Commit d436e484 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Merge from origin/emacs-27

d6a0b66a (origin/emacs-27) * lisp/subr.el (save-match-data): Clarif...
1a6d59ee Improve the documentation of setting up fontsets
c7737d40 ; * etc/TODO (Ligatures): Update the entry based on recent...
fb2e34cd ; * etc/TODO (Ligatures): Update the entry based on recent...
13b6dfd4 * doc/emacs/killing.texi (Rectangles): Improve indexing.
a10254dd Fix accessing files on networked drives on MS-Windows
parents 294495de d6a0b66a
Pipeline #5655 passed with stage
in 57 minutes and 59 seconds
......@@ -727,6 +727,8 @@ them. Rectangle commands are useful with text in multicolumn formats,
and for changing text into or out of such formats.
@cindex mark rectangle
@cindex region-rectangle
@cindex rectangular region
To specify a rectangle for a command to work on, set the mark at one
corner and point at the opposite corner. The rectangle thus specified
is called the @dfn{region-rectangle}. If point and the mark are in
......
......@@ -1326,16 +1326,17 @@ stored in the system and the available font names are defined by the
system, fontsets are defined within Emacs itself. Once you have
defined a fontset, you can use it within Emacs by specifying its name,
anywhere that you could use a single font. Of course, Emacs fontsets
can use only the fonts that the system supports. If some characters
can use only the fonts that your system supports. If some characters
appear on the screen as empty boxes or hex codes, this means that the
fontset in use for them has no font for those characters. In this
case, or if the characters are shown, but not as well as you would
like, you may need to install extra fonts. Your operating system may
have optional fonts that you can install; or you can install the GNU
Intlfonts package, which includes fonts for most supported
scripts.@footnote{If you run Emacs on X, you may need to inform the X
server about the location of the newly installed fonts with commands
such as:
like, you may need to install extra fonts or modify the fontset to use
specific fonts already installed on your system (see below). Your
operating system may have optional fonts that you can install; or you
can install the GNU Intlfonts package, which includes fonts for most
supported scripts.@footnote{If you run Emacs on X, you may need to
inform the X server about the location of the newly installed fonts
with commands such as:
@c FIXME? I feel like this may be out of date.
@c E.g., the intlfonts tarfile is ~ 10 years old.
......@@ -1376,14 +1377,20 @@ explicitly requested, despite its name.
@w{@kbd{M-x describe-fontset}} command. It prompts for a fontset
name, defaulting to the one used by the current frame, and then
displays all the subranges of characters and the fonts assigned to
them in that fontset.
them in that fontset. To see which fonts Emacs is using in a session
started without a specific fontset (which is what happens normally),
type @kbd{fontset-default @key{RET}} at the prompt, or just
@kbd{@key{RET}} to describe the fontset used by the current frame.
A fontset does not necessarily specify a font for every character
code. If a fontset specifies no font for a certain character, or if
it specifies a font that does not exist on your system, then it cannot
display that character properly. It will display that character as a
hex code or thin space or an empty box instead. (@xref{Text Display, ,
glyphless characters}, for details.)
hex code or thin space or an empty box instead. (@xref{Text Display,
, glyphless characters}, for details.) Or a fontset might specify a
font for some range of characters, but you may not like their visual
appearance. If this happens, you may wish to modify your fontset; see
@ref{Modifying Fontsets}, for how to do that.
@node Defining Fontsets
@section Defining Fontsets
......@@ -1542,10 +1549,10 @@ call this function explicitly to create a fontset.
Fontsets do not always have to be created from scratch. If only
minor changes are required it may be easier to modify an existing
fontset. Modifying @samp{fontset-default} will also affect other
fontsets that use it as a fallback, so can be an effective way of
fixing problems with the fonts that Emacs chooses for a particular
script.
fontset, usually @samp{fontset-default}. Modifying
@samp{fontset-default} will also affect other fontsets that use it as
a fallback, so can be an effective way of fixing problems with the
fonts that Emacs chooses for a particular script.
Fontsets can be modified using the function @code{set-fontset-font},
specifying a character, a charset, a script, or a range of characters
......@@ -1553,26 +1560,61 @@ to modify the font for, and a font specification for the font to be
used. Some examples are:
@example
;; Use Liberation Mono for latin-3 charset.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default" 'iso-8859-3
"Liberation Mono")
;; Prefer a big5 font for han characters.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default"
'han (font-spec :registry "big5")
nil 'prepend)
;; Use MyPrivateFont for the Unicode private use area.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default" '(#xe000 . #xf8ff)
"MyPrivateFont")
;; Use Liberation Mono for latin-3 charset.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default" 'iso-8859-3
"Liberation Mono")
;; Use DejaVu Sans Mono as a fallback in fontset-startup
;; before resorting to fontset-default.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-startup" nil "DejaVu Sans Mono"
nil 'append)
@end example
;; Use MyPrivateFont for the Unicode private use area.
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default" '(#xe000 . #xf8ff)
"MyPrivateFont")
@noindent
@xref{Fontsets, , , elisp, GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}, for more
details about using the @code{set-fontset-font} function.
@cindex script of a character
@cindex codepoint of a character
If you don't know the character's codepoint or the script to which it
belongs, you can ask Emacs. With point at the character, type
@w{@kbd{C-u C-x =}} (@code{what-cursor-position}), and this
information, together with much more, will be displayed in the
@file{*Help*} buffer that Emacs pops up. @xref{Position Info}. For
example, Japanese characters belong to the @samp{kana} script, but
Japanese text also mixes them with Chinese characters so the following
uses the @samp{han} script to set up Emacs to use the @samp{Kochi
Gothic} font for Japanese text:
@example
(set-fontset-font "fontset-default" 'han "Kochi Gothic")
@end example
@noindent
@cindex CKJ characters
(For convenience, the @samp{han} script in Emacs is set up to support
all of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, a.k.a.@: @acronym{CJK},
characters, not just Chinese characters.)
@vindex script-representative-chars
For the list of known scripts, see the variable
@code{script-representative-chars}.
Fontset settings like those above only affect characters that the
default font doesn't support, so if the @samp{Kochi Gothic} font
covers Latin characters, it will not be used for displaying Latin
scripts, since the default font used by Emacs usually covers Basic
Latin.
@cindex ignore font
@cindex fonts, how to ignore
@vindex face-ignored-fonts
......
......@@ -3597,9 +3597,9 @@ characters in the range @var{from} and @var{to} (inclusive).
@var{character} may be a charset (@pxref{Character Sets}). In that
case, use @var{font-spec} for all the characters in the charset.
@var{character} may be a script name (@pxref{Character Properties}).
In that case, use @var{font-spec} for all the characters belonging to
the script.
@var{character} may be a script name (@pxref{Character Properties,
char-script-table}). In that case, use @var{font-spec} for all the
characters belonging to the script.
@var{character} may be @code{nil}, which means to use @var{font-spec}
for any character which no font-spec is specified.
......
......@@ -220,10 +220,23 @@ https://lists.gnu.org/r/emacs-devel/2013-11/msg00515.html
width fonts. However, more features are still needed to achieve this.
** Support ligatures out of the box
For the list of typographical ligatures, see
For the list of frequently-used typographical ligatures, see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthographic_ligature#Ligatures_in_Unicode_(Latin_alphabets)
(Note that in general, the number of possible ligatures can be much
larger, and there's no way, in principle, to specify the superset of
all the ligatures that could exist. Each font can support different
ligatures. The reliable way of supporting any and all ligatures is to
hand all text to be displayed to the shaping engine and get back the
font glyphs to display that text. However, doing this is impossible
with the current design of the Emacs display engine, since it examines
buffer text one character at a time, and implements character
composition by calls to Lisp, which makes doing this for every
character impractically slow. Therefore, the rest of this item
describes a limited form of ligature support which is compatible with
the current display engine design and uses automatic compositions.)
For Text and derived modes, the job is to figure out which ligatures
we want to support, how to let the user customize that, and probably
define a minor mode for automatic ligation (as some contexts might not
......@@ -237,12 +250,12 @@ prettify-symbols-mode. We need to figure out which ligatures are
needed for each programming language, and provide user options to turn
this on and off.
The implementation should use the infrastructure for character
compositions, i.e., we should define appropriate regexp-based rules
for character sequences that need to be composed into ligatures, and
populate composition-function-table with those rules. See
composite.el for examples of this, and also grep lisp/language/*.el
for references to composition-function-table.
The implementation should use the infrastructure for automatic
character compositions, i.e., we should define appropriate
regexp-based rules for character sequences that need to be composed
into ligatures, and populate composition-function-table with those
rules. See composite.el for examples of this, and also grep
lisp/language/*.el for references to composition-function-table.
One problem with character compositions that will need to be solved is
that composition-function-table, the char-table which holds the
......@@ -259,7 +272,11 @@ way of preventing the ligation from happening. One possibility is to
have a ZWNJ character separate these ASCII characters; another
possibility is to introduce a special text property that prevents
character composition, and place that property on the relevant parts
of the mode line.
of the mode line. Yet another possibility would be to write a
specialized composition function, which would detect that it is called
on mode-line strings, and return nil to signal that composition is not
possible in this case; then use that function in the rules for
ligatures stored in composition-function-table.
The prettify-symbols-mode should be deprecated once ligature support
is in place.
......
......@@ -4112,7 +4112,11 @@ MODES is as for `set-default-file-modes'."
;; now, but it generates slower code.
(defmacro save-match-data (&rest body)
"Execute the BODY forms, restoring the global value of the match data.
The value returned is the value of the last form in BODY."
The value returned is the value of the last form in BODY.
NOTE: The convention in Elisp is that any function, except for a few
exceptions like car/assoc/+/goto-char, can clobber the match data,
so `save-match-data' should normally be used to save *your* match data
rather than your caller's match data."
;; It is better not to use backquote here,
;; because that makes a bootstrapping problem
;; if you need to recompile all the Lisp files using interpreted code.
......
......@@ -6519,7 +6519,15 @@ acl_get_file (const char *fname, acl_type_t type)
if (!get_file_security (fname, si, psd, sd_len, &sd_len))
{
xfree (psd);
errno = EIO;
err = GetLastError ();
if (err == ERROR_NOT_SUPPORTED)
errno = ENOTSUP;
else if (err == ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND
|| err == ERROR_PATH_NOT_FOUND
|| err == ERROR_INVALID_NAME)
errno = ENOENT;
else
errno = EIO;
psd = NULL;
}
}
......@@ -6530,6 +6538,8 @@ acl_get_file (const char *fname, acl_type_t type)
be encoded in the current ANSI codepage. */
|| err == ERROR_INVALID_NAME)
errno = ENOENT;
else if (err == ERROR_NOT_SUPPORTED)
errno = ENOTSUP;
else
errno = EIO;
}
......
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