Commit dfec8297 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor cleanups.

(Comment Commands): Mention momentary Transient Mark mode.
(Matching): Be more specific about customizing show-paren-mode.
(Info Lookup): Don't list the modes that support C-h S.
Just say what it does in an unsupported mode.
(Man Page): Delete excessive info on customizing woman.
(Motion in C): Don't mention c-for/backward-into-nomenclature.
parent 3f7ba267
......@@ -259,8 +259,8 @@ defun. This is the easiest way to get ready to kill the defun in
order to move it to a different place in the file. If you use the
command while point is between defuns, it uses the following defun.
Successive uses of @kbd{C-M-h}, or using it in Transient Mark mode
when the mark is active, includes an additional defun in the region
each time.
when the mark is active, extends the end of the region to include one
more defun each time.
In C mode, @kbd{C-M-h} runs the function @code{c-mark-function},
which is almost the same as @code{mark-defun}; the difference is that
......@@ -296,9 +296,9 @@ name. You can also add the buffer's index to the menu bar by calling
@code{imenu-add-menubar-index}. If you want to have this menu bar
item available for all buffers in a certain major mode, you can do
this by adding @code{imenu-add-menubar-index} to its mode hook. But
if you have done that, you will have to wait each time you visit a
file in that mode, while Emacs finds all the definitions in that
buffer.
if you have done that, you will have to wait a little while each time
you visit a file in that mode, while Emacs finds all the definitions
in that buffer.
@vindex imenu-auto-rescan
When you change the contents of a buffer, if you add or delete
......@@ -374,8 +374,6 @@ usual conventions of the language you are editing.
Adjust indentation of current line.
@item C-j
Equivalent to @key{RET} followed by @key{TAB} (@code{newline-and-indent}).
@item @key{LINEFEED}
This key, if the keyboard has it, is another way to enter @kbd{C-j}.
@end table
@kindex TAB @r{(programming modes)}
......@@ -400,8 +398,8 @@ the characters around it.
@kindex C-j
@findex newline-and-indent
When entering lines of new code, use @kbd{C-j}
(@code{newline-and-indent}), which is equivalent to a @key{RET}
followed by a @key{TAB}. @kbd{C-j} at the end of a line creates a
(@code{newline-and-indent}), which is equivalent to @key{RET}
followed by @key{TAB}. @kbd{C-j} at the end of a line creates a
blank line and then gives it the appropriate indentation.
@key{TAB} indents a line that starts within a parenthetical grouping
......@@ -412,7 +410,7 @@ behavior is convenient in cases where you have overridden the standard
result of @key{TAB} because you find it unaesthetic for a particular
line.
By default, an open-parenthesis, open-brace or other opening
In some modes, an open-parenthesis, open-brace or other opening
delimiter at the left margin is assumed by Emacs (including the
indentation routines) to be the start of a function. This speeds up
indentation commands. If you will be editing text which contains
......@@ -422,7 +420,7 @@ functions, even inside strings or comments, you must set
Paren}, for more information on this.
Normally, lines are indented with tabs and spaces. If you want Emacs
to use spaces only, see @ref{Just Spaces}.
to use spaces only, set @code{indent-tabs-mode} (@pref{Just Spaces}).
@node Multi-line Indent
@subsection Indenting Several Lines
......@@ -587,8 +585,8 @@ typing @key{C-M-q} at the start of a function definition.
@kindex C-c . @r{(C mode)}
@findex c-set-style
To choose a style for the current buffer, use the command @kbd{C-c
.}. Specify a style name as an argument (case is not significant).
To choose a style for the current buffer, use the command @w{@kbd{C-c
.}}. Specify a style name as an argument (case is not significant).
This command affects the current buffer only, and it affects only
future invocations of the indentation commands; it does not reindent
the code already in the buffer. To reindent the whole buffer in the
......@@ -740,7 +738,7 @@ that @kbd{C-M-f} would move to. @kbd{C-M-@@} takes arguments like
the mark at the beginning of the previous balanced expression. The
alias @kbd{C-M-@key{SPC}} is equivalent to @kbd{C-M-@@}. When you
repeat this command, or use it in Transient Mark mode when the mark is
active, it extends the region by one sexp each time.
active, it extends the end of the region by one sexp each time.
In languages that use infix operators, such as C, it is not possible
to recognize all balanced expressions as such because there can be
......@@ -791,9 +789,7 @@ parenthetical groupings, skipping blithely over any amount of text
that doesn't include meaningful parentheses (symbols, strings, etc.).
@kindex C-M-u
@kindex C-M-d
@findex backward-up-list
@findex down-list
@kbd{C-M-n} and @kbd{C-M-p} try to stay at the same level in the
parenthesis structure. To move @emph{up} one (or @var{n}) levels, use
@kbd{C-M-u} (@code{backward-up-list}). @kbd{C-M-u} moves backward up
......@@ -801,6 +797,8 @@ past one unmatched opening delimiter. A positive argument serves as a
repeat count; a negative argument reverses the direction of motion, so
that the command moves forward and up one or more levels.
@kindex C-M-d
@findex down-list
To move @emph{down} in the parenthesis structure, use @kbd{C-M-d}
(@code{down-list}). In Lisp mode, where @samp{(} is the only opening
delimiter, this is nearly the same as searching for a @samp{(}. An
......@@ -852,11 +850,9 @@ highlighted. (There is no need to highlight the opening delimiter in
that case, because the cursor appears on top of that character.) Use
the command @kbd{M-x show-paren-mode} to enable or disable this mode.
By default, @code{show-paren-mode} uses colors to highlight the
parentheses. However, if your display doesn't support colors, you can
customize the faces @code{show-paren-match-face} and
@code{show-paren-mismatch-face} to use other attributes, such as bold or
underline. @xref{Face Customization}.
Show Paren mode uses the faces @code{show-paren-match} and
@code{show-paren-mismatch} to highlight parentheses; you can customize
them to control how highlighting looks. @xref{Face Customization}.
@node Comments
@section Manipulating Comments
......@@ -911,11 +907,11 @@ The new comment begins with the string Emacs thinks comments should
start with (the value of @code{comment-start}; see below). Point is
after that string, so you can insert the text of the comment right
away. If the major mode has specified a string to terminate comments,
@kbd{M-;} inserts that too, to keep the syntax valid.
@kbd{M-;} inserts that after point, to keep the syntax valid.
If the text of the line extends past the comment column, then the
comment start string is indented to a suitable boundary (usually, at
least one space is inserted).
If the text of the line extends past the comment column, this
command indents the comment start string to a suitable boundary
(usually, at least one space is inserted).
You can also use @kbd{M-;} to align an existing comment. If a line
already contains the comment-start string, @kbd{M-;} reindents it to
......@@ -943,7 +939,8 @@ removes comment delimiters on each line of the region. (If every line
is a comment, it removes comment delimiters from each; otherwise, it
adds comment delimiters to each.) If you are not using Transient Mark
mode, then you should use the commands @code{comment-region} and
@code{uncomment-region} to do these jobs (@pxref{Multi-Line Comments}).
@code{uncomment-region} to do these jobs (@pxref{Multi-Line Comments}),
or else enable Transient Mark mode momentarily (@pxref{Momentary Mark}).
A prefix argument used in these circumstances specifies how many
comment delimiters to add or how many to delete.
......@@ -964,8 +961,8 @@ and by not changing the indentation of a triple-semicolon comment at all.
(1+ x)) ; This line adds one.
@end example
For C-like buffers, you can configure the exact effect of @kbd{M-;}
more flexibly than for most buffers by setting the user options
For C-like modes, you can configure the exact effect of @kbd{M-;}
more flexibly than for most buffers by setting the variables
@code{c-indent-comment-alist} and
@code{c-indent-comments-syntactically-p}. For example, on a line
ending in a closing brace, @kbd{M-;} puts the comment one space after
......@@ -992,7 +989,7 @@ in just this fashion.
@kindex C-c C-c (C mode)
@findex comment-region
To turn existing lines into comment lines, use the @kbd{M-x
comment-region} command (or type @kbd{C-c C-c} in C-like buffers). It
comment-region} command (or type @kbd{C-c C-c} in C-like modes). It
adds comment delimiters to the lines that start in the region, thus
commenting them out. With a negative argument, it does the
opposite---it deletes comment delimiters from the lines in the region.
......@@ -1103,29 +1100,31 @@ use in your program.
@findex info-lookup-symbol
@findex info-lookup-file
@kindex C-h S
For C, Lisp, and other languages that have documentation in Info,
you can use @kbd{C-h S} (@code{info-lookup-symbol}) to view the Info
documentation for a symbol used in the program. You specify the
symbol with the minibuffer; the default is the symbol appearing in the
buffer at point. For example, in C mode this looks for the symbol in
the C Library Manual.
For many major modes, that apply to languages that have
documentation in Info, you can use @kbd{C-h S}
(@code{info-lookup-symbol}) to view the Info documentation for a
symbol used in the program. You specify the symbol with the
minibuffer; the default is the symbol appearing in the buffer at
point. For example, in C mode this looks for the symbol in the C
Library Manual. The command only works if the appropriate manual's
Info files are installed.
The major mode determines where to look for documentation for the
symbol---which Info files to look in, and which indices to search.
You can also use @kbd{M-x info-lookup-file} to look for documentation
for a file name.
This feature currently supports the modes AWK, Autoconf, Bison, C,
Emacs Lisp, LaTeX, M4, Makefile, Octave, Perl, Scheme, and Texinfo,
provided you have installed the relevant Info files, which are
typically available with the appropriate GNU package.
If you use @kbd{C-h S} in a major mode that does not support it,
it asks you to specify the ``symbol help mode''. You should enter
a command such as @code{c-mode} that would select a major
mode which @kbd{C-h S} does support.
@node Man Page
@subsection Man Page Lookup
@cindex manual page
On Unix, the main form of on-line documentation was the @dfn{manual
page} or @dfn{man page}. In the GNU operating system, we hope to
page} or @dfn{man page}. In the GNU operating system, we aim to
replace man pages with better-organized manuals that you can browse
with Info (@pxref{Misc Help}). This process is not finished, so it is
still useful to read manual pages.
......@@ -1151,8 +1150,8 @@ a man page from a specific section, type
when @kbd{M-x manual-entry} prompts for the topic. For example, to
read the man page for the C library function @code{chmod} (as opposed
to a command of the same name), type @kbd{M-x manual-entry @key{RET}
chmod(2) @key{RET}} (@code{chmod} is a system call, so it is in
section @samp{2}).
chmod(2) @key{RET}}. (@code{chmod} is a system call, so it is in
section @samp{2}.)
@vindex Man-switches
If you do not specify a section, the results depend on how the
......@@ -1203,42 +1202,6 @@ several manual pages by the same name exist in different sections, it
pops up a window with possible candidates asking you to choose one of
them.
@vindex woman-manpath
By default, @kbd{M-x woman} looks for manual pages in the
directories specified in the @code{MANPATH} environment variable. (If
@code{MANPATH} is not set, @code{woman} uses a suitable default value,
which can be customized.) More precisely, @code{woman} looks for
subdirectories that match the shell wildcard pattern @file{man*} in each one
of these directories, and tries to find the manual pages in those
subdirectories. When first invoked, @kbd{M-x woman} converts the
value of @code{MANPATH} to a list of directory names and stores that
list in the @code{woman-manpath} variable. Changing the value of this
variable is another way to control the list of directories used.
@vindex woman-path
You can also augment the list of directories searched by
@code{woman} by setting the value of the @code{woman-path} variable.
This variable should hold a list of specific directories which
@code{woman} should search, in addition to those in
@code{woman-manpath}. Unlike @code{woman-manpath}, the directories in
@code{woman-path} are searched for the manual pages, not for
@file{man*} subdirectories.
@findex woman-find-file
Occasionally, you might need to display manual pages that are not in
any of the directories listed by @code{woman-manpath} and
@code{woman-path}. The @kbd{M-x woman-find-file} command prompts for a
name of a manual page file, with completion, and then formats and
displays that file like @kbd{M-x woman} does.
@vindex woman-dired-keys
The first time you invoke @kbd{M-x woman}, it defines the Dired
@kbd{W} key to run the @code{woman-find-file} command on the current
line's file. You can disable this by setting the variable
@code{woman-dired-keys} to @code{nil}. @xref{Dired}. In addition,
the Tar-mode @kbd{w} key is define to invoke @code{woman-find-file} on
the current line's archive member.
For more information about setting up and using @kbd{M-x woman}, see
@ref{Top, WoMan, Browse UN*X Manual Pages WithOut Man, woman, The WoMan
Manual}.
......@@ -1325,8 +1288,8 @@ Hide all blocks @var{n} levels below this block
Non-@code{nil} says that @kbd{hs-hide-all} should hide comments too.
@item hs-isearch-open
Specifies what kind of hidden blocks to open in Isearch mode.
The value should be one of these four symbols:
Specifies what kind of hidden blocks incremental search should make
visible. The value should be one of these four symbols:
@table @code
@item code
......@@ -1533,24 +1496,6 @@ moves by sentences instead of statements.
Move point to the end of the innermost C statement or sentence; like
@kbd{M-a} except that it moves in the other direction
(@code{c-end-of-statement}).
@item M-x c-backward-into-nomenclature
@findex c-backward-into-nomenclature
Move point backward to beginning of a C++ nomenclature section or
word. With prefix argument @var{n}, move @var{n} times. If @var{n}
is negative, move forward. C++ nomenclature means a symbol name in
the style of NamingSymbolsWithMixedCaseAndNoUnderlines; each capital
letter begins a section or word. Rather than this command, you might
well prefer the newer ``Subword Mode'', which does the same thing
better. @xref{Other C Commands}.
In the GNU project, we recommend using underscores to separate words
within an identifier in C or C++, rather than using case distinctions.
@item M-x c-forward-into-nomenclature
@findex c-forward-into-nomenclature
Move point forward to end of a C++ nomenclature section or word.
With prefix argument @var{n}, move @var{n} times.
@end table
@node Electric C
......@@ -1661,6 +1606,9 @@ the flag @samp{/w} on the mode line after the mode name
(e.g. @samp{C/law}). You can even use @kbd{M-x c-subword-mode} in
non-CC Mode buffers.
In the GNU project, we recommend using underscores to separate words
within an identifier in C or C++, rather than using case distinctions.
@item M-x c-context-line-break
@findex c-context-line-break
This command inserts a line break and indents the new line in a manner
......
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