Commit d8ad4d3f authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Merge from emacs-24; up to 2012-11-24T16:58:43Z!cyd@gnu.org

parents b7f3003f e1d51545
2012-12-06 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* configure.ac: Handle info/ files with or without ".info" extension.
2012-11-30 Paul Eggert <eggert@cs.ucla.edu>
Merge from gnulib for 'inline' (Bug#13040), incorporating:
......
......@@ -830,7 +830,7 @@ if test "$MAKEINFO" = "no"; then
MAKEINFO=makeinfo
if test "x${with_makeinfo}" = "xno"; then
HAVE_MAKEINFO=no
elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs; then
elif test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs && test ! -e $srcdir/info/emacs.info; then
AC_MSG_ERROR( [You do not seem to have makeinfo >= 4.7, and your
source tree does not seem to have pre-built manuals in the `info' directory.
Either install a suitable version of makeinfo, or re-run configure
......
2012-12-06 Juanma Barranquero <lekktu@gmail.com>
* vc1-xtra.texi (General VC Options): Remove obsolete reference
to `vc-path'.
2012-12-03 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* custom.texi (Init Rebinding): kbd is now a function (Bug#13052).
......
......@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ abbrev definitions, both global and local.
When Abbrev mode is enabled, an abbrev expands whenever it is
present in the buffer just before point and you type a self-inserting
whitespace or punctuation character (@key{SPC}, comma, etc.@:). More
whitespace or punctuation character (@key{SPC}, comma, etc.). More
precisely, any character that is not a word constituent expands an
abbrev, and any word-constituent character can be part of an abbrev.
The most common way to use an abbrev is to insert it and then insert a
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ explained in the corresponding sections.
@menu
* Auto Reverting the Buffer Menu:: Auto Revert of the Buffer Menu.
* Auto Reverting Dired:: Auto Revert of Dired buffers.
* Supporting additional buffers:: How to add more Auto Revert support.
* Supporting additional buffers:: How to add more Auto Revert support.
@end menu
@node Auto Reverting the Buffer Menu
......@@ -66,9 +66,9 @@ operating systems. It may not work satisfactorily on some other
systems.
Dired buffers only auto-revert when the file list of the buffer's main
directory changes (e.g. when a new file is added). They do not
directory changes (e.g., when a new file is added). They do not
auto-revert when information about a particular file changes
(e.g. when the size changes) or when inserted subdirectories change.
(e.g., when the size changes) or when inserted subdirectories change.
To be sure that @emph{all} listed information is up to date, you have
to manually revert using @kbd{g}, @emph{even} if auto-reverting is
enabled in the Dired buffer. Sometimes, you might get the impression
......
......@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ just like digits. Case is ignored.
of a character, using the minibuffer. If you enter a name, the
command provides completion (@pxref{Completion}). If you enter a
code-point, it should be as a hexadecimal number (the convention for
Unicode), or a number with a specified radix, e.g.@: @code{#o23072}
Unicode), or a number with a specified radix, e.g., @code{#o23072}
(octal); @xref{Integer Basics,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference
Manual}. The command then inserts the corresponding character into
the buffer. For example, both of the following insert the infinity
......@@ -385,7 +385,7 @@ On some text terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
properly. @xref{DEL Does Not Delete}, if you encounter this problem.
The @key{delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e. the
``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e., the
character under the cursor. If point was at the end of a line, this
joins the following line onto this one. Like @kbd{@key{DEL}}, it
deletes the text in the region if the region is active (@pxref{Mark}).
......
......@@ -44,8 +44,8 @@ variables}---variables that can have a different value in each buffer.
by the largest buffer position representable by @dfn{Emacs integers}.
This is because Emacs tracks buffer positions using that data type.
For typical 64-bit machines, this maximum buffer size is @math{2^61 -
2} bytes, or about 2 EiB. For typical 32-bit machines, the maximum is
usually @math{2^29 - 2} bytes, or about 512 MiB. Buffer sizes are
2} bytes, or about 2 EiB@. For typical 32-bit machines, the maximum is
usually @math{2^29 - 2} bytes, or about 512 MiB@. Buffer sizes are
also limited by the amount of memory in the system.
@menu
......@@ -614,7 +614,7 @@ names (all but one of them).
@vindex uniquify-buffer-name-style
Other methods work by adding parts of each file's directory to the
buffer name. To select one, load the library @file{uniquify} (e.g.
buffer name. To select one, load the library @file{uniquify} (e.g.,
using @code{(require 'uniquify)}), and customize the variable
@code{uniquify-buffer-name-style} (@pxref{Easy Customization}).
......
......@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ or previous error message for a different source file.
@findex next-error-follow-minor-mode
You can type @kbd{C-c C-f} to toggle Next Error Follow mode. In
this minor mode, ordinary cursor motion in the compilation buffer
automatically updates the source buffer, i.e.@: moving the cursor over
automatically updates the source buffer, i.e., moving the cursor over
an error message causes the locus of that error to be displayed.
The features of Compilation mode are also available in a minor mode
......@@ -324,7 +324,7 @@ nohup @var{command}; sleep 1
@ifnottex
On the MS-DOS ``operating system'', asynchronous subprocesses are
not supported, so @kbd{M-x compile} runs the compilation command
synchronously (i.e.@: you must wait until the command finishes before
synchronously (i.e., you must wait until the command finishes before
you can do anything else in Emacs). @xref{MS-DOS}.
@end ifnottex
......@@ -589,7 +589,7 @@ to recompile and restart the program.
@findex gud-tooltip-mode
@vindex gud-tooltip-echo-area
GUD Tooltip mode is a global minor mode that adds tooltip support to
GUD. To toggle this mode, type @kbd{M-x gud-tooltip-mode}. It is
GUD@. To toggle this mode, type @kbd{M-x gud-tooltip-mode}. It is
disabled by default. If enabled, you can move the mouse cursor over a
variable, a function, or a macro (collectively called
@dfn{identifiers}) to show their values in tooltips
......@@ -625,7 +625,7 @@ Set a breakpoint on the source line that point is on.
@kbd{C-x @key{SPC}} (@code{gud-break}), when called in a source
buffer, sets a debugger breakpoint on the current source line. This
command is available only after starting GUD. If you call it in a
command is available only after starting GUD@. If you call it in a
buffer that is not associated with any debugger subprocess, it signals
a error.
......@@ -756,7 +756,7 @@ This key is available only in the GUD interaction buffer.
that makes sense.
Because @key{TAB} serves as a completion command, you can't use it to
enter a tab as input to the program you are debugging with GDB.
enter a tab as input to the program you are debugging with GDB@.
Instead, type @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to enter a tab.
@node GUD Customization
......@@ -774,7 +774,7 @@ Instead, type @kbd{C-q @key{TAB}} to enter a tab.
you are using DBX; @code{sdb-mode-hook}, if you are using SDB;
@code{xdb-mode-hook}, if you are using XDB; @code{perldb-mode-hook},
for Perl debugging mode; @code{pdb-mode-hook}, for PDB;
@code{jdb-mode-hook}, for JDB. @xref{Hooks}.
@code{jdb-mode-hook}, for JDB@. @xref{Hooks}.
The @code{gud-def} Lisp macro (@pxref{Defining Macros,,, elisp, the
Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}) provides a convenient way to define an
......
......@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ knows about. These are: @code{holiday-general-holidays},
@code{holiday-bahai-holidays}, @code{holiday-christian-holidays},
@code{holiday-hebrew-holidays}, @code{holiday-islamic-holidays},
@code{holiday-oriental-holidays}, and @code{holiday-other-holidays}.
The names should be self-explanatory; e.g.@: @code{holiday-solar-holidays}
The names should be self-explanatory; e.g., @code{holiday-solar-holidays}
lists sun- and moon-related holidays.
You can customize these lists of holidays to your own needs, deleting or
......@@ -628,7 +628,7 @@ of the diary entries, or add items.
variables @code{diary-comment-start} and @code{diary-comment-end} to
strings that delimit comments. The fancy display does not print
comments. You might want to put meta-data for the use of other packages
(e.g.@: the appointment package,
(e.g., the appointment package,
@iftex
@pxref{Appointments,,,emacs, the Emacs Manual})
@end iftex
......
......@@ -1551,7 +1551,7 @@ diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
2445---Internet Calendaring and Scheduling Core Object Specification
(iCalendar)'' (as well as the earlier vCalendar format).
@c Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e. non-recurring) events, but
@c Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e., non-recurring) events, but
@c (at present) may not work correctly (if at all) for recurring events.
@c Exporting of diary files into iCalendar files should work correctly
@c for most diary entries. This feature is a work in progress, so the
......
......@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ Emacs tries @env{TEMP}, then @env{TMPDIR}, then @env{TMP}, and finally
This specifies the current time zone and possibly also daylight
saving time information. On MS-DOS, if @env{TZ} is not set in the
environment when Emacs starts, Emacs defines a default value as
appropriate for the country code returned by DOS. On MS-Windows, Emacs
appropriate for the country code returned by DOS@. On MS-Windows, Emacs
does not use @env{TZ} at all.
@item USER
The user's login name. See also @env{LOGNAME}. On MS-DOS, this
......@@ -747,7 +747,7 @@ Use @var{font} as the default font.
When passing a font name to Emacs on the command line, you may need to
``quote'' it, by enclosing it in quotation marks, if it contains
characters that the shell treats specially (e.g.@: spaces). For
characters that the shell treats specially (e.g., spaces). For
example:
@smallexample
......@@ -839,7 +839,7 @@ otherwise use an appropriate standard mode for @var{num} colors.
Depending on your terminal's capabilities, Emacs might be able to turn
on a color mode for 8, 16, 88, or 256 as the value of @var{num}. If
there is no mode that supports @var{num} colors, Emacs acts as if
@var{num} were 0, i.e.@: it uses the terminal's default color support
@var{num} were 0, i.e., it uses the terminal's default color support
mode.
@end table
If @var{mode} is omitted, it defaults to @var{ansi8}.
......@@ -1070,7 +1070,7 @@ it.
By default, Emacs uses an icon containing the Emacs logo. On
desktop environments such as Gnome, this icon is also displayed in
other contexts, e.g.@: when switching into an Emacs frame. The
other contexts, e.g., when switching into an Emacs frame. The
@samp{-nbi} or @samp{--no-bitmap-icon} option tells Emacs to let the
window manager choose what sort of icon to use---usually just a small
rectangle containing the frame's title.
......
......@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ holding down the @key{Ctrl} key while pressing @kbd{a}; we will refer
to this as @kbd{C-a} for short. Similarly @kbd{Meta-a}, or @kbd{M-a}
for short, is entered by holding down the @key{Alt} key and pressing
@kbd{a}. Modifier keys can also be applied to non-alphanumerical
characters, e.g. @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{left}}.
characters, e.g., @kbd{C-@key{F1}} or @kbd{M-@key{left}}.
@cindex @key{ESC} replacing @key{Meta} key
You can also type Meta characters using two-character sequences
......
......@@ -610,10 +610,10 @@ always considered safe.
@vindex custom-enabled-themes
Setting or saving Custom themes actually works by customizing the
variable @code{custom-enabled-themes}. The value of this variable is
a list of Custom theme names (as Lisp symbols, e.g.@: @code{tango}).
a list of Custom theme names (as Lisp symbols, e.g., @code{tango}).
Instead of using the @file{*Custom Themes*} buffer to set
@code{custom-enabled-themes}, you can customize the variable using the
usual customization interface, e.g.@: with @kbd{M-x customize-option}.
usual customization interface, e.g., with @kbd{M-x customize-option}.
Note that Custom themes are not allowed to set
@code{custom-enabled-themes} themselves.
......@@ -2329,7 +2329,7 @@ Here a full file name is used, so no searching is done.
@cindex loading Lisp libraries automatically
@cindex autoload Lisp libraries
Tell Emacs to find the definition for the function @code{myfunction}
by loading a Lisp library named @file{mypackage} (i.e.@: a file
by loading a Lisp library named @file{mypackage} (i.e., a file
@file{mypackage.elc} or @file{mypackage.el}):
@example
......@@ -2496,7 +2496,7 @@ editor customizations even if you are running as the super user.
More precisely, Emacs first determines which user's init file to use.
It gets your user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID.
@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID@.
If that user name matches the real user-ID, then Emacs uses @env{HOME};
otherwise, it looks up the home directory corresponding to that user
name in the system's data base of users.
......
......@@ -968,7 +968,7 @@ is the second argument. The output of the @command{diff} program is
shown in a buffer using Diff mode (@pxref{Comparing Files}).
If the region is active, the default for the file read using the
minibuffer is the file at the mark (i.e.@: the ordinary Emacs mark,
minibuffer is the file at the mark (i.e., the ordinary Emacs mark,
not a Dired mark; @pxref{Setting Mark}). Otherwise, if the file at
point has a backup file (@pxref{Backup}), that is the default.
......
......@@ -249,14 +249,14 @@ variables @code{scroll-up-aggressively} and
position of point after scrolling. The value of
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either @code{nil} (the
default), or a floating point number @var{f} between 0 and 1. The
latter means that when point goes below the bottom window edge (i.e.@:
latter means that when point goes below the bottom window edge (i.e.,
scrolling forward), Emacs scrolls the window so that point is @var{f}
parts of the window height from the bottom window edge. Thus, larger
@var{f} means more aggressive scrolling: more new text is brought into
view. The default value, @code{nil}, is equivalent to 0.5.
Likewise, @code{scroll-down-aggressively} is used when point goes
above the bottom window edge (i.e.@: scrolling backward). The value
above the bottom window edge (i.e., scrolling backward). The value
specifies how far point should be from the top margin of the window
after scrolling. Thus, as with @code{scroll-up-aggressively}, a
larger value is more aggressive.
......@@ -1089,7 +1089,7 @@ buffer text, so blank lines at the end of the buffer stand out because
they lack this image. To enable this feature, set the buffer-local
variable @code{indicate-empty-lines} to a non-@code{nil} value. You
can enable or disable this feature for all new buffers by setting the
default value of this variable, e.g.@: @code{(setq-default
default value of this variable, e.g., @code{(setq-default
indicate-empty-lines t)}.
@cindex Whitespace mode
......@@ -1258,7 +1258,7 @@ line looks like this:
Here @var{hh} and @var{mm} are the hour and minute, followed always by
@samp{am} or @samp{pm}. @var{l.ll} is the average number, collected
for the last few minutes, of processes in the whole system that were
either running or ready to run (i.e.@: were waiting for an available
either running or ready to run (i.e., were waiting for an available
processor). (Some fields may be missing if your operating system
cannot support them.) If you prefer time display in 24-hour format,
set the variable @code{display-time-24hr-format} to @code{t}.
......@@ -1369,7 +1369,7 @@ as octal escape sequences instead of caret escape sequences.
Some non-@acronym{ASCII} characters have the same appearance as an
@acronym{ASCII} space or hyphen (minus) character. Such characters
can cause problems if they are entered into a buffer without your
realization, e.g.@: by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
realization, e.g., by yanking; for instance, source code compilers
typically do not treat non-@acronym{ASCII} spaces as whitespace
characters. To deal with this problem, Emacs displays such characters
specially: it displays @code{U+00A0} (no-break space) with the
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -186,12 +186,12 @@ haven't made a choice. All differences start in the default-A state
which one alternative is ``preferred'' (see below).
When you select a difference, its state changes from default-A or
default-B to plain A or B. Thus, the selected difference never has
default-B to plain A or B@. Thus, the selected difference never has
state default-A or default-B, and these states are never displayed in
the mode line.
The command @kbd{d a} chooses default-A as the default state, and @kbd{d
b} chooses default-B. This chosen default applies to all differences
b} chooses default-B@. This chosen default applies to all differences
that you have never selected and for which no alternative is preferred.
If you are moving through the merge sequentially, the differences you
haven't selected are those following the selected one. Thus, while
......@@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ While this example shows C preprocessor conditionals delimiting the two
alternative versions, you can specify the strings to use by setting
the variable @code{emerge-combine-versions-template} to a string of your
choice. In the string, @samp{%a} says where to put version A, and
@samp{%b} says where to put version B. The default setting, which
@samp{%b} says where to put version B@. The default setting, which
produces the results shown above, looks like this:
@example
......
......@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ directory into the minibuffer as the initial contents. You can
inhibit this insertion by changing the variable
@code{insert-default-directory} to @code{nil} (@pxref{Minibuffer
File}). Regardless, Emacs always assumes that any relative file name
is relative to the default directory, e.g. entering a file name
is relative to the default directory, e.g., entering a file name
without a directory specifies a file in the default directory.
@findex cd
......@@ -773,7 +773,7 @@ spurious, just use @kbd{p} to tell Emacs to go ahead anyway.
multiple names, Emacs does not prevent two users from editing it
simultaneously under different names.
A lock file cannot be written in some circumstances, e.g. if Emacs
A lock file cannot be written in some circumstances, e.g., if Emacs
lacks the system permissions or the system does not support symbolic
links. In these cases, Emacs can still detect the collision when you
try to save a file, by checking the file's last-modification date. If
......@@ -1948,7 +1948,7 @@ can use ImageMagick to render a wide variety of images. The variable
@code{imagemagick-enabled-types} lists the image types that Emacs may
render using ImageMagick; each element in the list should be an
internal ImageMagick name for an image type, as a symbol or an
equivalent string (e.g.@: @code{BMP} for @file{.bmp} images). To
equivalent string (e.g., @code{BMP} for @file{.bmp} images). To
enable ImageMagick for all possible image types, change
@code{imagemagick-enabled-types} to @code{t}. The variable
@code{imagemagick-types-inhibit} lists the image types which should
......
......@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ Move to the beginning of the next statement
@item C-c C-p
Move to the beginning of the previous statement
(@code{fortran-previous-statement}/@code{f90-previous-statement}).
If there is no previous statement (i.e. if called from the first
If there is no previous statement (i.e., if called from the first
statement in the buffer), move to the start of the buffer.
@kindex C-c C-e @r{(F90 mode)}
......
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
@chapter Frames and Graphical Displays
@cindex frames
When Emacs is started on a graphical display, e.g.@: on the X Window
When Emacs is started on a graphical display, e.g., on the X Window
System, it occupies a graphical system-level ``window''. In this
manual, we call this a @dfn{frame}, reserving the word ``window'' for
the part of the frame used for displaying a buffer. A frame initially
......@@ -246,8 +246,8 @@ Select the text you drag across, in the form of whole lines.
@vindex mouse-highlight
Some Emacs buffers include @dfn{buttons}, or @dfn{hyperlinks}:
pieces of text that perform some action (e.g.@: following a reference)
when activated (e.g.@: by clicking on them). Usually, a button's text
pieces of text that perform some action (e.g., following a reference)
when activated (e.g., by clicking on them). Usually, a button's text
is visually highlighted: it is underlined, or a box is drawn around
it. If you move the mouse over a button, the shape of the mouse
cursor changes and the button lights up. If you change the variable
......@@ -631,7 +631,7 @@ Monospace Bold Italic 12
@cindex X Logical Font Description
The third way to specify a font is to use an @dfn{XLFD} (@dfn{X
Logical Font Description}). This is the traditional method for
specifying fonts under X. Each XLFD consists of fourteen words or
specifying fonts under X@. Each XLFD consists of fourteen words or
numbers, separated by dashes, like this:
@example
......@@ -644,7 +644,7 @@ characters (including none), and @samp{?} matches any single
character. However, matching is implementation-dependent, and can be
inaccurate when wildcards match dashes in a long name. For reliable
results, supply all 14 dashes and use wildcards only within a field.
Case is insignificant in an XLFD. The syntax for an XLFD is as
Case is insignificant in an XLFD@. The syntax for an XLFD is as
follows:
@example
......@@ -659,7 +659,7 @@ The entries have the following meanings:
@item maker
The name of the font manufacturer.
@item family
The name of the font family (e.g.@: @samp{courier}).
The name of the font family (e.g., @samp{courier}).
@item weight
The font weight---normally either @samp{bold}, @samp{medium} or
@samp{light}. Some font names support other values.
......@@ -1067,7 +1067,7 @@ attributes of the tooltip text are specified by the @code{tooltip}
face, and by X resources (@pxref{X Resources}).
@dfn{GUD tooltips} are special tooltips that show the values of
variables when debugging a program with GUD. @xref{Debugger
variables when debugging a program with GUD@. @xref{Debugger
Operation}.
@node Mouse Avoidance
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ our web site, @uref{http://www.gnu.org}. For software tasks and other
ways to contribute, see @uref{http://www.gnu.org/help}.
@end quotation
@unnumberedsec What's GNU? Gnu's Not Unix!
@unnumberedsec What's GNU@? Gnu's Not Unix!
GNU, which stands for Gnu's Not Unix, is the name for the complete
Unix-compatible software system which I am writing so that I can give it
......@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ systems, approved for use in a residential area, and not in need of
sophisticated cooling or power.
I have found very many programmers eager to contribute part-time work for
GNU. For most projects, such part-time distributed work would be very hard
GNU@. For most projects, such part-time distributed work would be very hard
to coordinate; the independently-written parts would not work together.
But for the particular task of replacing Unix, this problem is absent. A
complete Unix system contains hundreds of utility programs, each of which
......@@ -262,7 +262,7 @@ and you must charge for the program to support that.''
@end quotation
There are various forms of free or very cheap publicity that can be used to
inform numbers of computer users about something like GNU. But it may be
inform numbers of computer users about something like GNU@. But it may be
true that one can reach more microcomputer users with advertising. If this
is really so, a business which advertises the service of copying and
mailing GNU for a fee ought to be successful enough to pay for its
......@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ advertising pay for it.
On the other hand, if many people get GNU from their friends, and such
companies don't succeed, this will show that advertising was not really
necessary to spread GNU. Why is it that free market advocates don't
necessary to spread GNU@. Why is it that free market advocates don't
want to let the free market decide this?@footnote{The Free Software
Foundation raises most of its funds from a distribution service,
although it is a charity rather than a company. If @emph{no one}
......
......@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ leftward).
This command can be used to remove all indentation from the lines in
the region, by invoking it with a large negative argument,
e.g. @kbd{C-u -1000 C-x @key{TAB}}.
e.g., @kbd{C-u -1000 C-x @key{TAB}}.
@end table
@node Tab Stops
......
......@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ killing many different types of syntactic units.
@cindex deletion
Most commands which erase text from the buffer save it in the kill
ring. These are known as @dfn{kill} commands, and their names
normally contain the word @samp{kill} (e.g. @code{kill-line}). The
normally contain the word @samp{kill} (e.g., @code{kill-line}). The
kill ring stores several recent kills, not just the last one, so
killing is a very safe operation: you don't have to worry much about
losing text that you previously killed. The kill ring is shared by
......@@ -284,7 +284,7 @@ position, if you wish, with @kbd{C-u C-@key{SPC}} (@pxref{Mark Ring}).
With a plain prefix argument (@kbd{C-u C-y}), the command instead
leaves the cursor in front of the inserted text, and sets the mark at
the end. Using any other prefix argument specifies an earlier kill;
e.g. @kbd{C-u 4 C-y} reinserts the fourth most recent kill.
e.g., @kbd{C-u 4 C-y} reinserts the fourth most recent kill.
@xref{Earlier Kills}.
On graphical displays, @kbd{C-y} first checks if another application
......@@ -535,13 +535,13 @@ or ``copy'' commands.
Under X, whenever the region is active (@pxref{Mark}), the text in
the region is saved in the primary selection. This applies regardless
of whether the region was made by dragging or clicking the mouse
(@pxref{Mouse Commands}), or by keyboard commands (e.g. by typing
(@pxref{Mouse Commands}), or by keyboard commands (e.g., by typing
@kbd{C-@key{SPC}} and moving point; @pxref{Setting Mark}).
@vindex select-active-regions
If you change the variable @code{select-active-regions} to
@code{only}, Emacs saves only temporarily active regions to the
primary selection, i.e. those made with the mouse or with shift
primary selection, i.e., those made with the mouse or with shift
selection (@pxref{Shift Selection}). If you change
@code{select-active-regions} to @code{nil}, Emacs avoids saving active
regions to the primary selection entirely.
......@@ -841,8 +841,8 @@ has no effect for @kbd{C-x} and @kbd{C-c} (@pxref{Using Region}).
To enter an Emacs command like @kbd{C-x C-f} while the mark is
active, use one of the following methods: either hold @kbd{Shift}
together with the prefix key, e.g. @kbd{S-C-x C-f}, or quickly type
the prefix key twice, e.g. @kbd{C-x C-x C-f}.
together with the prefix key, e.g., @kbd{S-C-x C-f}, or quickly type
the prefix key twice, e.g., @kbd{C-x C-x C-f}.
To disable the overriding of standard Emacs binding by CUA mode,
while retaining the other features of CUA mode described below, set
......@@ -862,7 +862,7 @@ of each line in the rectangle (on the same side as the cursor).
With CUA you can easily copy text and rectangles into and out of
registers by providing a one-digit numeric prefix to the kill, copy,
and yank commands, e.g. @kbd{C-1 C-c} copies the region into register
and yank commands, e.g., @kbd{C-1 C-c} copies the region into register
@code{1}, and @kbd{C-2 C-v} yanks the contents of register @code{2}.
@cindex global mark
......@@ -875,7 +875,7 @@ position.
For example, to copy words from various buffers into a word list in
a given buffer, set the global mark in the target buffer, then
navigate to each of the words you want in the list, mark it (e.g. with
navigate to each of the words you want in the list, mark it (e.g., with
@kbd{S-M-f}), copy it to the list with @kbd{C-c} or @kbd{M-w}, and
insert a newline after the word in the target list by pressing
@key{RET}.
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ versions of a source file, storing information such as the creation
time of each version, who made it, and a description of what was
changed.
The Emacs version control interface is called @dfn{VC}. VC commands
The Emacs version control interface is called @dfn{VC}@. VC commands
work with several different version control systems; currently, it
supports GNU Arch, Bazaar, CVS, Git, Mercurial, Monotone, RCS,
SCCS/CSSC, and Subversion. Of these, the GNU project distributes CVS,
......@@ -73,8 +73,8 @@ provides a uniform interface for common operations in many version
control operations.
Some uncommon or intricate version control operations, such as
altering repository settings, are not supported in VC. You should
perform such tasks outside Emacs, e.g.@: via the command line.
altering repository settings, are not supported in VC@. You should
perform such tasks outside Emacs, e.g., via the command line.
This section provides a general overview of version control, and
describes the version control systems that VC supports. You can skip
......@@ -128,13 +128,13 @@ which it refers to as @dfn{back ends}:
@item
SCCS was the first version control system ever built, and was long ago
superseded by more advanced ones. VC compensates for certain features
missing in SCCS (e.g.@: tag names for releases) by implementing them
missing in SCCS (e.g., tag names for releases) by implementing them
itself. Other VC features, such as multiple branches, are simply
unavailable. Since SCCS is non-free, we recommend avoiding it.
@cindex CSSC
@item
CSSC is a free replacement for SCCS. You should use CSSC only if, for
CSSC is a free replacement for SCCS@. You should use CSSC only if, for
some reason, you cannot use a more recent and better-designed version
control system.
......@@ -455,7 +455,7 @@ and don't persist across sessions.
@node VC With A Merging VCS
@subsubsection Basic Version Control with Merging
On a merging-based version control system (i.e.@: most modern ones;
On a merging-based version control system (i.e., most modern ones;
@pxref{VCS Merging}), @kbd{C-x v v} does the following:
@itemize @bullet
......@@ -467,7 +467,7 @@ files and ``modified'' files; @pxref{Registering}.)
@item
If none of the files in the VC fileset are registered with a version
control system, register the VC fileset, i.e.@: place it under version
control system, register the VC fileset, i.e., place it under version
control. @xref{Registering}. If Emacs cannot find a system to
register under, it prompts for a repository type, creates a new
repository, and registers the VC fileset with it.
......@@ -568,13 +568,13 @@ and Emacs fails to detect the correct one.
Otherwise, if using CVS or RCS, you can specify a revision ID.
If the fileset is modified (or locked), this makes Emacs commit with
that revision ID. You can create a new branch by supplying an
that revision ID@. You can create a new branch by supplying an
appropriate revision ID (@pxref{Branches}).
If the fileset is unmodified (and unlocked), this checks the specified
revision into the working tree. You can also specify a revision on
another branch by giving its revision or branch ID (@pxref{Switching
Branches}). An empty argument (i.e.@: @kbd{C-u C-x v v @key{RET}})
Branches}). An empty argument (i.e., @kbd{C-u C-x v v @key{RET}})
checks out the latest (``head'') revision on the current branch.
This signals an error on a decentralized version control system.
......@@ -759,7 +759,7 @@ comparison again, generating a new diff.
prompts for two revision IDs (@pxref{VCS Concepts}), and displays a
diff between those versions of the fileset. This will not work
reliably for multi-file VC filesets, if the version control system is
file-based rather than changeset-based (e.g.@: CVS), since then
file-based rather than changeset-based (e.g., CVS), since then
revision IDs for different files would not be related in any
meaningful way.
......@@ -783,7 +783,7 @@ Ediff session. @xref{Top,, Ediff, ediff, The Ediff Manual}.
@findex vc-root-diff
@kindex C-x v D
@kbd{C-x v D} (@code{vc-root-diff}) is similar to @kbd{C-x v =}, but
it displays the changes in the entire current working tree (i.e.@: the
it displays the changes in the entire current working tree (i.e., the
working tree containing the current VC fileset). If you invoke this
command from a Dired buffer, it applies to the working tree containing
the directory.
......@@ -795,7 +795,7 @@ from the first non-@code{nil} value amongst the variables
@code{vc-@var{backend}-diff-switches}, @code{vc-diff-switches}, and
@code{diff-switches} (@pxref{Comparing Files}), in that order. Here,
@var{backend} stands for the relevant version control system,
e.g.@: @code{bzr} for Bazaar. Since @code{nil} means to check the
e.g., @code{bzr} for Bazaar. Since @code{nil} means to check the
next variable in the sequence, either of the first two may use the
value @code{t} to mean no switches at all. Most of the
@code{vc-@var{backend}-diff-switches} variables default to @code{nil},
......@@ -835,12 +835,12 @@ view diffs, or view log entries:
@table @kbd
@item p
Annotate the previous revision, i.e.@: the revision before the one
Annotate the previous revision, i.e., the revision before the one
currently annotated. A numeric prefix argument is a repeat count, so
@kbd{C-u 10 p} would take you back 10 revisions.
@item n
Annotate the next revision, i.e.@: the revision after the one
Annotate the next revision, i.e., the revision after the one
currently annotated. A numeric prefix argument is a repeat count.
@item j
......@@ -986,7 +986,7 @@ earlier revision. This shows the changes to all files made in that
revision.
@item @key{RET}
In a compact-style log buffer (e.g.@: the one created by @kbd{C-x v
In a compact-style log buffer (e.g., the one created by @kbd{C-x v
L}), toggle between showing and hiding the full log entry for the
revision at point.
@end table
......@@ -1064,7 +1064,7 @@ the version control system which the VC Directory buffer should use.
@pindex cvs
@cindex CVS directory mode
In addition to the VC Directory buffer, Emacs has a similar facility
called PCL-CVS which is specialized for CVS. @xref{Top, , About
called PCL-CVS which is specialized for CVS@. @xref{Top, , About
PCL-CVS, pcl-cvs, PCL-CVS --- The Emacs Front-End to CVS}.
@end ifnottex
......@@ -1080,7 +1080,7 @@ PCL-CVS, pcl-cvs, PCL-CVS --- The Emacs Front-End to CVS}.
and their version control statuses. It lists files in the current
directory (the one specified when you called @kbd{C-x v d}) and its
subdirectories, but only those with a ``noteworthy'' status. Files
that are up-to-date (i.e.@: the same as in the repository) are
that are up-to-date (i.e., the same as in the repository) are
omitted. If all the files in a subdirectory are up-to-date, the
subdirectory is not listed either. As an exception, if a file has
become up-to-date as a direct result of a VC command, it is listed.
......@@ -1131,7 +1131,7 @@ updates. If you change the variable @code{vc-stay-local} or
@code{vc-cvs-stay-local} (for CVS) to @code{nil} (@pxref{CVS
Options}), then Emacs avoids contacting a remote repository when
generating the VC Directory buffer (it will still contact it when
necessary, e.g.@: when doing a commit). This may be desirable if you