Commit d8186297 authored by Luc Teirlinck's avatar Luc Teirlinck

(Text Comparison): assoc-string also matches elements of alists that

are strings instead of conses.
(Formatting Strings): Standardize Texinfo usage.  Update index entries.
parent 41b867ea
2004-01-26 Luc Teirlinck <teirllm@auburn.edu>
* strings.texi (Text Comparison): assoc-string also matches
elements of alists that are strings instead of conses.
(Formatting Strings): Standardize Texinfo usage. Update index
entries.
2004-01-20 Luc Teirlinck <teirllm@auburn.edu>
* lists.texi (Sets And Lists): Add delete-dups.
......
......@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ null strings are always omitted from the result. Thus:
@end example
The result is not @samp{("" "two" "words" "")}, which would rarely be
useful. If you need such a result, use an explict value for
useful. If you need such a result, use an explicit value for
@var{separators}:
@example
......@@ -530,6 +530,9 @@ portion) is less.
This function works like @code{assoc}, except that @var{key} must be a
string, and comparison is done using @code{compare-strings}. If
@var{case-fold} is non-@code{nil}, it ignores case differences.
Unlike @code{assoc}, this function can also match elements of the alist
that are strings rather than conses. In particular, @var{alist} can
be a list of strings rather than an actual alist.
@xref{Association Lists}.
@end defun
......@@ -795,21 +798,20 @@ operation} error.
@end group
@end example
@cindex numeric prefix
@cindex field width
@cindex padding
All the specification characters allow an optional ``width'', which
is a digit-string between the @samp{%} and the character. If the
printed representation of the object contains fewer characters than
this width, then it is padded. The padding is on the left if the
prefix is positive (or starts with zero) and on the right if the
prefix is negative. The padding character is normally a space, but if
width is positive (or starts with zero) and on the right if the
width is negative. The padding character is normally a space, but if
the width starts with a zero, zeros are used for padding. Some of
these conventions are ignored for specification characters for which
they do not make sense. That is, %s, %S and %c accept a width
starting with 0, but still pad with @emph{spaces} on the left. Also,
%% accepts a width, but ignores it. Here are some examples of
padding:
they do not make sense. That is, @samp{%s}, @samp{%S} and @samp{%c}
accept a width starting with 0, but still pad with @emph{spaces} on
the left. Also, @samp{%%} accepts a width, but ignores it. Here are
some examples of padding:
@example
(format "%06d is padded on the left with zeros" 123)
......@@ -849,27 +851,31 @@ not truncated. In the third case, the padding is on the right.
@end group
@end smallexample
@cindex precision in format specifications
All the specification characters allow an optional ``precision''
before the character (after the width, if present). The precision is
a decimal-point @samp{.} followed by a digit-string. For the
floating-point specifications (%e, %f, %g), the precision specifies
how many decimal places to show; if zero, the decimal-point itself is
also omitted. For %s and %S, the precision truncates the string to
the given width, so @code{"%.3s"} shows only the first three
characters of the representation for @var{object}. Precision is
ignored for other specification characters.
Immediately after the % and before the optional width and precision,
you can put certain ``flag'' characters.
A space @var{" "} inserts a space for positive numbers (otherwise
floating-point specifications (@samp{%e}, @samp{%f}, @samp{%g}), the
precision specifies how many decimal places to show; if zero, the
decimal-point itself is also omitted. For @samp{%s} and @samp{%S},
the precision truncates the string to the given width, so
@samp{%.3s} shows only the first three characters of the
representation for @var{object}. Precision is ignored for other
specification characters.
@cindex flags in format specifications
Immediately after the @samp{%} and before the optional width and
precision, you can put certain ``flag'' characters.
A space character inserts a space for positive numbers (otherwise
nothing is inserted for positive numbers). This flag is ignored
except for %d, %e, %f, %g.
except for @samp{%d}, @samp{%e}, @samp{%f}, @samp{%g}.
The flag @var{"#"} indicates ``alternate form''. For %o it ensures
that the result begins with a 0. For %x and %X the result is prefixed
with ``0x'' or ``0X''. For %e, %f, and %g a decimal point is always
shown even if the precision is zero.
The flag @samp{#} indicates ``alternate form''. For @samp{%o} it
ensures that the result begins with a 0. For @samp{%x} and @samp{%X}
the result is prefixed with @samp{0x} or @samp{0X}. For @samp{%e},
@samp{%f}, and @samp{%g} a decimal point is always shown even if the
precision is zero.
@node Case Conversion
@comment node-name, next, previous, up
......@@ -1035,7 +1041,7 @@ and @samp{A} are related by case-conversion, they should have the same
canonical equivalent character (which should be either @samp{a} for both
of them, or @samp{A} for both of them).
The extra table @var{equivalences} is a map that cyclicly permutes
The extra table @var{equivalences} is a map that cyclically permutes
each equivalence class (of characters with the same canonical
equivalent). (For ordinary @acronym{ASCII}, this would map @samp{a} into
@samp{A} and @samp{A} into @samp{a}, and likewise for each set of
......
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