Commit e7a3ff06 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
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Document scroll-up-line and scroll-down-line in Emacs manual.

* doc/emacs/display.texi (Scrolling): Document scroll-up-line and
scroll-down-line.  Document scroll-command property.
(Recentering): New node, split off from Scrolling.

Also, minor copyedits to standardize on the phrase "key binding"
rather than "keybinding" in the manual.
parent 4a623313
2011-10-24 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* display.texi (Scrolling): Document scroll-up-line and
scroll-down-line. Document scroll-command property.
(Recentering): New node, split off from Scrolling.
2011-10-23 Chong Yidong <cyd@gnu.org>
* frames.texi (Scroll Bars): GTK uses right scroll bars now.
......
......@@ -13,6 +13,7 @@ the text is displayed.
@menu
* Scrolling:: Commands to move text up and down in a window.
* Recentering:: A scroll command that centers the current line.
* Auto Scrolling:: Redisplay scrolls text automatically when needed.
* Horizontal Scrolling:: Moving text left and right in a window.
* Narrowing:: Restricting display and editing to a portion
......@@ -48,15 +49,15 @@ portion of the buffer is displayed.
Scrolling ``forward'' or ``up'' advances the portion of the buffer
displayed in the window; equivalently, it moves the buffer text
upwards relative to the window. Scrolling ``backward'' or ``down''
moves the displayed portion backwards, and moves the text downwards
relative to the window. In Emacs, scrolling ``up'' or ``down'' refers
to the direction that the text moves in the window, @emph{not} the
direction that the window moves relative to the text; this terminology
was taken up by Emacs before the modern meaning of ``scrolling up''
and ``scrolling down'' became widely adopted. Hence the strange
result that @key{PageDown} scrolls ``up'' in the Emacs sense. In this
manual, we refer to scrolling ``forward'' and ``backward'' where
possible, in order to minimize confusion.
displays an earlier portion of the buffer, and moves the text
downwards relative to the window.
In Emacs, scrolling ``up'' or ``down'' refers to the direction that
the text moves in the window, @emph{not} the direction that the window
moves relative to the text. This terminology was adopted by Emacs
before the modern meaning of ``scrolling up'' and ``scrolling down''
became widespread. Hence, the strange result that @key{PageDown}
scrolls ``up'' in the Emacs sense.
The portion of a buffer displayed in a window always contains point.
If you move point past the bottom or top of the window, scrolling
......@@ -64,11 +65,6 @@ occurs automatically to bring it back onscreen (@pxref{Auto
Scrolling}). You can also scroll explicitly with these commands:
@table @kbd
@item C-l
Scroll the selected window so that the current line is the center-most
text line; on subsequent consecutive invocations, make the current
line the top-most line, the bottom-most line, and so on in cyclic
order; also, maybe redisplay the screen (@code{recenter-top-bottom}).
@item C-v
@itemx @key{next}
@itemx @key{PageDown}
......@@ -77,6 +73,86 @@ Scroll forward by nearly a full window (@code{scroll-up-command}).
@itemx @key{prior}
@itemx @key{PageUp}
Scroll backward (@code{scroll-down-command}).
@end table
@kindex C-v
@kindex M-v
@kindex next
@kindex prior
@kindex PageDown
@kindex PageUp
@findex scroll-up-command
@findex scroll-down-command
@kbd{C-v} (@code{scroll-up-command}) scrolls forward by nearly the
whole window height. The effect is to take the two lines at the
bottom of the window and put them at the top, followed by lines that
were not previously visible. If point was in the text that scrolled
off the top, it ends up on the window's new topmost line. The
@key{next} (or @key{PageDown}) key is equivalent to @kbd{C-v}.
@kbd{M-v} (@code{scroll-down-command}) scrolls backward in a similar
way. The @key{prior} (or @key{PageUp}) key is equivalent to
@kbd{M-v}.
@vindex next-screen-context-lines
The number of lines of overlap left by these scroll commands is
controlled by the variable @code{next-screen-context-lines}, whose
default value is 2. You can supply the commands with a numeric prefix
argument, @var{n}, to scroll by @var{n} lines; Emacs attempts to leave
point unchanged, so that the text and point move up or down together.
@kbd{C-v} with a negative argument is like @kbd{M-v} and vice versa.
@vindex scroll-error-top-bottom
By default, these commands signal an error (by beeping or flashing
the screen) if no more scrolling is possible, because the window has
reached the beginning or end of the buffer. If you change the
variable @code{scroll-error-top-bottom} to @code{t}, the command moves
point to the farthest possible position. If point is already there,
the command signals an error.
@vindex scroll-preserve-screen-position
@cindex @code{scroll-command} property
Some users like scroll commands to keep point at the same screen
position, so that scrolling back to the same screen conveniently
returns point to its original position. You can enable this behavior
via the variable @code{scroll-preserve-screen-position}. If the value
is @code{t}, Emacs adjusts point to keep the cursor at the same screen
position whenever a scroll command moves it off-window, rather than
moving it to the topmost or bottommost line. With any other
non-@code{nil} value, Emacs adjusts point this way even if the scroll
command leaves point in the window. This variable affects all the
scroll commands documented in this section, as well as scrolling with
the mouse wheel (@pxref{Wheeled Mice}); in general, it affects any
command that has a non-@code{nil} @code{scroll-command} property.
@xref{Property Lists,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}.
@vindex scroll-up
@vindex scroll-down
@findex scroll-up-line
@findex scroll-down-line
The commands @kbd{M-x scroll-up} and @kbd{M-x scroll-down} behave
similarly to @code{scroll-up-command} and @code{scroll-down-command},
except they do not obey @code{scroll-error-top-bottom}. Prior to
Emacs 24, these were the default commands for scrolling up and down.
The commands @kbd{M-x scroll-up-line} and @kbd{M-x scroll-down-line}
scroll the current window by one line at a time. If you intend to use
any of these commands, you might want to give them key bindings
(@pxref{Init Rebinding}).
@node Recentering
@section Recentering
@table @kbd
@item C-l
Scroll the selected window so the current line is the center-most text
line; on subsequent consecutive invocations, make the current line the
top line, the bottom line, and so on in cyclic order. Possibly
redisplay the screen too (@code{recenter-top-bottom}).
@item M-x recenter
Scroll the selected window so the current line is the center-most text
line. Possibly redisplay the screen too.
@item C-M-l
Scroll heuristically to bring useful information onto the screen
(@code{reposition-window}).
......@@ -107,14 +183,13 @@ non-zero value @var{n}, @kbd{C-l} always leaves at least @var{n}
screen lines between point and the top or bottom of the window
(@pxref{Auto Scrolling}).
You can also supply @kbd{C-l} with a prefix argument. With a plain
prefix argument, @kbd{C-u C-l}, Emacs simply recenters point. With a
positive argument @var{n}, it scrolls to place point @var{n} lines
down from the top of the window. An argument of zero puts point on
the topmost line. A negative argument @var{-n} puts point @var{n}
lines from the bottom of the window. When given an argument,
@kbd{C-l} does not clear the screen or cycle through different screen
positions.
You can also give @kbd{C-l} a prefix argument. A plain prefix
argument, @kbd{C-u C-l}, simply recenters point. A positive argument
@var{n} puts point @var{n} lines down from the top of the window. An
argument of zero puts point on the topmost line. A negative argument
@var{-n} puts point @var{n} lines from the bottom of the window. When
given an argument, @kbd{C-l} does not clear the screen or cycle
through different screen positions.
@vindex recenter-redisplay
If the variable @code{recenter-redisplay} has a non-@code{nil}
......@@ -127,62 +202,6 @@ becomes garbled for any reason (@pxref{Screen Garbled}).
The more primitive command @kbd{M-x recenter} behaves like
@code{recenter-top-bottom}, but does not cycle among screen positions.
@kindex C-v
@kindex M-v
@kindex next
@kindex prior
@kindex PageDown
@kindex PageUp
@findex scroll-up-command
@findex scroll-down-command
@kbd{C-v} (@code{scroll-up-command}) scrolls forward by nearly the
whole window height. The effect is to take the two lines at the
bottom of the window and put them at the top, followed by lines that
were not previously visible. If point was in the text that scrolled
off the top, it ends up on the window's new topmost line.
Similarly, @kbd{M-v} (@code{scroll-down-command}) scrolls backward.
We refer to @kbd{C-v} and @kbd{M-v} as @dfn{full-screen scroll
commands}. The function key @key{next}, or @key{PageDown}, is
equivalent to @kbd{C-v}; the function key @key{prior}, or
@key{PageUp}, is equivalent to @kbd{M-v}.
@vindex next-screen-context-lines
The variable @code{next-screen-context-lines} controls the number of
lines of overlap left by the full-screen scroll commands; by default,
it is 2. You can supply these commands with a numeric prefix argument
@var{n}. This scrolls the window by @var{n} lines, while attempting
to leave point unchanged (so that the text and point move up or down
together). @kbd{C-v} with a negative argument is like @kbd{M-v} and
vice versa.
@vindex scroll-error-top-bottom
By default, the full-screen scroll commands signal an error (by
beeping or flashing the screen) if no more scrolling is possible,
because the window has reached the beginning or end of the buffer. If
you change the variable @code{scroll-error-top-bottom} to @code{t},
Emacs instead moves point to the farthest possible position. If point
is already there, the command signals an error.
@vindex scroll-preserve-screen-position
Some users like scroll commands to keep point at the same screen
position. Then, scrolling back to the same screen also conveniently
returns point to its original position. You can enable this via the
variable @code{scroll-preserve-screen-position}. If the value is
@code{t}, Emacs adjusts point to keep it at the same vertical position
within the window, rather than the window edge, whenever a scroll
command moves it off the window. With any other non-@code{nil} value,
Emacs adjusts point this way even if the scroll command leaves point
in the window.
@vindex scroll-up
@vindex scroll-down
The commands @code{scroll-up} and @code{scroll-down} behave
similarly to @code{scroll-up-command} and @code{scroll-down-command},
except they do not obey @code{scroll-error-top-bottom}. Prior to
Emacs 24, these were the default commands for scrolling up and down.
@kindex C-M-l
@findex reposition-window
@kbd{C-M-l} (@code{reposition-window}) scrolls the current window
......
......@@ -342,6 +342,7 @@ Registers
Controlling the Display
* Scrolling:: Commands to move text up and down in a window.
* Recentering:: A scrolling command that centers the current line.
* Auto Scrolling:: Redisplay scrolls text automatically when needed.
* Horizontal Scrolling:: Moving text left and right in a window.
* Narrowing:: Restricting display and editing to a portion
......
......@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ beginning of the line and then executing the macro.
@findex kmacro-start-macro
@findex kmacro-end-macro
In addition to the @key{F3} and @key{F4} commands described above,
Emacs also supports an older set of keybindings for defining and
Emacs also supports an older set of key bindings for defining and
executing keyboard macros. To begin a macro definition, type @kbd{C-x
(} (@code{kmacro-start-macro}); as with @key{F3}, a prefix argument
appends this definition to the last keyboard macro. To end a macro
......
......@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ Support}), but we hope to improve it in the future.
By default, the @key{alt} and @key{option} keys are the same as
@key{Meta}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
Emacs provides a set of keybindings using this modifier key that mimic
Emacs provides a set of key bindings using this modifier key that mimic
other Mac / GNUstep applications (@pxref{Mac / GNUstep Events}). You
can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key Bindings}).
......
......@@ -1441,7 +1441,7 @@ parsed, and move point there (@code{semantic-complete-jump}).
@kindex C-c , @key{SPC}
Display a list of possible completions for the symbol at point
(@code{semantic-complete-analyze-inline}). This also activates a set
of special keybindings for choosing a completion: @key{RET} accepts
of special key bindings for choosing a completion: @key{RET} accepts
the current completion, @kbd{M-n} and @kbd{M-p} cycle through possible
completions, @key{TAB} completes as far as possible and then cycles,
and @kbd{C-g} or any other key aborts completion.
......
......@@ -1242,11 +1242,12 @@ coding system, the result should be readable.
@node Rmail Editing
@section Editing Within a Message
Most of the usual Emacs keybindings are available in Rmail mode, though a
few, such as @kbd{C-M-n} and @kbd{C-M-h}, are redefined by Rmail for
other purposes. However, the Rmail buffer is normally read only, and
most of the letters are redefined as Rmail commands. If you want to
edit the text of a message, you must use the Rmail command @kbd{e}.
Most of the usual Emacs key bindings are available in Rmail mode,
though a few, such as @kbd{C-M-n} and @kbd{C-M-h}, are redefined by
Rmail for other purposes. However, the Rmail buffer is normally read
only, and most of the letters are redefined as Rmail commands. If you
want to edit the text of a message, you must use the Rmail command
@kbd{e}.
@table @kbd
@item e
......
......@@ -268,8 +268,8 @@ use it (@pxref{Rebinding}).
@vindex isearch-mode-map
When incremental search is active, you can type @kbd{C-h C-h} to
access interactive help options, including a list of special
keybindings. These keybindings are part of the keymap
access interactive help options, including a list of special key
bindings. These key bindings are part of the keymap
@code{isearch-mode-map} (@pxref{Keymaps}).
@node Isearch Yank
......
......@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ of buffer at first key-press (instead move to top/bottom of buffer)
when `scroll-error-top-bottom' is non-nil.
+++
*** New variable `scroll-error-top-bottom' (see above).
+++
*** New scrolling commands `scroll-up-line' and `scroll-down-line'
scroll a line instead of full screen.
+++
......
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