samp{y} or @samp{n}, which immediately exits the minibuffer
and delivers the response. For example, if you type @kbd{C-x C-w}
(@kbd{write-file}) to save a buffer, and enter the name of an existing
file, Emacs issues a prompt like this:
@smallexample
File ‘foo.el’ exists; overwrite? (y or n)
@end smallexample
@noindent
This query does actually use the minibuffer, so the usual
minibuffer editing commands can be used. You can perform
window scrolling operations while the query is active: @kbd{C-l}
recenters the selected window; @kbd{C-v} (or @key{PageDown}, or
@key{next}) scrolls forward; @kbd{M-v} (or @key{PageUp}, or
@key{prior}) scrolls backward; @kbd{C-M-v} scrolls forward in the next
window; and @kbd{C-M-S-v} scrolls backward in the next window. Typing
@kbd{C-g} dismisses the query, and quits the command that issued it
(@pxref{Quitting}).
@cindex yes or no prompt
The second type of yes-or-no query is typically employed if
giving the wrong answer would have serious consequences; it uses the
minibuffer, and features a prompt ending with @samp{(yes or no)}. For
example, if you invoke @kbd{C-x k} (@code{kill-buffer}) on a
file-visiting buffer with unsaved changes, Emacs activates the
minibuffer with a prompt like this:
The second type of yes-or-no query is typically employed if giving
the wrong answer would have serious consequences; it thus features a
longer prompt ending with @samp{(yes or no)}. For example, if you
invoke @kbd{C-x k} (@code{kill-buffer}) on a file-visiting buffer with
unsaved changes, Emacs activates the minibuffer with a prompt like
this:
@smallexample
Buffer foo.el modified; kill anyway? (yes or no)
......@@ -849,7 +837,12 @@ Buffer foo.el modified; kill anyway? (yes or no)
@noindent
To answer, you must type @samp{yes} or @samp{no} into the minibuffer,
followed by @key{RET}. The minibuffer behaves as described in the
previous sections; you can switch to another window with @kbd{C-x o},
use the history commands @kbd{M-p} and @kbd{M-n}, etc. Type @kbd{C-g}
to quit the minibuffer and the querying command.
followed by @key{RET}.
With both types of yes-or-no query the minibuffer behaves as described
in the previous sections; you can recenter the selected window with
@kbd{C-l}, scroll that window (@kbd{C-v} or @kbd{PageDown} scrolls
forward, @kbd{M-v} or @kbd{PageUp} scrolls backward), switch to
another window with @kbd{C-x o}, use the history commands @kbd{M-p}
and @kbd{M-n}, etc. Type @kbd{C-g} to dismiss the query, and quit the
minibuffer and the querying command (@pxref{Quitting}).
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