Commit e598186c authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman

Display Vars node renamed Display Custom.

Include info there about customizing cursor appearance.
Clean up aggressive scrolling.
Clarify horizontal scrolling discussion.
Fix index entries for line number mode.
parent a8ef67ae
......@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ display it.
* Selective Display:: Hiding lines with lots of indentation.
* Optional Mode Line:: Optional mode line display features.
* Text Display:: How text characters are normally displayed.
* Display Vars:: Information on variables for customizing display.
* Display Custom:: Information on variables for customizing display.
@end menu
@node Scrolling
......@@ -131,23 +131,24 @@ By default, @code{scroll-conservatively} is 0.
@cindex aggressive scrolling
@vindex scroll-up-aggressively
@vindex scroll-down-aggressively
If you prefer a more aggressive scrolling, customize the values of the
variables @code{scroll-up-aggressively} and
@code{scroll-down-aggressively}. The value of
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either nil or a fraction @var{f}
between 0 and 1. If it is a fraction, that specifies where on the
screen to put point when scrolling upward. More precisely, when a
window scrolls up because point is above the window start, the new start
position is chosen to put point @var{f} part of the window height from
the top. The larger @var{f}, the more aggressive the scrolling.
A value of @code{nil} is equivalent to .5, since its effect is to center
point.
Likewise, @code{scroll-down-aggressively} is used for scrolling down.
The value, @var{f}, specifies how far point should be placed from the
bottom of the window; thus, as with @code{scroll-up-aggressively}, a
larger value scrolls more aggressively.
When the window does scroll by a longer distance, you can control
how aggressively it scrolls, by setting the variables
@code{scroll-up-aggressively} and @code{scroll-down-aggressively}.
The value of @code{scroll-up-aggressively} should be either
@code{nil}, or a fraction @var{f} between 0 and 1. A fraction
specifies where on the screen to put point when scrolling upward.
More precisely, when a window scrolls up because point is above the
window start, the new start position is chosen to put point @var{f}
part of the window height from the top. The larger @var{f}, the more
aggressive the scrolling.
@code{nil}, which is the default, scrolls to put point at the center.
So it is equivalent to .5.
Likewise, @code{scroll-down-aggressively} is used for scrolling
down. The value, @var{f}, specifies how far point should be placed
from the bottom of the window; thus, as with
@code{scroll-up-aggressively}, a larger value is more aggressive.
@vindex scroll-margin
The variable @code{scroll-margin} restricts how close point can come
......@@ -161,8 +162,18 @@ window, Emacs recenters the window. By default, @code{scroll-margin} is
@cindex horizontal scrolling
@dfn{Horizontal scrolling} means shifting all the lines sideways
within a window---so that some of the text near the left margin
is not displayed at all.
within a window---so that some of the text near the left margin is not
displayed at all. Emacs does this automatically, in any window that
uses line truncation rather than continuation: whenever point moves
off the left or right edge of the screen, Emacs scrolls the buffer
horizontally to make point visible.
When a window has been scrolled horizontally, text lines are truncated
rather than continued (@pxref{Continuation Lines}), with a @samp{$}
appearing in the first column when there is text truncated to the left,
and in the last column when there is text truncated to the right.
You can use these commands to do explicit horizontal scrolling.
@table @kbd
@item C-x <
......@@ -171,11 +182,6 @@ Scroll text in current window to the left (@code{scroll-left}).
Scroll to the right (@code{scroll-right}).
@end table
When a window has been scrolled horizontally, text lines are truncated
rather than continued (@pxref{Continuation Lines}), with a @samp{$}
appearing in the first column when there is text truncated to the left,
and in the last column when there is text truncated to the right.
@kindex C-x <
@kindex C-x >
@findex scroll-left
......@@ -193,18 +199,14 @@ attempting to do so has no effect. This means that you don't have to
calculate the argument precisely for @w{@kbd{C-x >}}; any sufficiently large
argument will restore the normal display.
@cindex horizontal scrolling
@vindex automatic-hscrolling
Emacs automatically scrolls a window horizontally whenever that is
necessary to keep point visible and not too far from the left or right
edge. If you don't want this, customize the variable
@code{automatic-hscrolling} and set it to nil.
If you scroll a window horizontally by hand, that sets a lower bound
for automatic horizontal scrolling. Automatic scrolling will continue
to scroll the window, but never further to the right than the amount
you previously set by @code{scroll-left}.
If a window is scrolled horizontally by means of @code{scroll-left}, the
chosen column serves as a lower bound for automatic horizontal
scrolling. Automatic scrolling will continue to scroll the window to
the left, if necessary, but won't scroll it more to the right than the
column set by @code{scroll-left}.
@vindex automatic-hscrolling
To disable automatic horizontal scrolling, set the variable
@code{automatic-hscrolling} to @code{nil}.
@node Follow Mode
@section Follow Mode
......@@ -256,8 +258,8 @@ hidden lines. This variable becomes local automatically when set.
@node Optional Mode Line
@section Optional Mode Line Features
@cindex Line Number mode
@cindex mode, Line Number
@cindex line number display
@cindex display of line number
@findex line-number-mode
The current line number of point appears in the mode line when Line
Number mode is enabled. Use the command @kbd{M-x line-number-mode} to
......@@ -267,7 +269,6 @@ indicate what it is. @xref{Minor Modes}, for more information about
minor modes and about how to use this command.
@vindex line-number-display-limit
@cindex line number display, removing the limit
If the buffer is very large (larger than the value of
@code{line-number-display-limit}), then the line number doesn't appear.
Emacs doesn't compute the line number when the buffer is large, because
......@@ -364,8 +365,8 @@ they are displayed using their graphics (assuming your terminal supports
them), otherwise as escape sequences. @xref{Single-Byte Character
Support}.
@node Display Vars
@section Variables Controlling Display
@node Display Custom
@section Customization of Display
This section contains information for customization only. Beginning
users should skip it.
......@@ -449,11 +450,25 @@ of actual data transmission, but the value is used for calculations such
as padding. On terminals, it also affects decisions about whether to
scroll part of the screen or redraw it instead.
On window-systems, @code{baud-rate} is only used to determine how
frequently to look for pending input during display updating. A higher
value of @code{baud-rate} means that check for pending input will be
done less frequently.
On window-systems, @code{baud-rate} is only used to determine how
frequently to look for pending input during display updating. A
higher value of @code{baud-rate} means that check for pending input
will be done less frequently.
You can customize the way any particular character code is displayed
by means of a display table. @xref{Display Tables,, Display Tables,
elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@findex hl-line-mode
@findex blink-cursor-mode
@cindex cursor, locating visually
@cindex cursor, blinking
There are a number of ways to customize the display of the cursor.
@kbd{M-x hl-line-mode} enables or disables a global minor mode which
highlights the line around point. On window systems, the command
@kbd{M-x blink-cursor-mode} turns on or off the blinking of the
cursor. (On terminals, the terminal itself blinks the cursor, and
Emacs has no say over it.)
You can customize the cursor's color, and whether it blinks, using
the @code{cursor} Custom group (@pxref{Easy Customization}).
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