Commit d4913798 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

Misc fixes for Lisp manual.

* doc/lispref/intro.texi (A Sample Function Description): Fix incorrect
markup, undoing previous change.
(A Sample Variable Description): Minor clarifications and markup
improvements.

* doc/lispref/elisp.texi (Top):
* doc/lispref/text.texi (Text): Fix menu order.
parent 7dca65a4
2012-07-06 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* intro.texi (A Sample Function Description): Fix incorrect
markup, undoing previous change.
(A Sample Variable Description): Minor clarifications and markup
improvements.
* elisp.texi (Top):
* text.texi (Text): Fix menu order.
2012-07-06 Richard Stallman <rms@gnu.org>
* intro.texi (Evaluation Notation, A Sample Function Description):
......
......@@ -1123,9 +1123,9 @@ Text
* Case Changes:: Case conversion of parts of the buffer.
* Text Properties:: Assigning Lisp property lists to text characters.
* Substitution:: Replacing a given character wherever it appears.
* Transposition:: Swapping two portions of a buffer.
* Registers:: How registers are implemented. Accessing
the text or position stored in a register.
* Transposition:: Swapping two portions of a buffer.
* Base 64:: Conversion to or from base 64 encoding.
* Checksum/Hash:: Computing cryptographic hashes.
* Parsing HTML/XML:: Parsing HTML and XML.
......
......@@ -379,24 +379,25 @@ More generally,
@end example
@end defun
Any argument whose name contains the name of a type (e.g.,
@var{integer}, @var{integer1} or @var{buffer}) is expected to be of that
type. A plural of a type (such as @var{buffers}) often means a list of
objects of that type. An argument named @var{object} may be of any type.
(For a list of Emacs object types, @pxref{Lisp Data Types}.) An argument
with some other sort of name (e.g., @var{new-file}) is discussed
specifically in the description of the function. In some sections,
features common to the arguments of several functions are described at
the beginning.
For a more complete description of arguments modified by
@code{&optional} and @code{&rest}, @pxref{Lambda Expressions}.
By convention, any argument whose name contains the name of a type
(e.g.@: @var{integer}, @var{integer1} or @var{buffer}) is expected to
be of that type. A plural of a type (such as @var{buffers}) often
means a list of objects of that type. An argument named @var{object}
may be of any type. (For a list of Emacs object types, @pxref{Lisp
Data Types}.) An argument with any other sort of name
(e.g.@: @var{new-file}) is specific to the function; if the function
has a documentation string, the type of the argument should be
described there (@pxref{Documentation}).
@xref{Lambda Expressions}, for a more complete description of
arguments modified by @code{&optional} and @code{&rest}.
Command, macro, and special form descriptions have the same format,
but the word `Function' is replaced by `Command', `Macro', or `Special
Form', respectively. Commands are simply functions that may be called
interactively; macros process their arguments differently from functions
(the arguments are not evaluated), but are presented the same way.
but the word @samp{Function} is replaced by @samp{Command},
@samp{Macro}, or @samp{Special Form}, respectively. Commands are
simply functions that may be called interactively; macros process
their arguments differently from functions (the arguments are not
evaluated), but are presented the same way.
The descriptions of macros and special forms use a more complex
notation to specify optional and repeated arguments, because they can
......@@ -445,14 +446,14 @@ from @var{body}, which includes all remaining elements of the form.
@cindex variable descriptions
@cindex option descriptions
A @dfn{variable} is a name that can be bound to an object; binding
is frequently referred to as @dfn{setting}, and the object to which
a variable is set is often called a @dfn{value} that the variable
@dfn{holds}. Although nearly all variables can be set by the user,
certain variables exist specifically so that users can change them;
these are called @dfn{user options}. Ordinary variables and user
options are described using a format like that for functions, except
that there are no arguments.
A @dfn{variable} is a name that can be @dfn{bound} (or @dfn{set}) to
an object. The object to which a variable is bound is called a
@dfn{value}; we say also that variable @dfn{holds} that value.
Although nearly all variables can be set by the user, certain
variables exist specifically so that users can change them; these are
called @dfn{user options}. Ordinary variables and user options are
described using a format like that for functions, except that there
are no arguments.
Here is a description of the imaginary @code{electric-future-map}
variable.@refill
......@@ -463,8 +464,8 @@ Future mode. The functions in this map allow you to edit commands you
have not yet thought about executing.
@end defvar
User option descriptions have the same format, but `Variable' is
replaced by `User Option'.
User option descriptions have the same format, but @samp{Variable}
is replaced by @samp{User Option}.
@node Version Info
@section Version Information
......
......@@ -51,9 +51,9 @@ the character after point.
* Case Changes:: Case conversion of parts of the buffer.
* Text Properties:: Assigning Lisp property lists to text characters.
* Substitution:: Replacing a given character wherever it appears.
* Transposition:: Swapping two portions of a buffer.
* Registers:: How registers are implemented. Accessing the text or
position stored in a register.
* Transposition:: Swapping two portions of a buffer.
* Base 64:: Conversion to or from base 64 encoding.
* Checksum/Hash:: Computing cryptographic hashes.
* Parsing HTML/XML:: Parsing HTML and XML.
......
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