Commit dc103cdc authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

Use @kbd instead of @key for mouse commands throughout.

parent ab8fc9aa
......@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ yanking using the mouse.
@kindex Mouse-1
@kindex Mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-3
@table @key
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-1
Move point to where you click (@code{mouse-set-point}).
......@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ ring; on a second click, kill it (@code{mouse-save-then-kill}).
@findex mouse-set-point
The most basic mouse command is @code{mouse-set-point}, which is
called by clicking with the left mouse button, @key{Mouse-1}, in the
called by clicking with the left mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-1}, in the
text area of a window. This moves point to the position where you
clicked.
......@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ position.
@findex mouse-set-region
@vindex mouse-drag-copy-region
Holding down @key{Mouse-1} and ``dragging'' the mouse over a stretch
Holding down @kbd{Mouse-1} and ``dragging'' the mouse over a stretch
of text activates the region around that text
(@code{mouse-set-region}). @xref{Mark}. Emacs places the mark where
you started holding down the mouse button, and point where you release
......@@ -133,7 +133,7 @@ on how far away from the window edge the mouse has gone; the variable
@findex mouse-yank-at-click
@vindex mouse-yank-at-point
Clicking with the middle mouse button, @key{Mouse-2}, moves point to
Clicking with the middle mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-2}, moves point to
the position where you clicked and performs a yank
(@code{mouse-yank-at-click}). @xref{Yanking}. If you change the
variable @code{mouse-yank-at-point} to a non-@code{nil} value,
......@@ -143,35 +143,35 @@ occurs at the existing point. This variable also affects yanking the
primary and secondary selections (@pxref{Cut/Paste Other App}).
@findex mouse-save-then-kill
Clicking with the right mouse button, @key{Mouse-3}, runs the
Clicking with the right mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-3}, runs the
command @code{mouse-save-then-kill}. This performs several actions
depending on where you click and the status of the region:
@itemize @bullet
@item
If no region is active, clicking @key{Mouse-3} activates the region,
If no region is active, clicking @kbd{Mouse-3} activates the region,
placing the mark where point was and point at the clicked position.
In addition, the text in the region is copied to the kill ring.
@item
If a region is active, clicking @key{Mouse-3} adjusts the nearer end
If a region is active, clicking @kbd{Mouse-3} adjusts the nearer end
of the region by moving it to the clicked position. The adjusted
region's text is copied to the kill ring; if the text in the original
region was already on the kill ring, it replaces it there.
@item
If you originally specified the region using a double or triple
@key{Mouse-1}, so that the region is defined to consist of entire
words or lines, then adjusting the region with @key{Mouse-3} also
@kbd{Mouse-1}, so that the region is defined to consist of entire
words or lines, then adjusting the region with @kbd{Mouse-3} also
proceeds by entire words or lines.
@item
If you use @key{Mouse-3} a second time consecutively, at the same
If you use @kbd{Mouse-3} a second time consecutively, at the same
place, that kills the region already selected. Thus, the simplest way
to kill text with the mouse is to click @key{Mouse-1} at one end, then
click @key{Mouse-3} twice at the other end. To copy the text into the
kill ring without deleting it from the buffer, press @key{Mouse-3}
just once---or just drag across the text with @key{Mouse-1}. Then you
to kill text with the mouse is to click @kbd{Mouse-1} at one end, then
click @kbd{Mouse-3} twice at the other end. To copy the text into the
kill ring without deleting it from the buffer, press @kbd{Mouse-3}
just once---or just drag across the text with @kbd{Mouse-1}. Then you
can copy it elsewhere by yanking it.
@end itemize
......@@ -202,7 +202,7 @@ always kill the region if one exists.
time. Emacs activates the region around the selected text, which is
also copied to the kill ring.
@table @key
@table @kbd
@item Double-Mouse-1
Select the text around the word which you click on.
......@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ systems such as Microsoft Windows (@pxref{Clipboard}).
Under X, whenever you select some text in Emacs by dragging or
clicking the mouse (@pxref{Mouse Commands}), it is also saved in the
primary selection. You can then @dfn{paste} that text into any other
X application, usually by clicking @key{Mouse-2} in that application.
X application, usually by clicking @kbd{Mouse-2} in that application.
Unlike the Emacs kill ring (@pxref{Kill Ring}), the primary selection
has no ``memory'': each time you save something in the primary
selection, either in Emacs or in another X application, the previous
......@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ inefficient, Emacs only does it if the text is shorter than the value
of @code{x-cut-buffer-max} (the default is 20000 characters).
You can yank the primary selection into Emacs using the usual yank
commands, such as @kbd{C-y} (@code{yank}) and @key{Mouse-2}
commands, such as @kbd{C-y} (@code{yank}) and @kbd{Mouse-2}
(@code{mouse-yank-at-click}). These commands actually check the
primary selection before referring to the kill ring; if no primary
selection is available, the kill ring contents are used. To prevent
......@@ -299,7 +299,7 @@ second similar facility known as the @dfn{secondary selection}.
Nowadays, few X applications make use of the secondary selection, but
you can access it using the following Emacs commands:
@table @key
@table @kbd
@findex mouse-set-secondary
@kindex M-Drag-Mouse-1
@item M-Drag-Mouse-1
......@@ -324,8 +324,8 @@ Set one endpoint for the @dfn{secondary selection}
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the position clicked and
the other at the position specified with @kbd{M-Mouse-1}
(@code{mouse-secondary-save-then-kill}). This also puts the selected
text in the kill ring. A second @kbd{M-@key{Mouse-3}} at the same
place kills the secondary selection just made.
text in the kill ring. A second @kbd{M-Mouse-3} at the same place
kills the secondary selection just made.
@findex mouse-yank-secondary
@kindex M-Mouse-2
......@@ -334,10 +334,10 @@ Insert the secondary selection where you click, placing point at the
end of the yanked text (@code{mouse-yank-secondary}).
@end table
Double or triple clicking of @key{M-Mouse-1} operates on words and
lines, much like @key{Mouse-1}.
Double or triple clicking of @kbd{M-Mouse-1} operates on words and
lines, much like @kbd{Mouse-1}.
If @code{mouse-yank-at-point} is non-@code{nil}, @key{M-Mouse-2} yanks
If @code{mouse-yank-at-point} is non-@code{nil}, @kbd{M-Mouse-2} yanks
at point. Then it does not matter precisely where you click, or even
which of the frame's windows you click on. @xref{Mouse Commands}.
......@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ that error message (@pxref{Compilation}). Doing it on a completion in
the @samp{*Completions*} buffer chooses that completion
(@pxref{Completion}).
Although clicking @key{Mouse-1} on a button usually activates that
Although clicking @kbd{Mouse-1} on a button usually activates that
button, if you hold the mouse button down for a short period of time
before releasing it (specifically, for more than 450 milliseconds),
then Emacs moves point where you clicked instead. This behavior
......@@ -408,10 +408,10 @@ its usual behavior of setting the region, even if you drag from or
onto a button.
@vindex mouse-1-click-in-non-selected-windows
Normally, clicking @key{Mouse-1} on a button activates the button
Normally, clicking @kbd{Mouse-1} on a button activates the button
even if it is in a nonselected window. If you change the variable
@code{mouse-1-click-in-non-selected-windows} to @code{nil}, clicking
@key{Mouse-1} on a button in an un-selected window moves point to the
@kbd{Mouse-1} on a button in an un-selected window moves point to the
clicked position and selects that window, without activating the
button.
......@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ mouse-1-click-follows-link @key{RET}} for more details.
Several mouse clicks with the @key{CTRL} and @key{SHIFT} modifiers
bring up menus.
@table @key
@table @kbd
@item C-Mouse-1
@kindex C-Mouse-1
This menu is for selecting a buffer.
......@@ -846,20 +846,20 @@ overlapping frames with text starting at the left margin.}
When Emacs is compiled with GTK+ support on the X window system, or
in operating systems such as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS, you can use
the scroll bar as you do in other graphical applications. If you
click @key{Mouse-1} on the scroll bar's up and down buttons, that
scrolls the window by one line at a time. Clicking @key{Mouse-1}
click @kbd{Mouse-1} on the scroll bar's up and down buttons, that
scrolls the window by one line at a time. Clicking @kbd{Mouse-1}
above or below the scroll bar's inner box scrolls the window by nearly
the entire height of the window, like @kbd{M-v} and @kbd{C-v}
respectively (@pxref{Moving Point}). Dragging the inner box with
@key{Mouse-1} scrolls the window continuously.
@kbd{Mouse-1} scrolls the window continuously.
If Emacs is compiled without GTK+ support on the X window system,
the scroll bar behaves differently. The scroll bar's inner box is
drawn to represent the portion of the buffer currently displayed, with
the entire height of the scroll bar representing the entire length of
the buffer. @key{Mouse-1} anywhere on the scroll bar scrolls forward
like @kbd{C-v}, and @key{Mouse-3} scrolls backward like @kbd{M-v}.
Clicking @key{Mouse-2} in the scroll bar lets you move or drag the
the buffer. @kbd{Mouse-1} anywhere on the scroll bar scrolls forward
like @kbd{C-v}, and @kbd{Mouse-3} scrolls backward like @kbd{M-v}.
Clicking @kbd{Mouse-2} in the scroll bar lets you move or drag the
inner box up and down.
You can also click @kbd{C-Mouse-2} in the scroll bar to split a
......
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