Commit e4c26271 authored by Lars Ingebrigtsen's avatar Lars Ingebrigtsen

Change all occurrences of "Mouse-[0-9]" to "mouse-[0-9]"

* doc/emacs/*.texi: Change all occurrences of "Mouse-[0-9]" to
"mouse-[0-9]".  These are case sensitive, and the keys are lower case
(bug#14554).
parent fafdfcb1
......@@ -699,10 +699,10 @@ C-b}. To customize this buffer list, use the @code{bs} Custom group
@cindex mode, MSB
@cindex MSB mode
@findex mouse-buffer-menu
@kindex C-Down-Mouse-1
@kindex C-Down-mouse-1
MSB global minor mode (``MSB'' stands for ``mouse select buffer'')
provides a different and customizable mouse buffer menu which you may
prefer. It replaces the bindings of @code{mouse-buffer-menu},
normally on @kbd{C-Down-Mouse-1} and @kbd{C-@key{F10}}, and the menu
normally on @kbd{C-Down-mouse-1} and @kbd{C-@key{F10}}, and the menu
bar buffer menu. You can customize the menu in the @code{msb} Custom
group.
......@@ -929,23 +929,23 @@ still in the right places.
@cindex fringes, for debugging
@table @asis
@item @kbd{Mouse-1} (in fringe)
@item @kbd{mouse-1} (in fringe)
Set or clear a breakpoint on that line.
@item @kbd{C-Mouse-1} (in fringe)
@item @kbd{C-mouse-1} (in fringe)
Enable or disable a breakpoint on that line.
@item @kbd{Mouse-3} (in fringe)
@item @kbd{mouse-3} (in fringe)
Continue execution to that line.
@item @kbd{C-Mouse-3} (in fringe)
@item @kbd{C-mouse-3} (in fringe)
Jump to that line.
@end table
On a graphical display, you can click @kbd{Mouse-1} in the fringe of
On a graphical display, you can click @kbd{mouse-1} in the fringe of
a source buffer, to set a breakpoint on that line (@pxref{Fringes}).
A red dot appears in the fringe, where you clicked. If a breakpoint
already exists there, the click removes it. A @kbd{C-Mouse-1} click
already exists there, the click removes it. A @kbd{C-mouse-1} click
enables or disables an existing breakpoint; a breakpoint that is
disabled, but not unset, is indicated by a gray dot.
......@@ -957,10 +957,10 @@ of the window. Disabled breakpoints are indicated with @samp{b}.
A solid arrow in the left fringe of a source buffer indicates the
line of the innermost frame where the debugged program has stopped. A
hollow arrow indicates the current execution line of a higher-level
frame. If you drag the arrow in the fringe with @kbd{Mouse-1}, that
frame. If you drag the arrow in the fringe with @kbd{mouse-1}, that
causes execution to advance to the line where you release the button.
Alternatively, you can click @kbd{Mouse-3} in the fringe to advance to
that line. You can click @kbd{C-Mouse-3} in the fringe to jump to
Alternatively, you can click @kbd{mouse-3} in the fringe to advance to
that line. You can click @kbd{C-mouse-3} in the fringe to jump to
that line without executing the intermediate lines. This command
allows you to go backwards, which can be useful for running through
code that has already executed, in order to examine its execution in
......@@ -994,15 +994,15 @@ Delete the current breakpoint (@code{gdb-delete-breakpoint}).
Visit the source line for the current breakpoint
(@code{gdb-goto-breakpoint}).
@item Mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(GDB Breakpoints buffer)}
@item mouse-2
@kindex mouse-2 @r{(GDB Breakpoints buffer)}
Visit the source line for the breakpoint you click on.
@end table
@vindex gdb-show-threads-by-default
When @code{gdb-many-windows} is non-@code{nil}, the GDB Breakpoints
buffer shares its window with the GDB Threads buffer. To switch from
one to the other click with @kbd{Mouse-1} on the relevant button in
one to the other click with @kbd{mouse-1} on the relevant button in
the header line. If @code{gdb-show-threads-by-default} is
non-@code{nil}, the GDB Threads buffer is the one shown by default.
......@@ -1014,7 +1014,7 @@ non-@code{nil}, the GDB Threads buffer is the one shown by default.
debugged program. @xref{Threads, Threads, Debugging programs with
multiple threads, gdb, The GNU debugger}. To select a thread, move
point there and press @key{RET} (@code{gdb-select-thread}), or click on
it with @kbd{Mouse-2}. This also displays the associated source
it with @kbd{mouse-2}. This also displays the associated source
buffer, and updates the contents of the other GDB buffers.
You can customize variables under @code{gdb-buffers} group to select
......@@ -1095,7 +1095,7 @@ debugger}.
arrow in the fringe. On text terminals, or when fringes are disabled,
the selected stack frame is displayed in reverse contrast. To select
a stack frame, move point in its line and type @key{RET}
(@code{gdb-frames-select}), or click @kbd{Mouse-2} on it. Doing so
(@code{gdb-frames-select}), or click @kbd{mouse-2} on it. Doing so
also updates the Locals buffer
@ifnottex
(@pxref{Other GDB Buffers}).
......@@ -1112,19 +1112,19 @@ also updates the Locals buffer
This buffer displays the values of local variables of the current
frame for simple data types (@pxref{Frame Info, Frame Info,
Information on a frame, gdb, The GNU debugger}). Press @key{RET} or
click @kbd{Mouse-2} on the value if you want to edit it.
click @kbd{mouse-2} on the value if you want to edit it.
Arrays and structures display their type only. With GDB 6.4 or later,
you can examine the value of the local variable at point by typing
@key{RET}, or with a @kbd{Mouse-2} click. With earlier versions of
GDB, use @key{RET} or @kbd{Mouse-2} on the type description
@key{RET}, or with a @kbd{mouse-2} click. With earlier versions of
GDB, use @key{RET} or @kbd{mouse-2} on the type description
(@samp{[struct/union]} or @samp{[array]}). @xref{Watch Expressions}.
@item Registers Buffer
@findex toggle-gdb-all-registers
This buffer displays the values held by the registers
(@pxref{Registers,,, gdb, The GNU debugger}). Press @key{RET} or
click @kbd{Mouse-2} on a register if you want to edit its value. With
click @kbd{mouse-2} on a register if you want to edit its value. With
GDB 6.4 or later, recently changed register values display with
@code{font-lock-warning-face}.
......@@ -1137,17 +1137,17 @@ the fringe or margin.
@item Memory Buffer
The memory buffer lets you examine sections of program memory
(@pxref{Memory, Memory, Examining memory, gdb, The GNU debugger}).
Click @kbd{Mouse-1} on the appropriate part of the header line to
Click @kbd{mouse-1} on the appropriate part of the header line to
change the starting address or number of data items that the buffer
displays. Alternatively, use @kbd{S} or @kbd{N} respectively. Click
@kbd{Mouse-3} on the header line to select the display format or unit
@kbd{mouse-3} on the header line to select the display format or unit
size for these data items.
@end table
When @code{gdb-many-windows} is non-@code{nil}, the locals buffer
shares its window with the registers buffer, just like breakpoints and
threads buffers. To switch from one to the other, click with
@kbd{Mouse-1} on the relevant button in the header line.
@kbd{mouse-1} on the relevant button in the header line.
@node Watch Expressions
@subsubsection Watch Expressions
......@@ -1171,7 +1171,7 @@ name and type otherwise. Root expressions also display the frame
address as a tooltip to help identify the frame in which they were
defined.
To expand or contract a complex data type, click @kbd{Mouse-2} or
To expand or contract a complex data type, click @kbd{mouse-2} or
press @key{SPC} on the tag to the left of the expression. Emacs asks
for confirmation before expanding the expression if its number of
immediate children exceeds the value of the variable
......@@ -1186,7 +1186,7 @@ expression in the speedbar and type @kbd{D} (@code{gdb-var-delete}).
@findex gdb-edit-value
To edit a variable with a simple data type, or a simple element of a
complex data type, move point there in the speedbar and type @key{RET}
(@code{gdb-edit-value}). Or you can click @kbd{Mouse-2} on a value to
(@code{gdb-edit-value}). Or you can click @kbd{mouse-2} on a value to
edit it. Either way, this reads the new value using the minibuffer.
@vindex gdb-show-changed-values
......
......@@ -19,8 +19,8 @@ prompts you for the month and year to be the center of the three-month
calendar. The calendar uses its own buffer, whose major mode is
Calendar mode.
@kbd{Mouse-3} in the calendar brings up a menu of operations on a
particular date; @kbd{Mouse-2} brings up a menu of commonly used
@kbd{mouse-3} in the calendar brings up a menu of operations on a
particular date; @kbd{mouse-2} brings up a menu of commonly used
calendar features that are independent of any particular date. To exit
the calendar, type @kbd{q}.
......@@ -460,7 +460,7 @@ to.
and can display them. You can add your own holidays to the default list.
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-3 Holidays
@item mouse-3 Holidays
@itemx h
Display holidays for the selected date
(@code{calendar-cursor-holidays}).
......@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@ List holidays in another window for a specified range of years.
@vindex calendar-view-holidays-initially-flag
To see if any holidays fall on a given date, position point on that
date in the calendar window and use the @kbd{h} command. Alternatively,
click on that date with @kbd{Mouse-3} and then choose @kbd{Holidays}
click on that date with @kbd{mouse-3} and then choose @kbd{Holidays}
from the menu that appears. Either way, this displays the holidays for
that date, in the echo area if they fit there, otherwise in a separate
window.
......@@ -548,7 +548,7 @@ practice}, not historical fact. For example Veteran's Day began in
times of sunrise and sunset for any date.
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-3 Sunrise/sunset
@item mouse-3 Sunrise/sunset
@itemx S
Display times of sunrise and sunset for the selected date
(@code{calendar-sunrise-sunset}).
......@@ -565,7 +565,7 @@ Display times of sunrise and sunset for the selected month.
@findex sunrise-sunset
Within the calendar, to display the @emph{local times} of sunrise and
sunset in the echo area, move point to the date you want, and type
@kbd{S}. Alternatively, click @kbd{Mouse-3} on the date, then choose
@kbd{S}. Alternatively, click @kbd{mouse-3} on the date, then choose
@samp{Sunrise/sunset} from the menu that appears. The command @kbd{M-x
sunrise-sunset} is available outside the calendar to display this
information for today's date or a specified date. To specify a date
......@@ -777,7 +777,7 @@ in various other calendar systems:
@table @kbd
@kindex p @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex calendar-print-other-dates
@item Mouse-3 Other calendars
@item mouse-3 Other calendars
@itemx p o
Display the selected date in various other calendars.
(@code{calendar-print-other-dates}).
......@@ -831,7 +831,7 @@ Display Mayan date for selected day (@code{calendar-mayan-print-date}).
appropriate command starting with @kbd{p} from the table above. The
prefix @kbd{p} is a mnemonic for ``print'', since Emacs ``prints'' the
equivalent date in the echo area. @kbd{p o} displays the
date in all forms known to Emacs. You can also use @kbd{Mouse-3} and
date in all forms known to Emacs. You can also use @kbd{mouse-3} and
then choose @kbd{Other calendars} from the menu that appears. This
displays the equivalent forms of the date in all the calendars Emacs
understands, in the form of a menu. (Choosing an alternative from
......@@ -1020,7 +1020,7 @@ it. You can also view today's events outside of Calendar mode. In the
following, key bindings refer to the Calendar buffer.
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-3 Diary
@item mouse-3 Diary
@itemx d
Display all diary entries for the selected date
(@code{diary-view-entries}).
......@@ -1058,7 +1058,7 @@ entries for that many successive days. Thus, @kbd{2 d} displays all the
entries for the selected date and for the following day.
Another way to display the diary entries for a date is to click
@kbd{Mouse-3} on the date, and then choose @kbd{Diary entries} from
@kbd{mouse-3} on the date, and then choose @kbd{Diary entries} from
the menu that appears. If the variable
@code{calendar-view-diary-initially-flag} is non-@code{nil}, creating the
calendar lists the diary entries for the current date (provided the
......
......@@ -353,8 +353,8 @@ file. @xref{Windows}.
Visit the file described on the current line, and display the buffer in
another window, but do not select that window (@code{dired-display-file}).
@item Mouse-1
@itemx Mouse-2
@item mouse-1
@itemx mouse-2
@findex dired-mouse-find-file-other-window
Visit the file whose name you clicked on
(@code{dired-mouse-find-file-other-window}). This uses another window
......
......@@ -408,7 +408,7 @@ buffers, add @code{flyspell-mode} to @code{text-mode-hook}.
@findex flyspell-auto-correct-word
@findex flyspell-correct-word-before-point
When Flyspell mode highlights a word as misspelled, you can click on
it with @kbd{Mouse-2} (@code{flyspell-correct-word}) to display a menu
it with @kbd{mouse-2} (@code{flyspell-correct-word}) to display a menu
of possible corrections and actions. In addition, @kbd{C-.} or
@kbd{@key{ESC}-@key{TAB}} (@code{flyspell-auto-correct-word}) will
propose various successive corrections for the word at point, and
......
......@@ -70,22 +70,22 @@ for doing so on MS-DOS). Menus are supported on all text terminals.
@cindex mouse buttons (what they do)
@cindex mouse, selecting text using
@kindex Mouse-1
@kindex Mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-3
@kindex mouse-1
@kindex mouse-2
@kindex mouse-3
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-1
@item mouse-1
Move point to where you click (@code{mouse-set-point}).
@item Drag-Mouse-1
@item Drag-mouse-1
Activate the region around the text selected by dragging, and put the
text in the primary selection (@code{mouse-set-region}).
@item Mouse-2
@item mouse-2
Move point to where you click, and insert the contents of the primary
selection there (@code{mouse-yank-primary}).
@item Mouse-3
@item mouse-3
If the region is active, move the nearer end of the region to the
click position; otherwise, set mark at the current value of point and
point at the click position. Save the resulting region in the kill
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ ring; on a second click, kill it (@code{mouse-save-then-kill}).
@findex mouse-set-point
The most basic mouse command is @code{mouse-set-point}, which is
invoked by clicking with the left mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-1}, in the
invoked by clicking with the left mouse button, @kbd{mouse-1}, in the
text area of a window. This moves point to the position where you
clicked. If that window was not the selected window, it becomes the
selected window.
......@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ the window and sets the cursor position.
@cindex mouse, dragging
@findex mouse-set-region
Holding down @kbd{Mouse-1} and dragging the mouse over a stretch
Holding down @kbd{mouse-1} and dragging the mouse over a stretch
of text activates the region around that text
(@code{mouse-set-region}), placing the mark where you started holding
down the mouse button, and point where you release it (@pxref{Mark}).
......@@ -132,49 +132,49 @@ on how far away from the window edge the mouse has gone; the variable
@findex mouse-yank-primary
@findex mouse-yank-at-click
Clicking with the middle mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-2}, moves point to
Clicking with the middle mouse button, @kbd{mouse-2}, moves point to
the position where you clicked and inserts the contents of the primary
selection (@code{mouse-yank-primary}). @xref{Primary Selection}.
This behavior is consistent with other X applications. Alternatively,
you can rebind @kbd{Mouse-2} to @code{mouse-yank-at-click}, which
you can rebind @kbd{mouse-2} to @code{mouse-yank-at-click}, which
performs a yank at the position you click.
@vindex mouse-yank-at-point
If you change the variable @code{mouse-yank-at-point} to a
non-@code{nil} value, @kbd{Mouse-2} does not move point; it inserts
non-@code{nil} value, @kbd{mouse-2} does not move point; it inserts
the text at point, regardless of where you clicked or even which of
the frame's windows you clicked on. This variable affects both
@code{mouse-yank-primary} and @code{mouse-yank-at-click}.
@findex mouse-save-then-kill
Clicking with the right mouse button, @kbd{Mouse-3}, runs the
Clicking with the right mouse button, @kbd{mouse-3}, runs the
command @code{mouse-save-then-kill}. This performs several actions
depending on where you click and the status of the region:
@itemize @bullet
@item
If no region is active, clicking @kbd{Mouse-3} activates the region,
If no region is active, clicking @kbd{mouse-3} activates the region,
placing the mark where point was and point at the clicked position.
@item
If a region is active, clicking @kbd{Mouse-3} adjusts the nearer end
If a region is active, clicking @kbd{mouse-3} adjusts the nearer end
of the region by moving it to the clicked position. The adjusted
region's text is copied to the kill ring; if the text in the original
region was already on the kill ring, it replaces it there.
@item
If you originally specified the region using a double or triple
@kbd{Mouse-1}, so that the region is defined to consist of entire
@kbd{mouse-1}, so that the region is defined to consist of entire
words or lines (@pxref{Word and Line Mouse}), then adjusting the
region with @kbd{Mouse-3} also proceeds by entire words or lines.
region with @kbd{mouse-3} also proceeds by entire words or lines.
@item
If you use @kbd{Mouse-3} a second time consecutively, at the same
If you use @kbd{mouse-3} a second time consecutively, at the same
place, that kills the region already selected. Thus, the simplest way
to kill text with the mouse is to click @kbd{Mouse-1} at one end, then
click @kbd{Mouse-3} twice at the other end. To copy the text into the
kill ring without deleting it from the buffer, press @kbd{Mouse-3}
just once---or just drag across the text with @kbd{Mouse-1}. Then you
to kill text with the mouse is to click @kbd{mouse-1} at one end, then
click @kbd{mouse-3} twice at the other end. To copy the text into the
kill ring without deleting it from the buffer, press @kbd{mouse-3}
just once---or just drag across the text with @kbd{mouse-1}. Then you
can copy it elsewhere by yanking it.
@end itemize
......@@ -209,12 +209,12 @@ speed is linked to how fast you move the wheel.
@node Word and Line Mouse
@section Mouse Commands for Words and Lines
These variants of @kbd{Mouse-1} select entire words or lines at a
These variants of @kbd{mouse-1} select entire words or lines at a
time. Emacs activates the region around the selected text, which is
also copied to the kill ring.
@table @kbd
@item Double-Mouse-1
@item Double-mouse-1
Select the text around the word which you click on.
Double-clicking on a character with symbol syntax (such as
......@@ -226,20 +226,20 @@ ends. Double-clicking on a character with string-delimiter syntax
constant (Emacs uses heuristics to figure out whether that character
is the beginning or the end of it).
@item Double-Drag-Mouse-1
@item Double-Drag-mouse-1
Select the text you drag across, in the form of whole words.
@item Triple-Mouse-1
@item Triple-mouse-1
Select the line you click on.
@item Triple-Drag-Mouse-1
@item Triple-Drag-mouse-1
Select the text you drag across, in the form of whole lines.
@end table
@node Mouse References
@section Following References with the Mouse
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(on buttons)}
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(on buttons)}
@kindex mouse-1 @r{(on buttons)}
@kindex mouse-2 @r{(on buttons)}
@cindex hyperlinks
@cindex links
@cindex text buttons
......@@ -256,14 +256,14 @@ cursor changes and the button lights up. If you change the variable
highlighting.
You can activate a button by moving point to it and typing
@key{RET}, or by clicking either @kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2} on the
@key{RET}, or by clicking either @kbd{mouse-1} or @kbd{mouse-2} on the
button. For example, in a Dired buffer, each file name is a button;
activating it causes Emacs to visit that file (@pxref{Dired}). In a
@file{*Compilation*} buffer, each error message is a button, and
activating it visits the source code for that error
(@pxref{Compilation}).
Although clicking @kbd{Mouse-1} on a button usually activates the
Although clicking @kbd{mouse-1} on a button usually activates the
button, if you hold the mouse button down for a period of time before
releasing it (specifically, for more than 450 milliseconds), then
Emacs moves point where you clicked, without activating the button.
......@@ -271,20 +271,20 @@ In this way, you can use the mouse to move point over a button without
activating it. Dragging the mouse over or onto a button has its usual
behavior of setting the region, and does not activate the button.
You can change how @kbd{Mouse-1} applies to buttons by customizing
You can change how @kbd{mouse-1} applies to buttons by customizing
the variable @code{mouse-1-click-follows-link}. If the value is a
positive integer, that determines how long you need to hold the mouse
button down for, in milliseconds, to cancel button activation; the
default is 450, as described in the previous paragraph. If the value
is @code{nil}, @kbd{Mouse-1} just sets point where you clicked, and
is @code{nil}, @kbd{mouse-1} just sets point where you clicked, and
does not activate buttons. If the value is @code{double}, double
clicks activate buttons but single clicks just set point.
@vindex mouse-1-click-in-non-selected-windows
Normally, @kbd{Mouse-1} on a button activates the button even if it
Normally, @kbd{mouse-1} on a button activates the button even if it
is in a non-selected window. If you change the variable
@code{mouse-1-click-in-non-selected-windows} to @code{nil},
@kbd{Mouse-1} on a button in an unselected window moves point to the
@kbd{mouse-1} on a button in an unselected window moves point to the
clicked position and selects that window, without activating the
button.
......@@ -295,21 +295,21 @@ button.
bring up menus.
@table @kbd
@item C-Mouse-1
@kindex C-Mouse-1
@item C-mouse-1
@kindex C-mouse-1
This menu is for selecting a buffer.
The MSB (``mouse select buffer'') global minor mode makes this
menu smarter and more customizable. @xref{Buffer Menus}.
@item C-Mouse-2
@kindex C-Mouse-2
@item C-mouse-2
@kindex C-mouse-2
This menu contains entries for examining faces and other text
properties, and well as for setting them (the latter is mainly useful
when editing enriched text; @pxref{Enriched Text}).
@item C-Mouse-3
@kindex C-Mouse-3
@item C-mouse-3
@kindex C-mouse-3
This menu is mode-specific. For most modes if Menu-bar mode is on,
this menu has the same items as all the mode-specific menu-bar menus
put together. Some modes may specify a different menu for this
......@@ -318,15 +318,15 @@ which would be present in the menu bar---not just the mode-specific
ones---so that you can access them without having to display the menu
bar.
@item S-Mouse-1
@item S-mouse-1
This menu is for changing the default face within the window's buffer.
@xref{Text Scale}.
@end table
Some graphical applications use @kbd{Mouse-3} for a mode-specific
menu. If you prefer @kbd{Mouse-3} in Emacs to bring up such a menu
Some graphical applications use @kbd{mouse-3} for a mode-specific
menu. If you prefer @kbd{mouse-3} in Emacs to bring up such a menu
instead of running the @code{mouse-save-then-kill} command, rebind
@kbd{Mouse-3} by adding the following line to your init file
@kbd{mouse-3} by adding the following line to your init file
(@pxref{Init Rebinding}):
@c FIXME: `mouse-popup-menubar-stuff' is obsolete since 23.1.
......@@ -349,32 +349,32 @@ the special bindings will be displayed (@pxref{Tooltips}). This
section's commands do not apply in those areas.
@table @kbd
@item Mouse-1
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-1} on a mode line selects the window it belongs to. By
dragging @kbd{Mouse-1} on the mode line, you can move it, thus
@item mouse-1
@kindex mouse-1 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{mouse-1} on a mode line selects the window it belongs to. By
dragging @kbd{mouse-1} on the mode line, you can move it, thus
changing the height of the windows above and below. Changing heights
with the mouse in this way never deletes windows, it just refuses to
make any window smaller than the minimum height.
@item Mouse-2
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-2} on a mode line expands that window to fill its frame.
@item mouse-2
@kindex mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{mouse-2} on a mode line expands that window to fill its frame.
@item Mouse-3
@kindex Mouse-3 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{Mouse-3} on a mode line deletes the window it belongs to. If the
@item mouse-3
@kindex mouse-3 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{mouse-3} on a mode line deletes the window it belongs to. If the
frame has only one window, it does nothing.
@item C-Mouse-2
@item C-mouse-2
@kindex C-mouse-2 @r{(mode line)}
@kbd{C-Mouse-2} on a mode line splits that window, producing two
@kbd{C-mouse-2} on a mode line splits that window, producing two
side-by-side windows with the boundary running through the click
position (@pxref{Split Window}).
@end table
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(scroll bar)}
Furthermore, by clicking and dragging @kbd{Mouse-1} on the divider
@kindex mouse-1 @r{(scroll bar)}
Furthermore, by clicking and dragging @kbd{mouse-1} on the divider
between two side-by-side mode lines, you can move the vertical
boundary to the left or right.
......@@ -919,17 +919,17 @@ those are drawn by the toolkit and not directly by Emacs.
@cindex Vertical Scroll Bar
On graphical displays, there is a @dfn{vertical scroll bar} on the
side of each Emacs window. Clicking @kbd{Mouse-1} on the scroll bar's
side of each Emacs window. Clicking @kbd{mouse-1} on the scroll bar's
up and down buttons scrolls the window by one line at a time. Clicking
@kbd{Mouse-1} above or below the scroll bar's inner box scrolls the
@kbd{mouse-1} above or below the scroll bar's inner box scrolls the
window by nearly the entire height of the window, like @kbd{M-v} and
@kbd{C-v} respectively (@pxref{Moving Point}). Dragging the inner box
scrolls continuously.
If Emacs is compiled on the X Window System without X toolkit
support, the scroll bar behaves differently. Clicking @kbd{Mouse-1}
support, the scroll bar behaves differently. Clicking @kbd{mouse-1}
anywhere on the scroll bar scrolls forward like @kbd{C-v}, while
@kbd{Mouse-3} scrolls backward like @kbd{M-v}. Clicking @kbd{Mouse-2}
@kbd{mouse-3} scrolls backward like @kbd{M-v}. Clicking @kbd{mouse-2}
in the scroll bar lets you drag the inner box up and down.
@findex scroll-bar-mode
......@@ -975,8 +975,8 @@ when the entire buffer is visible.
@cindex Horizontal Scroll Bar mode
On graphical displays with toolkit support, Emacs may also supply a
@dfn{horizontal scroll bar} on the bottom of each window. Clicking
@kbd{Mouse-1} on the that scroll bar's left and right buttons scrolls
the window horizontally by one column at a time. Clicking @kbd{Mouse-1}
@kbd{mouse-1} on the that scroll bar's left and right buttons scrolls
the window horizontally by one column at a time. Clicking @kbd{mouse-1}
on the left or right of the scroll bar's inner box scrolls the window by
four columns. Dragging the inner box scrolls the window continuously.
......@@ -1066,11 +1066,11 @@ argument is positive, off if the argument is not positive. To control
the use of menu bars at startup, customize the variable
@code{menu-bar-mode}.
@kindex C-Mouse-3 @r{(when menu bar is disabled)}
@kindex C-mouse-3 @r{(when menu bar is disabled)}
Expert users often turn off the menu bar, especially on text
terminals, where this makes one additional line available for text.
If the menu bar is off, you can still pop up a menu of its contents
with @kbd{C-Mouse-3} on a display which supports pop-up menus.
with @kbd{C-mouse-3} on a display which supports pop-up menus.
@xref{Menu Mouse Clicks}.
@xref{Menu Bar}, for information on how to invoke commands with the
......
......@@ -343,7 +343,7 @@ invoke it with. In our example, it would say that you can invoke
For more information about a function definition, variable or symbol
property listed in an apropos buffer, you can click on it with
@kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2}, or move there and type @key{RET}.
@kbd{mouse-1} or @kbd{mouse-2}, or move there and type @key{RET}.
When you specify more than one word in the apropos pattern, a name
must contain at least two of the words in order to match. Thus, if
......@@ -404,8 +404,8 @@ Follow a cross reference at point (@code{help-follow}).
Move point forward to the next hyperlink (@code{forward-button}).
@item S-@key{TAB}
Move point back to the previous hyperlink (@code{backward-button}).
@item Mouse-1
@itemx Mouse-2
@item mouse-1
@itemx mouse-2
Follow a hyperlink that you click on.
@item C-c C-c
Show all documentation about the symbol at point
......@@ -427,7 +427,7 @@ Go back to the previous help topic (@code{help-go-back}).
appears in the documentation in the help buffer, it is normally an
underlined @dfn{hyperlink}. To view the associated documentation,
move point there and type @key{RET} (@code{help-follow}), or click on
the hyperlink with @kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2}. Doing so replaces
the hyperlink with @kbd{mouse-1} or @kbd{mouse-2}. Doing so replaces
the contents of the help buffer; to retrace your steps, type @kbd{C-c
C-b} (@code{help-go-back}). While retracing your steps, you can go
forward by using @kbd{C-c C-b} (@code{help-go-forward}).
......
......@@ -587,9 +587,9 @@ you can access it using the following Emacs commands:
@table @kbd
@findex mouse-set-secondary
@kindex M-Drag-Mouse-1
@kindex M-Drag-mouse-1
@cindex secondary-selection face
@item M-Drag-Mouse-1
@item M-Drag-mouse-1
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the place where you press
down the button, and the other end at the place where you release it
(@code{mouse-set-secondary}). The selected text is highlighted, using
......@@ -600,31 +600,31 @@ window, just like @code{mouse-set-region} (@pxref{Mouse Commands}).
This command does not alter the kill ring.
@findex mouse-start-secondary
@kindex M-Mouse-1
@item M-Mouse-1
@kindex M-mouse-1
@item M-mouse-1
Set one endpoint for the @dfn{secondary selection}
(@code{mouse-start-secondary}).
@findex mouse-secondary-save-then-kill
@kindex M-Mouse-3
@item M-Mouse-3
@kindex M-mouse-3
@item M-mouse-3
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the position clicked and
the other at the position specified with @kbd{M-Mouse-1}
the other at the position specified with @kbd{M-mouse-1}
(@code{mouse-secondary-save-then-kill}). This also puts the selected
text in the kill ring. A second @kbd{M-Mouse-3} at the same place