Commit d691e30c authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

More improvements of the Emacs manual

* doc/emacs/rmail.texi (Rmail Reply, Rmail Sorting): Improve
wording.  Suggested by Daniel Chakraborty
<danielmchakraborty@gmail.com>.

* doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Add cross-references.
Improve and clarify wording.  Suggested by Gijs Hillenius
<gijs@hillenius.net> in emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.

* doc/emacs/text.texi (Org Authoring): Add more supported formats
to the list.
(TeX Print): Improve wording.  Slightly rearrange stuff.
(TeX Misc): Mention doctex-mode-hook.
(Two-Column): Minor rearrangement of text.  Suggested by Michael
Albinus <michael.albinus@gmx.de> in emacs-manual-bugs@gnu.org.

* doc/emacs/misc.texi (Saving Emacs Sessions):
* doc/emacs/programs.texi (Program Modes): Remove redundant text
and index entries.
parent 6719f05f
......@@ -103,13 +103,14 @@ supports both of these forms, as well as any mixture of them---this
is ``bidirectional text''. @xref{Bidirectional Editing}.
@item Bind
@anchor{Glossary---Bind}
To bind a key sequence means to give it a binding (q.v.).
@xref{Rebinding}.
@anchor{Glossary---Binding}
@item Binding
A key sequence gets its meaning in Emacs by having a binding, which is a
command (q.v.), a Lisp function that is run when you type that
command (q.v.)---a Lisp function that is run when you type that
sequence. @xref{Commands,Binding}. Customization often involves
rebinding a character to a different command function. The bindings of
all key sequences are recorded in the keymaps (q.v.). @xref{Keymaps}.
......@@ -141,8 +142,8 @@ are visiting (q.v.@:) some file. @xref{Buffers}.
@item Buffer Selection History
Emacs keeps a buffer selection history that records how recently each
Emacs buffer has been selected. This is used for choosing a buffer to
select. @xref{Buffers}.
Emacs buffer has been selected. This is used for choosing which
buffer to select. @xref{Buffers}.
@item Bug
A bug is an incorrect or unreasonable behavior of a program, or
......@@ -220,9 +221,9 @@ the clipboard is used @emph{instead} of the primary selection.
@xref{Clipboard}.
@item Coding System
A coding system is an encoding for representing text characters in a
file or in a stream of information. Emacs has the ability to convert
text to or from a variety of coding systems when reading or writing it.
A coding system is a way to encode text characters in a file or in a
stream of information. Emacs has the ability to convert text to or
from a variety of coding systems when reading or writing it.
@xref{Coding Systems}.
@item Command
......@@ -263,12 +264,12 @@ executes faster.
@item Complete Key
A complete key is a key sequence that fully specifies one action to be
performed by Emacs. For example, @kbd{X} and @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-x m}
are complete keys. Complete keys derive their meanings from being bound
(q.v.@:) to commands (q.v.). Thus, @kbd{X} is conventionally bound to
a command to insert @samp{X} in the buffer; @kbd{C-x m} is
conventionally bound to a command to begin composing a mail message.
@xref{Keys}.
performed by Emacs. For example, @kbd{X} and @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-x
m} are complete keys. Complete keys derive their meanings from being
bound (@pxref{Glossary---Bind}) to commands (q.v.). Thus, @kbd{X} is
conventionally bound to a command to insert @samp{X} in the buffer;
@kbd{C-x m} is conventionally bound to a command to begin composing a
mail message. @xref{Keys}.
@item Completion
Completion is what Emacs does when it automatically expands an
......@@ -281,11 +282,11 @@ file names. Completion usually occurs when @key{TAB}, @key{SPC} or
@anchor{Glossary---Continuation Line}
@item Continuation Line
When a line of text is longer than the width of the window, it
normally (but see @ref{Glossary---Truncation}) takes up more than one
screen line when displayed. We say that the text line is continued, and all
screen lines used for it after the first are called continuation
lines. @xref{Continuation Lines}. A related Emacs feature is
filling (q.v.).
normally takes up more than one screen line when displayed (but see
@ref{Glossary---Truncation}). We say that the text line is continued,
and all screen lines used for it after the first are called
continuation lines. @xref{Continuation Lines}. A related Emacs
feature is filling (q.v.).
@item Control Character
A control character is a character that you type by holding down the
......@@ -418,7 +419,7 @@ Variables}.
On GNU and other Unix-like systems, directory names are strings that
end in @samp{/}. For example, @file{/no-such-dir/} is a directory
name whereas @file{/tmp} is not, even though @file{/tmp} names a file
that happens to be a directory. On MS-DOS the relationship is more
that happens to be a directory. On MS-Windows the relationship is more
complicated. @xref{Directory Names,,, elisp, the Emacs Lisp Reference
Manual}.
......
......@@ -2463,12 +2463,6 @@ sessions, or add this line in your init file (@pxref{Init File}):
(desktop-save-mode 1)
@end example
@vindex desktop-auto-save-timeout
@noindent
When @code{desktop-save-mode} is active and the desktop file exists,
Emacs auto-saves it every @code{desktop-auto-save-timeout}
seconds, if that is non-@code{nil} and non-zero.
@findex desktop-change-dir
@findex desktop-revert
@vindex desktop-path
......
......@@ -77,7 +77,6 @@ mode for the C programming language is @code{c-mode}.
@cindex VHDL mode
@cindex M4 mode
@cindex Shell-script mode
@cindex Scheme mode
@cindex OPascal mode
@cindex PostScript mode
@cindex Conf mode
......
......@@ -802,7 +802,7 @@ its contents.
@vindex rmail-enable-mime-composing
@findex unforward-rmail-message
Rmail offers two formats for forwarded messages. The default is to
use MIME (@pxref{Rmail Display}) format. This includes the original
use the MIME format (@pxref{Rmail Display}). This includes the original
message as a separate part. You can use a simpler format if you
prefer, by setting the variable @code{rmail-enable-mime-composing} to
@code{nil}. In this case, Rmail just includes the original message
......@@ -1092,7 +1092,7 @@ Sort messages of current Rmail buffer by author's name.
@findex rmail-sort-by-recipient
@item C-c C-s C-r
@itemx M-x rmail-sort-by-recipient
Sort messages of current Rmail buffer by recipient's names.
Sort messages of current Rmail buffer by recipient's name.
@findex rmail-sort-by-correspondent
@item C-c C-s C-c
......
......@@ -1451,8 +1451,9 @@ etc.
export and publication. To export the current buffer, type @kbd{C-c
C-e} (@code{org-export}) anywhere in an Org buffer. This command
prompts for an export format; currently supported formats include
HTML, @LaTeX{}, OpenDocument (@file{.odt}), and PDF@. Some formats,
such as PDF, require certain system tools to be installed.
HTML, @LaTeX{}, Texinfo, OpenDocument (@file{.odt}), iCalendar,
Markdown, man-page, and PDF@. Some formats, such as PDF, require
certain system tools to be installed.
@vindex org-publish-project-alist
To export several files at once to a specific directory, either
......@@ -1511,14 +1512,14 @@ with @LaTeX{}.}.
Emacs provides a @TeX{} major mode for each of these variants: Plain
@TeX{} mode, @LaTeX{} mode, Doc@TeX{} mode, and Sli@TeX{} mode. Emacs
selects the appropriate mode by looking at the contents of the buffer.
(This is done by the @code{tex-mode} command, which is normally called
automatically when you visit a @TeX{}-like file. @xref{Choosing
Modes}.) If the contents are insufficient to determine this, Emacs
chooses the mode specified by the variable @code{tex-default-mode};
its default value is @code{latex-mode}. If Emacs does not guess
right, you can select the correct variant of @TeX{} mode using the
command @kbd{M-x plain-tex-mode}, @kbd{M-x latex-mode}, @kbd{M-x
slitex-mode}, or @kbd{doctex-mode}.
(This is done by invoking the @code{tex-mode} command, which is
normally called automatically when you visit a @TeX{}-like file.
@xref{Choosing Modes}.) If the contents are insufficient to determine
this, Emacs chooses the mode specified by the variable
@code{tex-default-mode}; its default value is @code{latex-mode}. If
Emacs does not guess right, you can select the correct variant of
@TeX{} mode using the command @kbd{M-x plain-tex-mode}, @kbd{M-x
latex-mode}, @kbd{M-x slitex-mode}, or @kbd{doctex-mode}.
The following sections document the features of @TeX{} mode and its
variants. There are several other @TeX{}-related Emacs packages,
......@@ -1691,14 +1692,16 @@ chapter of a larger document).
@table @kbd
@item C-c C-b
Invoke @TeX{} on the entire current buffer (@code{tex-buffer}).
@item C-c C-r
Invoke @TeX{} on the current region, together with the buffer's header
(@code{tex-region}).
@item C-c C-f
Invoke @TeX{} on the current file (@code{tex-file}).
@item C-c C-v
Preview the output from the last @kbd{C-c C-r}, @kbd{C-c C-b}, or @kbd{C-c
Preview the output from the last @kbd{C-c C-b}, @kbd{C-c C-r}, or @kbd{C-c
C-f} command (@code{tex-view}).
@item C-c C-p
......@@ -1733,7 +1736,7 @@ C-p} (@code{tex-print}) to print a hardcopy of the output file.
@cindex @env{TEXINPUTS} environment variable
@vindex tex-directory
By default, @kbd{C-c C-b} runs @TeX{} in the current directory. The
output of @TeX{} also goes in this directory. To run @TeX{} in a
output of @TeX{} is also created in this directory. To run @TeX{} in a
different directory, change the variable @code{tex-directory} to
the desired directory. If your environment variable @env{TEXINPUTS}
contains relative names, or if your files contain
......@@ -1879,14 +1882,16 @@ keys (@pxref{Completion}).
@vindex tex-shell-hook
@vindex tex-mode-hook
@vindex doctex-mode-hook
@vindex latex-mode-hook
@vindex slitex-mode-hook
@vindex plain-tex-mode-hook
Entering any variant of @TeX{} mode runs the hooks
@code{text-mode-hook} and @code{tex-mode-hook}. Then it runs either
@code{plain-tex-mode-hook}, @code{latex-mode-hook}, or
@code{slitex-mode-hook}, whichever is appropriate. Starting the
@TeX{} shell runs the hook @code{tex-shell-hook}. @xref{Hooks}.
@code{plain-tex-mode-hook}, @code{doctex-mode-hook},
@code{latex-mode-hook}, or @code{slitex-mode-hook}, whichever is
appropriate. Starting the @TeX{} shell runs the hook
@code{tex-shell-hook}. @xref{Hooks}.
@findex iso-iso2tex
@findex iso-tex2iso
......@@ -2903,7 +2908,7 @@ right-hand buffer.)
@kindex F2 RET
@kindex C-x 6 RET
@findex 2C-newline
The command @kbd{C-x 6 @key{RET}} or @kbd{@key{F2} @key{RET}}
The command @kbd{@key{F2} @key{RET}} or @kbd{C-x 6 @key{RET}}
(@code{2C-newline}) inserts a newline in each of the two buffers at
corresponding positions. This is the easiest way to add a new line to
the two-column text while editing it in split buffers.
......
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