Commit e45e90b3 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris
Browse files

Use a DATE variable with the publication date, and update it.

Fix antinews menu description.
Update VERSION to match elisp.texi.
Update the detailed node listing to match elisp.texi.
parent 220d9aa6
......@@ -25,8 +25,9 @@
@c Version of the manual and of Emacs.
@c Please remember to update the edition number in README as well.
@set VERSION 2.9
@set VERSION 3.0
@set EMACSVER 23.1.50
@set DATE July 2009
@dircategory Emacs
@direntry
......@@ -89,7 +90,7 @@ developing GNU and promoting software freedom.''
@title GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual
@subtitle Volume 1
@subtitle For Emacs Version @value{EMACSVER}
@subtitle Revision @value{VERSION}, June 2007
@subtitle Revision @value{VERSION}, @value{DATE}
@author by Bil Lewis, Dan LaLiberte, Richard Stallman
@author and the GNU Manual Group
......@@ -180,7 +181,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
Appendices
* Antinews:: Info for users downgrading to Emacs 21.
* Antinews:: Info for users downgrading to Emacs 22.
* GNU Free Documentation License:: The license for this documentation
* GPL:: Conditions for copying and changing GNU Emacs.
* Tips:: Advice and coding conventions for Emacs Lisp.
......@@ -296,13 +297,15 @@ Editing Types
* Buffer Type:: The basic object of editing.
* Marker Type:: A position in a buffer.
* Window Type:: What makes buffers visible.
* Frame Type:: Windows subdivide frames.
* Frame Type:: Windows subdivide frames.
* Terminal Type:: A terminal device displays frames.
* Window Configuration Type:: Recording the way a frame is subdivided.
* Frame Configuration Type:: Recording the status of all frames.
* Process Type:: A process running on the underlying OS.
* Process Type:: A subprocess of Emacs running on the underlying OS.
* Stream Type:: Receive or send characters.
* Keymap Type:: What function a keystroke invokes.
* Overlay Type:: How an overlay is represented.
* Font Type:: Fonts for displaying text.
Numbers
......@@ -441,8 +444,9 @@ Variables
* Setting Variables:: Storing new values in variables.
* Variable Scoping:: How Lisp chooses among local and global values.
* Buffer-Local Variables:: Variable values in effect only in one buffer.
* Future Local Variables:: New kinds of local values we might add some day.
* File Local Variables:: Handling local variable lists in files.
* Directory Local Variables:: Local variables common to all files in a directory.
* Frame-Local Variables:: Frame-local bindings for variables.
* Variable Aliases:: Variables that are aliases for other variables.
* Variables with Restricted Values:: Non-constant variables whose value can
@emph{not} be an arbitrary Lisp object.
......@@ -650,7 +654,9 @@ Completion
* Completion Commands:: Minibuffer commands that do completion.
* High-Level Completion:: Convenient special cases of completion
(reading buffer name, file name, etc.)
* Reading File Names:: Using completion to read file names.
* Reading File Names:: Using completion to read file names and
shell commands.
* Completion Styles:: Specifying rules for performing completion.
* Programmed Completion:: Finding the completions for a given file name.
Command Loop
......@@ -658,6 +664,7 @@ Command Loop
* Command Overview:: How the command loop reads commands.
* Defining Commands:: Specifying how a function should read arguments.
* Interactive Call:: Calling a command, so that it will read arguments.
* Distinguish Interactive:: Making a command distinguish interactive calls.
* Command Loop Info:: Variables set by the command loop for you to examine.
* Adjusting Point:: Adjustment of point after a command.
* Input Events:: What input looks like when you read it.
......@@ -693,7 +700,8 @@ Input Events
* Misc Events:: Other events the system can generate.
* Event Examples:: Examples of the lists for mouse events.
* Classifying Events:: Finding the modifier keys in an event symbol.
* Accessing Events:: Functions to extract info from events.
* Accessing Mouse:: Functions to extract info from mouse events.
* Accessing Scroll:: Functions to get info from scroll bar events.
* Strings of Events:: Special considerations for putting
keyboard character events in a string.
......@@ -917,6 +925,7 @@ Buffers
* Killing Buffers:: Buffers exist until explicitly killed.
* Indirect Buffers:: An indirect buffer shares text with some
other buffer.
* Swapping Text:: Swapping text between two buffers.
* Buffer Gap:: The gap in the buffer.
Windows
......@@ -930,9 +939,11 @@ Windows
* Displaying Buffers:: Higher-level functions for displaying a buffer
and choosing a window for it.
* Choosing Window:: How to choose a window for displaying a buffer.
* Dedicated Windows:: How to avoid displaying another buffer in
a specific window.
* Window Point:: Each window has its own location of point.
* Window Start:: The display-start position controls which text
is on-screen in the window.
* Window Start and End:: Buffer positions indicating which text is
on-screen in a window.
* Textual Scrolling:: Moving text up and down through the window.
* Vertical Scrolling:: Moving the contents up and down on the window.
* Horizontal Scrolling:: Moving the contents sideways on the window.
......@@ -941,6 +952,7 @@ Windows
* Coordinates and Windows:: Converting coordinates to windows.
* Window Tree:: The layout and sizes of all windows in a frame.
* Window Configurations:: Saving and restoring the state of the screen.
* Window Parameters:: Associating additional information with windows.
* Window Hooks:: Hooks for scrolling, window size changes,
redisplay going past a certain point,
or window configuration changes.
......@@ -948,8 +960,9 @@ Windows
Frames
* Creating Frames:: Creating additional frames.
* Multiple Terminals:: Creating frames on other displays.
* Multiple Terminals:: Displaying on several different devices.
* Frame Parameters:: Controlling frame size, position, font, etc.
* Terminal Parameters:: Parameters common for all frames on terminal.
* Frame Titles:: Automatic updating of frame titles.
* Deleting Frames:: Frames last until explicitly deleted.
* Finding All Frames:: How to examine all existing frames.
......@@ -1083,13 +1096,10 @@ Text Properties
* Format Properties:: Properties for representing formatting of text.
* Sticky Properties:: How inserted text gets properties from
neighboring text.
* Saving Properties:: Saving text properties in files, and reading
them back.
* Lazy Properties:: Computing text properties in a lazy fashion
only when text is examined.
* Clickable Text:: Using text properties to make regions of text
do something when you click on them.
* Links and Mouse-1:: How to make @key{Mouse-1} follow a link.
* Fields:: The @code{field} property defines
fields within the buffer.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
......@@ -1102,10 +1112,10 @@ Non-ASCII Characters
* Selecting a Representation:: Treating a byte sequence as unibyte or multi.
* Character Codes:: How unibyte and multibyte relate to
codes of individual characters.
* Character Properties:: Character attributes that define their
behavior and handling.
* Character Sets:: The space of possible character codes
is divided into various character sets.
* Chars and Bytes:: More information about multibyte encodings.
* Splitting Characters:: Converting a character to its byte sequence.
* Scanning Charsets:: Which character sets are used in a buffer?
* Translation of Characters:: Translation tables are used for conversion.
* Coding Systems:: Coding systems are conversions for saving files.
......@@ -1208,6 +1218,7 @@ Processes
* Output from Processes:: Collecting output from an asynchronous subprocess.
* Sentinels:: Sentinels run when process run-status changes.
* Query Before Exit:: Whether to query if exiting will kill a process.
* System Processes:: Accessing other processes running on your system.
* Transaction Queues:: Transaction-based communication with subprocesses.
* Network:: Opening network connections.
* Network Servers:: Network servers let Emacs accept net connections.
......@@ -1215,6 +1226,7 @@ Processes
* Low-Level Network:: Lower-level but more general function
to create connections and servers.
* Misc Network:: Additional relevant functions for network connections.
* Serial Ports:: Communicating with serial ports.
* Byte Packing:: Using bindat to pack and unpack binary data.
Receiving Output from Processes
......@@ -1292,13 +1304,15 @@ Faces
* Attribute Functions:: Functions to examine and set face attributes.
* Displaying Faces:: How Emacs combines the faces specified for
a character.
* Font Selection:: Finding the best available font for a face.
* Face Remapping:: Remapping faces to alternative definitions.
* Face Functions:: How to define and examine faces.
* Auto Faces:: Hook for automatic face assignment.
* Font Selection:: Finding the best available font for a face.
* Font Lookup:: Looking up the names of available fonts
and information about them.
* Fontsets:: A fontset is a collection of fonts
that handle a range of character sets.
* Low-Level Font:: Lisp representation of character display fonts.
Fringes
......
......@@ -25,8 +25,9 @@
@c Version of the manual and of Emacs.
@c Please remember to update the edition number in README as well.
@set VERSION 2.9
@set VERSION 3.0
@set EMACSVER 23.1.50
@set DATE July 2009
@dircategory Emacs
@direntry
......@@ -89,7 +90,7 @@ developing GNU and promoting software freedom.''
@title GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual
@subtitle Volume 2
@subtitle For Emacs Version @value{EMACSVER}
@subtitle Revision @value{VERSION}, June 2007
@subtitle Revision @value{VERSION}, @value{DATE}
@author by Bil Lewis, Dan LaLiberte, Richard Stallman
@author and the GNU Manual Group
......@@ -179,7 +180,7 @@ Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
Appendices
* Antinews:: Info for users downgrading to Emacs 21.
* Antinews:: Info for users downgrading to Emacs 22.
* GNU Free Documentation License:: The license for this documentation
* GPL:: Conditions for copying and changing GNU Emacs.
* Tips:: Advice and coding conventions for Emacs Lisp.
......@@ -295,13 +296,15 @@ Editing Types
* Buffer Type:: The basic object of editing.
* Marker Type:: A position in a buffer.
* Window Type:: What makes buffers visible.
* Frame Type:: Windows subdivide frames.
* Frame Type:: Windows subdivide frames.
* Terminal Type:: A terminal device displays frames.
* Window Configuration Type:: Recording the way a frame is subdivided.
* Frame Configuration Type:: Recording the status of all frames.
* Process Type:: A process running on the underlying OS.
* Process Type:: A subprocess of Emacs running on the underlying OS.
* Stream Type:: Receive or send characters.
* Keymap Type:: What function a keystroke invokes.
* Overlay Type:: How an overlay is represented.
* Font Type:: Fonts for displaying text.
Numbers
......@@ -440,8 +443,9 @@ Variables
* Setting Variables:: Storing new values in variables.
* Variable Scoping:: How Lisp chooses among local and global values.
* Buffer-Local Variables:: Variable values in effect only in one buffer.
* Future Local Variables:: New kinds of local values we might add some day.
* File Local Variables:: Handling local variable lists in files.
* Directory Local Variables:: Local variables common to all files in a directory.
* Frame-Local Variables:: Frame-local bindings for variables.
* Variable Aliases:: Variables that are aliases for other variables.
* Variables with Restricted Values:: Non-constant variables whose value can
@emph{not} be an arbitrary Lisp object.
......@@ -649,7 +653,9 @@ Completion
* Completion Commands:: Minibuffer commands that do completion.
* High-Level Completion:: Convenient special cases of completion
(reading buffer name, file name, etc.)
* Reading File Names:: Using completion to read file names.
* Reading File Names:: Using completion to read file names and
shell commands.
* Completion Styles:: Specifying rules for performing completion.
* Programmed Completion:: Finding the completions for a given file name.
Command Loop
......@@ -657,6 +663,7 @@ Command Loop
* Command Overview:: How the command loop reads commands.
* Defining Commands:: Specifying how a function should read arguments.
* Interactive Call:: Calling a command, so that it will read arguments.
* Distinguish Interactive:: Making a command distinguish interactive calls.
* Command Loop Info:: Variables set by the command loop for you to examine.
* Adjusting Point:: Adjustment of point after a command.
* Input Events:: What input looks like when you read it.
......@@ -692,7 +699,8 @@ Input Events
* Misc Events:: Other events the system can generate.
* Event Examples:: Examples of the lists for mouse events.
* Classifying Events:: Finding the modifier keys in an event symbol.
* Accessing Events:: Functions to extract info from events.
* Accessing Mouse:: Functions to extract info from mouse events.
* Accessing Scroll:: Functions to get info from scroll bar events.
* Strings of Events:: Special considerations for putting
keyboard character events in a string.
......@@ -916,6 +924,7 @@ Buffers
* Killing Buffers:: Buffers exist until explicitly killed.
* Indirect Buffers:: An indirect buffer shares text with some
other buffer.
* Swapping Text:: Swapping text between two buffers.
* Buffer Gap:: The gap in the buffer.
Windows
......@@ -929,9 +938,11 @@ Windows
* Displaying Buffers:: Higher-level functions for displaying a buffer
and choosing a window for it.
* Choosing Window:: How to choose a window for displaying a buffer.
* Dedicated Windows:: How to avoid displaying another buffer in
a specific window.
* Window Point:: Each window has its own location of point.
* Window Start:: The display-start position controls which text
is on-screen in the window.
* Window Start and End:: Buffer positions indicating which text is
on-screen in a window.
* Textual Scrolling:: Moving text up and down through the window.
* Vertical Scrolling:: Moving the contents up and down on the window.
* Horizontal Scrolling:: Moving the contents sideways on the window.
......@@ -940,6 +951,7 @@ Windows
* Coordinates and Windows:: Converting coordinates to windows.
* Window Tree:: The layout and sizes of all windows in a frame.
* Window Configurations:: Saving and restoring the state of the screen.
* Window Parameters:: Associating additional information with windows.
* Window Hooks:: Hooks for scrolling, window size changes,
redisplay going past a certain point,
or window configuration changes.
......@@ -947,8 +959,9 @@ Windows
Frames
* Creating Frames:: Creating additional frames.
* Multiple Terminals:: Creating frames on other displays.
* Multiple Terminals:: Displaying on several different devices.
* Frame Parameters:: Controlling frame size, position, font, etc.
* Terminal Parameters:: Parameters common for all frames on terminal.
* Frame Titles:: Automatic updating of frame titles.
* Deleting Frames:: Frames last until explicitly deleted.
* Finding All Frames:: How to examine all existing frames.
......@@ -1082,13 +1095,10 @@ Text Properties
* Format Properties:: Properties for representing formatting of text.
* Sticky Properties:: How inserted text gets properties from
neighboring text.
* Saving Properties:: Saving text properties in files, and reading
them back.
* Lazy Properties:: Computing text properties in a lazy fashion
only when text is examined.
* Clickable Text:: Using text properties to make regions of text
do something when you click on them.
* Links and Mouse-1:: How to make @key{Mouse-1} follow a link.
* Fields:: The @code{field} property defines
fields within the buffer.
* Not Intervals:: Why text properties do not use
......@@ -1101,10 +1111,10 @@ Non-ASCII Characters
* Selecting a Representation:: Treating a byte sequence as unibyte or multi.
* Character Codes:: How unibyte and multibyte relate to
codes of individual characters.
* Character Properties:: Character attributes that define their
behavior and handling.
* Character Sets:: The space of possible character codes
is divided into various character sets.
* Chars and Bytes:: More information about multibyte encodings.
* Splitting Characters:: Converting a character to its byte sequence.
* Scanning Charsets:: Which character sets are used in a buffer?
* Translation of Characters:: Translation tables are used for conversion.
* Coding Systems:: Coding systems are conversions for saving files.
......@@ -1207,6 +1217,7 @@ Processes
* Output from Processes:: Collecting output from an asynchronous subprocess.
* Sentinels:: Sentinels run when process run-status changes.
* Query Before Exit:: Whether to query if exiting will kill a process.
* System Processes:: Accessing other processes running on your system.
* Transaction Queues:: Transaction-based communication with subprocesses.
* Network:: Opening network connections.
* Network Servers:: Network servers let Emacs accept net connections.
......@@ -1214,6 +1225,7 @@ Processes
* Low-Level Network:: Lower-level but more general function
to create connections and servers.
* Misc Network:: Additional relevant functions for network connections.
* Serial Ports:: Communicating with serial ports.
* Byte Packing:: Using bindat to pack and unpack binary data.
Receiving Output from Processes
......@@ -1291,13 +1303,15 @@ Faces
* Attribute Functions:: Functions to examine and set face attributes.
* Displaying Faces:: How Emacs combines the faces specified for
a character.
* Font Selection:: Finding the best available font for a face.
* Face Remapping:: Remapping faces to alternative definitions.
* Face Functions:: How to define and examine faces.
* Auto Faces:: Hook for automatic face assignment.
* Font Selection:: Finding the best available font for a face.
* Font Lookup:: Looking up the names of available fonts
and information about them.
* Fontsets:: A fontset is a collection of fonts
that handle a range of character sets.
* Low-Level Font:: Lisp representation of character display fonts.
Fringes
......
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