Commit d7e9a7f8 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii
Browse files

Fix bug #17362 with inconsistent usage of @key and @kbd, and key names.

 doc/emacs/trouble.texi (Quitting, DEL Does Not Delete, Emergency Escape)
 (Bug Criteria): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.  (Bug#17362)
 doc/emacs/text.texi (Words, Pages, Foldout, HTML Mode): Fix usage of @kbd
 and @key.
 doc/emacs/search.texi (Special Isearch, Regexp Search): Fix usage of @kbd
 and @key.
 doc/emacs/screen.texi (Echo Area, Menu Bar): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/rmail.texi (Rmail Scrolling): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/programs.texi (Hungry Delete, Other C Commands): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/picture-xtra.texi (Insert in Picture): Fix usage of @kbd and
 @key.
 doc/emacs/mule.texi (Unibyte Mode, Bidirectional Editing): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/msdog.texi (Windows Keyboard, Windows Processes): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/msdog-xtra.texi (MS-DOS Keyboard, MS-DOS Printing)
 (MS-DOS Processes): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/misc.texi (Shell Ring, Printing Package): Fix usage of @kbd and
 @key.
 doc/emacs/mini.texi (Completion Commands, Minibuffer History): Fix usage
 of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/kmacro.texi (Keyboard Macro Step-Edit): Fix usage of @kbd and
 @key.
 doc/emacs/killing.texi (Deletion, Rectangles, CUA Bindings): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/indent.texi (Indentation Commands): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/help.texi (Help Mode, Misc Help): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/glossary.texi (Glossary): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/frames.texi (Speedbar): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/files.texi (Misc File Ops, File Name Cache, File Conveniences)
 (Filesets): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/display.texi (View Mode): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/dired.texi (Image-Dired): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/custom.texi (Modifier Keys, Function Keys, Named ASCII Chars)
 (Init Syntax): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/commands.texi (User Input): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/calendar.texi (Counting Days, General Calendar): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/building.texi (Threads Buffer): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
 doc/emacs/buffers.texi (Select Buffer, Icomplete): Fix usage of @kbd and
 @key.
 doc/emacs/basic.texi (Inserting Text, Erasing, Arguments): Fix usage of
 @kbd and @key.
parent 2785da24
2014-04-29 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* trouble.texi (Quitting, DEL Does Not Delete, Emergency Escape)
(Bug Criteria): Fix usage of @kbd and @key. (Bug#17362)
* text.texi (Words, Pages, Foldout, HTML Mode): Fix usage of @kbd
and @key.
* search.texi (Special Isearch, Regexp Search): Fix usage of @kbd
and @key.
* screen.texi (Echo Area, Menu Bar): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* rmail.texi (Rmail Scrolling): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* programs.texi (Hungry Delete, Other C Commands): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
* picture-xtra.texi (Insert in Picture): Fix usage of @kbd and
@key.
* mule.texi (Unibyte Mode, Bidirectional Editing): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
* msdog.texi (Windows Keyboard, Windows Processes): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
* msdog-xtra.texi (MS-DOS Keyboard, MS-DOS Printing)
(MS-DOS Processes): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* misc.texi (Shell Ring, Printing Package): Fix usage of @kbd and
@key.
* mini.texi (Completion Commands, Minibuffer History): Fix usage
of @kbd and @key.
* kmacro.texi (Keyboard Macro Step-Edit): Fix usage of @kbd and
@key.
* killing.texi (Deletion, Rectangles, CUA Bindings): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
* indent.texi (Indentation Commands): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* help.texi (Help Mode, Misc Help): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* glossary.texi (Glossary): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* frames.texi (Speedbar): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* files.texi (Misc File Ops, File Name Cache, File Conveniences)
(Filesets): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* display.texi (View Mode): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* dired.texi (Image-Dired): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* custom.texi (Modifier Keys, Function Keys, Named ASCII Chars)
(Init Syntax): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* commands.texi (User Input): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* calendar.texi (Counting Days, General Calendar): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
* building.texi (Threads Buffer): Fix usage of @kbd and @key.
* buffers.texi (Select Buffer, Icomplete): Fix usage of @kbd and
@key.
* basic.texi (Inserting Text, Erasing, Arguments): Fix usage of
@kbd and @key.
2014-04-26 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* sending.texi (Mail Signature): Document signature variables used
......
......@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ instead of shoving it to the right. @xref{Minor Modes}.
@findex quoted-insert
Only graphic characters can be inserted by typing the associated
key; other keys act as editing commands and do not insert themselves.
For instance, @kbd{DEL} runs the command @code{delete-backward-char}
For instance, @key{DEL} runs the command @code{delete-backward-char}
by default (some modes bind it to a different command); it does not
insert a literal @samp{DEL} character (@acronym{ASCII} character code
127).
......@@ -366,7 +366,7 @@ moves down into it.
@table @kbd
@item @key{DEL}
@itemx @key{Backspace}
@itemx @key{BACKSPACE}
Delete the character before point, or the region if it is active
(@code{delete-backward-char}).
......@@ -394,20 +394,20 @@ the preceding newline, joining this line to the previous one.
If, however, the region is active, @kbd{@key{DEL}} instead deletes
the text in the region. @xref{Mark}, for a description of the region.
On most keyboards, @key{DEL} is labeled @key{Backspace}, but we
On most keyboards, @key{DEL} is labeled @key{BACKSPACE}, but we
refer to it as @key{DEL} in this manual. (Do not confuse @key{DEL}
with the @key{Delete} key; we will discuss @key{Delete} momentarily.)
On some text terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
properly. @xref{DEL Does Not Delete}, if you encounter this problem.
The @key{delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
The @key{Delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e., the
character under the cursor. If point was at the end of a line, this
joins the following line onto this one. Like @kbd{@key{DEL}}, it
deletes the text in the region if the region is active (@pxref{Mark}).
@kbd{C-d} (@code{delete-char}) deletes the character after point,
similar to @key{delete}, but regardless of whether the region is
similar to @key{Delete}, but regardless of whether the region is
active.
@xref{Deletion}, for more detailed information about the above
......@@ -723,7 +723,7 @@ M-5 C-n
moves down five lines. The keys @kbd{M-1}, @kbd{M-2}, and so on, as
well as @kbd{M--}, are bound to commands (@code{digit-argument} and
@code{negative-argument}) that set up an argument for the next
command. @kbd{Meta--} without digits normally means @minus{}1.
command. @kbd{M--} without digits normally means @minus{}1.
If you enter more than one digit, you need not hold down the
@key{META} key for the second and subsequent digits. Thus, to move
......
......@@ -74,9 +74,9 @@ Similar, but select @var{buffer} in another window
@item C-x 5 b @var{buffer} @key{RET}
Similar, but select @var{buffer} in a separate frame
(@code{switch-to-buffer-other-frame}).
@item C-x @key{LEFT}
@item C-x @key{left}
Select the previous buffer in the buffer list (@code{previous-buffer}).
@item C-x @key{RIGHT}
@item C-x @key{right}
Select the next buffer in the buffer list (@code{next-buffer}).
@item C-u M-g M-g
@itemx C-u M-g g
......@@ -110,15 +110,15 @@ it, Emacs asks for the file name to use, and the buffer's major mode
is re-established taking that file name into account (@pxref{Choosing
Modes}).
@kindex C-x @key{LEFT}
@kindex C-x @key{RIGHT}
@kindex C-x @key{left}
@kindex C-x @key{right}
@findex next-buffer
@findex previous-buffer
For conveniently switching between a few buffers, use the commands
@kbd{C-x @key{LEFT}} and @kbd{C-x @key{RIGHT}}. @kbd{C-x @key{LEFT}}
@kbd{C-x @key{left}} and @kbd{C-x @key{right}}. @kbd{C-x @key{left}}
(@code{previous-buffer}) selects the previous buffer (following the
order of most recent selection in the current frame), while @kbd{C-x
@key{RIGHT}} (@code{next-buffer}) moves through buffers in the reverse
@key{right}} (@code{next-buffer}) moves through buffers in the reverse
direction.
@kindex C-x 4 b
......@@ -661,17 +661,18 @@ element among the possible completions in a minibuffer. When enabled, typing
in the minibuffer continuously displays a list of possible completions that
match the string you have typed.
At any time, you can type @key{C-j} to select the first completion in
At any time, you can type @kbd{C-j} to select the first completion in
the list. So the way to select a particular completion is to make it the
first in the list. There are two ways to do this. You can type more
of the completion name and thus narrow down the list, excluding unwanted
completions above the desired one. Alternatively, you can use @kbd{C-.}
and @kbd{C-,} to rotate the list until the desired buffer is first.
@key{M-TAB} will select the first completion in the list, like @key{C-j} but
without exiting the minibuffer, so you can edit it further. This is typically
used when entering a file name, where @key{M-TAB} can be used a few times to
descend in the hierarchy of directories.
@kbd{M-@key{TAB}} will select the first completion in the list, like
@kbd{C-j} but without exiting the minibuffer, so you can edit it
further. This is typically used when entering a file name, where
@kbd{M-@key{TAB}} can be used a few times to descend in the hierarchy
of directories.
To enable Icomplete mode, type @kbd{M-x icomplete-mode}, or customize
the variable @code{icomplete-mode} to @code{t} (@pxref{Easy
......
......@@ -1005,7 +1005,7 @@ non-@code{nil}, the GDB Threads buffer is the one shown by default.
The GDB Threads buffer displays a summary of the threads in the
debugged program. @xref{Threads, Threads, Debugging programs with
multiple threads, gdb, The GNU debugger}. To select a thread, move
point there and type @key{RET} (@code{gdb-select-thread}), or click on
point there and press @key{RET} (@code{gdb-select-thread}), or click on
it with @kbd{Mouse-2}. This also displays the associated source
buffer, and updates the contents of the other GDB buffers.
......
......@@ -288,7 +288,7 @@ Display the number of days in the current region
@kindex M-= @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex calendar-count-days-region
To determine the number of days in a range, set the mark on one
date using @kbd{C-SPC}, move point to another date, and type @kbd{M-=}
date using @kbd{C-@key{SPC}}, move point to another date, and type @kbd{M-=}
(@code{calendar-count-days-region}). The numbers of days shown is
@emph{inclusive}; that is, it includes the days specified by mark and
point.
......@@ -301,10 +301,10 @@ point.
Display day-in-year (@code{calendar-print-day-of-year}).
@item C-c C-l
Regenerate the calendar window (@code{calendar-redraw}).
@item SPC
@item @key{SPC}
Scroll the next window up (@code{scroll-other-window}).
@item DEL
@itemx S-SPC
@item @key{DEL}
@itemx S-@key{SPC}
Scroll the next window down (@code{scroll-other-window-down}).
@item q
Exit from calendar (@code{calendar-exit}).
......@@ -327,8 +327,8 @@ date.
non-Calendar-mode editing commands.)
@kindex SPC @r{(Calendar mode)}
In Calendar mode, you can use @kbd{SPC} (@code{scroll-other-window})
and @kbd{DEL} (@code{scroll-other-window-down}) to scroll the other
In Calendar mode, you can use @key{SPC} (@code{scroll-other-window})
and @key{DEL} (@code{scroll-other-window-down}) to scroll the other
window (if there is one) up or down, respectively. This is handy when
you display a list of holidays or diary entries in another window.
......
......@@ -42,28 +42,28 @@ are certain characters found on non-English keyboards
@cindex modifier keys
@cindex Control
@cindex C-
@cindex Meta
@cindex META
@cindex M-
Emacs also recognizes control characters that are entered using
@dfn{modifier keys}. Two commonly-used modifier keys are
@key{Control} (usually labeled @key{Ctrl}), and @key{Meta} (usually
labeled @key{Alt})@footnote{We refer to @key{Alt} as @key{Meta} for
@key{Control} (usually labeled @key{Ctrl}), and @key{META} (usually
labeled @key{Alt})@footnote{We refer to @key{Alt} as @key{META} for
historical reasons.}. For example, @kbd{Control-a} is entered by
holding down the @key{Ctrl} key while pressing @kbd{a}; we will refer
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly @kbd{Meta-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly @kbd{@key{META}-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
for short, is entered by holding down the @key{Alt} key and pressing
@kbd{a}. Modifier keys can also be applied to non-alphanumerical
characters, e.g., @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{left}}.
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{Meta} key
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{META} key
You can also type Meta characters using two-character sequences
starting with @key{ESC}. Thus, you can enter @kbd{M-a} by typing
@kbd{@key{ESC} a}. You can enter @kbd{C-M-a} by typing @kbd{@key{ESC}
C-a}. Unlike @key{Meta}, @key{ESC} is entered as a separate
C-a}. Unlike @key{META}, @key{ESC} is entered as a separate
character. You don't hold down @key{ESC} while typing the next
character; instead, press @key{ESC} and release it, then enter the
next character. This feature is useful on certain text terminals
where the @key{Meta} key does not function reliably.
where the @key{META} key does not function reliably.
@cindex keys stolen by window manager
@cindex window manager, keys stolen by
......
......@@ -1766,11 +1766,11 @@ historical.
characters case-sensitive when you customize Emacs. For instance, you
could make @kbd{M-a} and @kbd{M-A} run different commands.
Although only the @key{Control} and @key{Meta} modifier keys are
Although only the @key{Control} and @key{META} modifier keys are
commonly used, Emacs supports three other modifier keys. These are
called @key{Super}, @key{Hyper} and @key{Alt}. Few terminals provide
ways to use these modifiers; the key labeled @key{Alt} on most
keyboards usually issues the @key{Meta} modifier, not @key{Alt}. The
keyboards usually issues the @key{META} modifier, not @key{Alt}. The
standard key bindings in Emacs do not include any characters with
these modifiers. However, you can customize Emacs to assign meanings
to them. The modifier bits are labeled as @samp{s-}, @samp{H-} and
......@@ -1836,8 +1836,8 @@ translates these keys to the corresponding keys in the main keyboard.
For example, when @samp{Num Lock} is on, the key labeled @samp{8} on
the numeric keypad produces @code{kp-8}, which is translated to
@kbd{8}; when @samp{Num Lock} is off, the same key produces
@code{kp-up}, which is translated to @key{UP}. If you rebind a key
such as @kbd{8} or @key{UP}, it affects the equivalent keypad key too.
@code{kp-up}, which is translated to @key{up}. If you rebind a key
such as @kbd{8} or @key{up}, it affects the equivalent keypad key too.
However, if you rebind a @samp{kp-} key directly, that won't affect
its non-keypad equivalent. Note that the modified keys are not
translated: for instance, if you hold down the @key{META} key while
......@@ -1860,7 +1860,7 @@ started out as names for certain @acronym{ASCII} control characters,
used so often that they have special keys of their own. For instance,
@key{TAB} was another name for @kbd{C-i}. Later, users found it
convenient to distinguish in Emacs between these keys and the ``same''
control characters typed with the @key{CTRL} key. Therefore, on most
control characters typed with the @key{Ctrl} key. Therefore, on most
modern terminals, they are no longer the same: @key{TAB} is different
from @kbd{C-i}.
......@@ -2187,8 +2187,8 @@ sequences are mandatory.
@samp{\C-} can be used as a prefix for a control character, as in
@samp{\C-s} for @acronym{ASCII} control-S, and @samp{\M-} can be used as a prefix for
a Meta character, as in @samp{\M-a} for @kbd{Meta-A} or @samp{\M-\C-a} for
@kbd{Control-Meta-A}.
a Meta character, as in @samp{\M-a} for @kbd{@key{META}-A} or
@samp{\M-\C-a} for @kbd{@key{Ctrl}-@key{META}-A}.
@xref{Init Non-ASCII}, for information about including
non-@acronym{ASCII} in your init file.
......
......@@ -1312,19 +1312,19 @@ takes a long time if the directory contains many image files, and it
asks for confirmation if the number of image files exceeds
@code{image-dired-show-all-from-dir-max-files}.
With point in the thumbnail buffer, you can type @kbd{RET}
With point in the thumbnail buffer, you can type @key{RET}
(@code{image-dired-display-thumbnail-original-image}) to display a
sized version of it in another window. This sizes the image to fit
the window. Use the arrow keys to move around in the buffer. For
easy browsing, use @kbd{SPC}
easy browsing, use @key{SPC}
(@code{image-dired-display-next-thumbnail-original}) to advance and
display the next image. Typing @kbd{DEL}
display the next image. Typing @key{DEL}
(@code{image-dired-display-previous-thumbnail-original}) backs up to
the previous thumbnail and displays that instead.
@vindex image-dired-external-viewer
To view and the image in its original size, either provide a prefix
argument (@kbd{C-u}) before pressing @kbd{RET}, or type
argument (@kbd{C-u}) before pressing @key{RET}, or type
@kbd{C-@key{RET}} (@code{image-dired-thumbnail-display-external}) to
display the image in an external viewer. You must first configure
@code{image-dired-external-viewer}.
......
......@@ -428,7 +428,7 @@ it. @xref{Disabling}.
screenfuls. It provides commands for scrolling through the buffer
conveniently but not for changing it. Apart from the usual Emacs
cursor motion commands, you can type @key{SPC} to scroll forward one
windowful, @key{S-SPC} or @key{DEL} to scroll backward, and @kbd{s} to
windowful, @key{S-@key{SPC}} or @key{DEL} to scroll backward, and @kbd{s} to
start an incremental search.
@kindex q @r{(View mode)}
......
......@@ -1569,10 +1569,11 @@ old meaning of the name @var{new} to be lost. If @var{old} and
@var{new} are on different file systems, the file @var{old} is copied
and deleted. If the argument @var{new} is just a directory name, the
real new name is in that directory, with the same non-directory
component as @var{old}. For example, @kbd{M-x rename-file RET ~/foo
RET /tmp RET} renames @file{~/foo} to @file{/tmp/foo}. The same rule
applies to all the remaining commands in this section. All of them
ask for confirmation when the new file name already exists, too.
component as @var{old}. For example, @kbd{M-x rename-file @key{RET}
~/foo @key{RET} /tmp @key{RET}} renames @file{~/foo} to
@file{/tmp/foo}. The same rule applies to all the remaining commands
in this section. All of them ask for confirmation when the new file
name already exists, too.
@ifnottex
If a file is under version control (@pxref{Version Control}), you
......@@ -1887,11 +1888,11 @@ then specifying @file{/tmp/foo*bar} will visit only
@findex file-cache-minibuffer-complete
You can use the @dfn{file name cache} to make it easy to locate a
file by name, without having to remember exactly where it is located.
When typing a file name in the minibuffer, @kbd{C-@key{tab}}
When typing a file name in the minibuffer, @kbd{C-@key{TAB}}
(@code{file-cache-minibuffer-complete}) completes it using the file
name cache. If you repeat @kbd{C-@key{tab}}, that cycles through the
name cache. If you repeat @kbd{C-@key{TAB}}, that cycles through the
possible completions of what you had originally typed. (However, note
that the @kbd{C-@key{tab}} character cannot be typed on most text
that the @kbd{C-@key{TAB}} character cannot be typed on most text
terminals.)
The file name cache does not fill up automatically. Instead, you
......@@ -1971,7 +1972,7 @@ previous image file in the same directory, respectively.
@vindex image-animate-loop
@cindex image animation
@cindex animated images
If the image can be animated, the command @kbd{RET}
If the image can be animated, the command @key{RET}
(@code{image-toggle-animation}) starts or stops the animation.
Animation plays once, unless the option @code{image-animate-loop} is
non-@code{nil}. With @kbd{f} (@code{image-next-frame}) and @kbd{b}
......@@ -2024,7 +2025,7 @@ adds a @samp{Filesets} menu to the menu bar.
@findex filesets-remove-buffer
The simplest way to define a fileset is by adding files to it one at
a time. To add a file to fileset @var{name}, visit the file and type
@kbd{M-x filesets-add-buffer @kbd{RET} @var{name} @kbd{RET}}. If
@kbd{M-x filesets-add-buffer @key{RET} @var{name} @key{RET}}. If
there is no fileset @var{name}, this creates a new one, which
initially contains only the current file. The command @kbd{M-x
filesets-remove-buffer} removes the current file from a fileset.
......
......@@ -802,8 +802,8 @@ When a file or directory is expanded, the @samp{[+]} changes to
hiding its contents.
You navigate through the speedbar using the keyboard, too. Typing
@kbd{RET} while point is on a line in the speedbar is equivalent to
clicking the item on the current line, and @kbd{SPC} expands or
@key{RET} while point is on a line in the speedbar is equivalent to
clicking the item on the current line, and @key{SPC} expands or
contracts the item. @kbd{U} displays the parent directory of the
current directory. To copy, delete, or rename the file on the current
line, type @kbd{C}, @kbd{D}, and @kbd{R} respectively. To create a
......
......@@ -26,10 +26,10 @@ When the mark is active, we call the region an active region.
@item Alt
Alt is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
have. To make a character Alt, type it while holding down the @key{ALT}
key. Such characters are given names that start with @kbd{Alt-}
have. To make a character Alt, type it while holding down the @key{Alt}
key. Such characters are given names that start with @kbd{@key{Alt}-}
(usually written @kbd{A-} for short). (Note that many terminals have a
key labeled @key{ALT} that is really a @key{META} key.) @xref{User
key labeled @key{Alt} that is really a @key{META} key.) @xref{User
Input, Alt}.
@item Argument
......@@ -269,8 +269,8 @@ lines. @xref{Continuation Lines}. A related Emacs feature is
@item Control Character
A control character is a character that you type by holding down the
@key{CTRL} key. Some control characters also have their own keys, so
that you can type them without using @key{CTRL}. For example,
@key{Ctrl} key. Some control characters also have their own keys, so
that you can type them without using @key{Ctrl}. For example,
@key{RET}, @key{TAB}, @key{ESC} and @key{DEL} are all control
characters. @xref{User Input}.
......@@ -284,8 +284,8 @@ around to empower users and encourage them to cooperate.
The particular form of copyleft used by the GNU project is called the
GNU General Public License. @xref{Copying}.
@item @key{CTRL}
The @key{CTRL} or ``control'' key is what you hold down
@item @key{Ctrl}
The @key{Ctrl} or ``control'' key is what you hold down
in order to enter a control character (q.v.). @xref{Glossary---C-}.
@item Current Buffer
......@@ -356,8 +356,8 @@ A defun is a major definition at the top level in a program. The name
@item @key{DEL}
@key{DEL} is a character that runs the command to delete one character
of text before the cursor. It is typically either the @key{DELETE}
key or the @key{BACKSPACE} key, whichever one is easy to type.
of text before the cursor. It is typically either the @key{Delete}
key or the @key{Backspace} key, whichever one is easy to type.
@xref{Erasing,DEL}.
@item Deletion
......@@ -687,7 +687,7 @@ changing any of its code. @xref{Hooks}.
@item Hyper
Hyper is the name of a modifier bit that a keyboard input character may
have. To make a character Hyper, type it while holding down the
@key{HYPER} key. Such characters are given names that start with
@key{Hyper} key. Such characters are given names that start with
@kbd{Hyper-} (usually written @kbd{H-} for short). @xref{User Input}.
@item Iff
......@@ -842,7 +842,7 @@ A local value of a variable (q.v.@:) applies to only one buffer.
@xref{Locals}.
@item @kbd{M-}
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{META},
@kbd{M-} in the name of a character is an abbreviation for @key{Meta},
one of the modifier keys that can accompany any character.
@xref{User Input,M-}.
......@@ -900,16 +900,16 @@ a keyboard interface to navigate it. @xref{Menu Bars}.
@item Meta
Meta is the name of a modifier bit which you can use in a command
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{META}
character. To enter a meta character, you hold down the @key{Meta}
key while typing the character. We refer to such characters with
names that start with @kbd{Meta-} (usually written @kbd{M-} for
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{META}
short). For example, @kbd{M-<} is typed by holding down @key{Meta}
and at the same time typing @kbd{<} (which itself is done, on most
terminals, by holding down @key{SHIFT} and typing @kbd{,}).
@xref{User Input,Meta}.
On some terminals, the @key{META} key is actually labeled @key{ALT}
or @key{EDIT}.
On some terminals, the @key{Meta} key is actually labeled @key{Alt}
or @key{Edit}.
@item Meta Character
A Meta character is one whose character code includes the Meta bit.
......
......@@ -378,7 +378,7 @@ alphabetical order, change the variable
Help buffers provide the same commands as View mode (@pxref{View
Mode}); for instance, @key{SPC} scrolls forward, and @key{DEL} or
@kbd{S-SPC} scrolls backward. A few special commands are also
@kbd{S-@key{SPC}} scrolls backward. A few special commands are also
provided:
@table @kbd
......@@ -553,13 +553,13 @@ Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}).
@findex describe-prefix-bindings
You can get a list of subcommands for a particular prefix key by
typing @kbd{C-h}, @kbd{?}, or @kbd{F1}
typing @kbd{C-h}, @kbd{?}, or @key{F1}
(@code{describe-prefix-bindings}) after the prefix key. (There are a
few prefix keys for which not all of these keys work---those that
provide their own bindings for one of them. One of these prefix keys
is @key{ESC} in combination with @kbd{C-h}, because @kbd{ESC C-h} is
actually @kbd{C-M-h}, which marks a defun. However, @kbd{ESC F1} and
@kbd{ESC ?} work fine.)
is @key{ESC} in combination with @kbd{C-h}, because @kbd{@key{ESC} C-h} is
actually @kbd{C-M-h}, which marks a defun. However, @kbd{@key{ESC} @key{F1}}
and @kbd{@key{ESC} ?} work fine.)
@node Help Files
@section Help Files
......
......@@ -127,9 +127,9 @@ in the region, moving the affected lines as a ``rigid'' unit.
If called with no argument, the command activates a transient mode for
adjusting the indentation of the affected lines interactively. While
this transient mode is active, typing @key{LEFT} or @key{RIGHT}
this transient mode is active, typing @key{left} or @key{right}
indents leftward and rightward, respectively, by one space. You can
also type @kbd{S-@key{LEFT}} or @kbd{S-@key{RIGHT}} to indent leftward
also type @kbd{S-@key{left}} or @kbd{S-@key{right}} to indent leftward
or rightward to the next tab stop (@pxref{Tab Stops}). Typing any
other key disables the transient mode, and resumes normal editing.
......
......@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ erase just one character or only whitespace.
@table @kbd
@item @key{DEL}
@itemx @key{Backspace}
@itemx @key{BACKSPACE}
Delete the previous character, or the text in the region if it is
active (@code{delete-backward-char}).
......@@ -841,7 +841,7 @@ shifting the original text to the right.
@findex rectangle-mark-mode
@cindex rectangular region
The command @kbd{C-x SPC} (@code{rectangle-mark-mode}) makes a
The command @kbd{C-x @key{SPC}} (@code{rectangle-mark-mode}) makes a
@dfn{rectangular region}. It is a new feature introduced in GNU Emacs
24.4, and most commands now are still unaware of it, but kill and yank
(@pxref{Killing}) do work on the rectangle.
......@@ -879,9 +879,9 @@ behavior, set the variable @code{cua-delete-selection} to @code{nil}.
@cindex rectangle highlighting
CUA mode provides enhanced rectangle support with visible
rectangle highlighting. Use @kbd{C-RET} to start a rectangle,
rectangle highlighting. Use @kbd{C-@key{RET}} to start a rectangle,
extend it using the movement commands, and cut or copy it using
@kbd{C-x} or @kbd{C-c}. @kbd{RET} moves the cursor to the next
@kbd{C-x} or @kbd{C-c}. @key{RET} moves the cursor to the next
(clockwise) corner of the rectangle, so you can easily expand it in
any direction. Normal text you type is inserted to the left or right
of each line in the rectangle (on the same side as the cursor).
......@@ -896,7 +896,7 @@ and yank commands, e.g., @kbd{C-1 C-c} copies the region into register
@cindex global mark
CUA mode also has a global mark feature which allows easy moving and
copying of text between buffers. Use @kbd{C-S-SPC} to toggle the
copying of text between buffers. Use @kbd{C-S-@key{SPC}} to toggle the
global mark on and off. When the global mark is on, all text that you
kill or copy is automatically inserted at the global mark, and text
you type is inserted at the global mark rather than at the current
......
......@@ -506,7 +506,7 @@ keyboard input that you would use to invoke the macro---@kbd{C-x e} or
@findex kmacro-step-edit-macro
@kindex C-x C-k SPC
You can interactively replay and edit the last keyboard
macro, one command at a time, by typing @kbd{C-x C-k SPC}
macro, one command at a time, by typing @kbd{C-x C-k @key{SPC}}
(@code{kmacro-step-edit-macro}). Unless you quit the macro using
@kbd{q} or @kbd{C-g}, the edited macro replaces the last macro on the
macro ring.
......@@ -518,15 +518,15 @@ options. These actions are available:
@itemize @bullet{}
@item
@kbd{SPC} and @kbd{y} execute the current command, and advance to the
@key{SPC} and @kbd{y} execute the current command, and advance to the
next command in the keyboard macro.
@item
@kbd{n}, @kbd{d}, and @kbd{DEL} skip and delete the current command.
@kbd{n}, @kbd{d}, and @key{DEL} skip and delete the current command.
@item
@kbd{f} skips the current command in this execution of the keyboard
macro, but doesn't delete it from the macro.
@item
@kbd{@key{TAB}} executes the current command, as well as all similar
@key{TAB} executes the current command, as well as all similar
commands immediately following the current command; for example, @key{TAB}
may be used to insert a sequence of characters (corresponding to a
sequence of @code{self-insert-command} commands).
......@@ -542,31 +542,31 @@ with the edited macro.
@kbd{q} and @kbd{C-g} cancels the step-editing of the keyboard macro;
discarding any changes made to the keyboard macro.
@item
@kbd{i KEY... C-j} reads and executes a series of key sequences (not
@kbd{i @var{key}@dots{} C-j} reads and executes a series of key sequences (not
including the final @kbd{C-j}), and inserts them before the current
command in the keyboard macro, without advancing over the current
command.
@item
@kbd{I KEY...} reads one key sequence, executes it, and inserts it
@kbd{I @var{key}@dots{}} reads one key sequence, executes it, and inserts it
before the current command in the keyboard macro, without advancing
over the current command.
@item
@kbd{r KEY... C-j} reads and executes a series of key sequences (not
@kbd{r @var{key}@dots{} C-j} reads and executes a series of key sequences (not
including the final @kbd{C-j}), and replaces the current command in
the keyboard macro with them, advancing over the inserted key
sequences.
@item
@kbd{R KEY...} reads one key sequence, executes it, and replaces the
@kbd{R @var{key}@dots{}} reads one key sequence, executes it, and replaces the
current command in the keyboard macro with that key sequence,
advancing over the inserted key sequence.
@item
@kbd{a KEY... C-j} executes the current command, then reads and
@kbd{a @var{key}@dots{} C-j} executes the current command, then reads and
executes a series of key sequences (not including the final
@kbd{C-j}), and inserts them after the current command in the keyboard
macro; it then advances over the current command and the inserted key
sequences.
@item
@kbd{A KEY... C-j} executes the rest of the commands in the keyboard
@kbd{A @var{key}@dots{} C-j} executes the rest of the commands in the keyboard
macro, then reads and executes a series of key sequences (not
including the final @kbd{C-j}), and appends them at the end of the
keyboard macro; it then terminates the step-editing and replaces the
......
......@@ -357,12 +357,12 @@ While in the completion list buffer, this chooses the completion at
point (@code{choose-completion}).
@findex next-completion
@item @key{Right}
@item @key{right}
While in the completion list buffer, this moves point to the following
completion alternative (@code{next-completion}).