Commit d74833a2 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

(Communication Coding): Say "other applications".

(Fontsets): Not specific to X.  Add xref to X Resources.
(Unibyte Mode): Renamed from Single-Byte Character Support.
"Graphical display", not window system.
(International): Update menu.
parent 191f7d86
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ your language environment. If
your keyboard can produce non-@acronym{ASCII} characters, you can select an
appropriate keyboard coding system (@pxref{Terminal Coding}), and Emacs
will accept those characters. Latin-1 characters can also be input by
using the @kbd{C-x 8} prefix, see @ref{Single-Byte Character Support,
using the @kbd{C-x 8} prefix, see @ref{Unibyte Mode}.
C-x 8}.
On X Window systems, your locale should be set to an appropriate value
......@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@ to make sure Emacs interprets keyboard input correctly; see
that cover the whole spectrum of characters.
* Defining Fontsets:: Defining a new fontset.
* Undisplayable Characters:: When characters don't display.
* Single-Byte Character Support:: You can pick one European character set
* Unibyte Mode:: You can pick one European character set
to use without multibyte characters.
* Charsets:: How Emacs groups its internal character codes.
@end menu
......@@ -1000,11 +1000,11 @@ in communication with other processes.
@table @kbd
@item C-x @key{RET} x @var{coding} @key{RET}
Use coding system @var{coding} for transferring selections to and from
other programs through the window system.
other window-based applications.
@item C-x @key{RET} X @var{coding} @key{RET}
Use coding system @var{coding} for transferring @emph{one}
selection---the next one---to or from the window system.
selection---the next one---to or from another window-based application.
@item C-x @key{RET} p @var{input-coding} @key{RET} @var{output-coding} @key{RET}
Use coding systems @var{input-coding} and @var{output-coding} for
......@@ -1166,34 +1166,39 @@ non-graphic characters.
@section Fontsets
@cindex fontsets
A font for X Windows typically defines shapes for a single alphabet
or script. Therefore, displaying the entire range of scripts that
Emacs supports requires a collection of many fonts. In Emacs, such a
collection is called a @dfn{fontset}. A fontset is defined by a list
of fonts, each assigned to handle a range of character codes.
Each fontset has a name, like a font. The available X fonts are
defined by the X server; fontsets, however, are defined within Emacs
itself. Once you have defined a fontset, you can use it within Emacs by
specifying its name, anywhere that you could use a single font. Of
course, Emacs fontsets can use only the fonts that the X server
supports; if certain characters appear on the screen as hollow boxes,
this means that the fontset in use for them has no font for those
characters.@footnote{The Emacs installation instructions have information on
additional font support.}
A font typically defines shapes for a single alphabet or script.
Therefore, displaying the entire range of scripts that Emacs supports
requires a collection of many fonts. In Emacs, such a collection is
called a @dfn{fontset}. A fontset is defined by a list of fonts, each
assigned to handle a range of character codes.
Each fontset has a name, like a font. However, while fonts are
stored in the system and the available font names are defined by the
system, fontsets are defined within Emacs itself. Once you have
defined a fontset, you can use it within Emacs by specifying its name,
anywhere that you could use a single font. Of course, Emacs fontsets
can use only the fonts that the system supports; if certain characters
appear on the screen as hollow boxes, this means that the fontset in
use for them has no font for those characters.@footnote{The Emacs
installation instructions have information on additional font
support.}
Emacs creates two fontsets automatically: the @dfn{standard fontset}
and the @dfn{startup fontset}. The standard fontset is most likely to
have fonts for a wide variety of non-@acronym{ASCII} characters;
however, this is not the default for Emacs to use. (By default, Emacs
tries to find a font that has bold and italic variants.) You can
specify use of the standard fontset with the @samp{-fn} option, or
with the @samp{Font} X resource (@pxref{Font X}). For example,
specify use of the standard fontset with the @samp{-fn} option. For
example,
@example
emacs -fn fontset-standard
@end example
@noindent
You can also specify a fontset with the @samp{Font} resource (@pxref{X
Resources}).
A fontset does not necessarily specify a font for every character
code. If a fontset specifies no font for a certain character, or if it
specifies a font that does not exist on your system, then it cannot
......@@ -1353,8 +1358,8 @@ Latin-1 characters and @acronym{ASCII} mnemonics. Customize the variable
@code{latin1-display} to enable this. The mnemonic @acronym{ASCII}
sequences mostly correspond to those of the prefix input methods.
@node Single-Byte Character Support
@section Single-byte Character Set Support
@node Unibyte Mode
@section Unibyte Editing Mode
@cindex European character sets
@cindex accented characters
......@@ -1376,8 +1381,8 @@ non-@acronym{ASCII} characters.
@vindex unibyte-display-via-language-environment
Emacs can also display those characters, provided the terminal or font
in use supports them. This works automatically. Alternatively, if you
are using a window system, Emacs can also display single-byte characters
in use supports them. This works automatically. Alternatively, on a
graphical display, Emacs can also display single-byte characters
through fontsets, in effect by displaying the equivalent multibyte
characters according to the current language environment. To request
this, set the variable @code{unibyte-display-via-language-environment}
......
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