Commit e465fdc2 authored by Gerd Moellmann's avatar Gerd Moellmann
Browse files

*** empty log message ***

parent 1172eb8d
......@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ lower-precedence keymaps; thus, if the local map gives a binding of
@cindex prompt string of keymap
Aside from bindings, a keymap can also have a string as an element.
This is called the @dfn{overall prompt string} and makes it possible to
use the keymap as a menu. @xref{Menu Keymaps}.
use the keymap as a menu. @xref{Defining Menus}.
@end table
@cindex meta characters lookup
......@@ -228,8 +228,8 @@ to @code{nil}, and does not bind any other kind of event.
@end example
If you specify @var{prompt}, that becomes the overall prompt string for
the keymap. The prompt string is useful for menu keymaps (@pxref{Menu
Keymaps}).
the keymap. The prompt string is useful for menu keymaps
(@pxref{Defining Menus}).
@end defun
@defun make-sparse-keymap &optional prompt
......@@ -475,7 +475,7 @@ as a variable instead.
If @var{prompt} is non-@code{nil}, that becomes the overall prompt
string for the keymap. The prompt string is useful for menu keymaps
(@pxref{Menu Keymaps}).
(@pxref{Defining Menus}).
@end defun
@node Active Keymaps
......@@ -1526,8 +1526,13 @@ work with the keyboard also.
A keymap is suitable for menu use if it has an @dfn{overall prompt
string}, which is a string that appears as an element of the keymap.
(@xref{Format of Keymaps}.) The string should describe the purpose of
the menu. The easiest way to construct a keymap with a prompt string is
to specify the string as an argument when you call @code{make-keymap} or
the menu's commands. Emacs displays the overall prompt string as the
menu title in some cases, depending on which toolkit is used for
displaying menus. Keyboard menus also display the overall prompt
string.
The easiest way to construct a keymap with a prompt string is to specify
the string as an argument when you call @code{make-keymap} or
@code{make-sparse-keymap} (@pxref{Creating Keymaps}).
The order of items in the menu is the same as the order of bindings in
......@@ -1872,12 +1877,13 @@ When a prefix key ending with a keyboard event (a character or function
key) has a definition that is a menu keymap, the user can use the
keyboard to choose a menu item.
Emacs displays the menu alternatives (the item strings of the bindings)
in the echo area. If they don't all fit at once, the user can type
@key{SPC} to see the next line of alternatives. Successive uses of
@key{SPC} eventually get to the end of the menu and then cycle around to
the beginning. (The variable @code{menu-prompt-more-char} specifies
which character is used for this; @key{SPC} is the default.)
Emacs displays the menu's overall prompt string followed by the
alternatives (the item strings of the bindings) in the echo area. If
the bindings don't all fit at once, the user can type @key{SPC} to see
the next line of alternatives. Successive uses of @key{SPC} eventually
get to the end of the menu and then cycle around to the beginning. (The
variable @code{menu-prompt-more-char} specifies which character is used
for this; @key{SPC} is the default.)
When the user has found the desired alternative from the menu, he or she
should type the corresponding character---the one whose binding is that
......
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