Commit e9f5524e authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

(Cut/Paste Other App): Document yank-pop-change-selection.

(Secondary Selection): Fix modified mouse click syntax.
(Clipboard): Describe Cut, Copy and Paste commands.
(Mouse References): Not all references are in read-only buffers.
parent 25597d40
......@@ -232,13 +232,12 @@ Select the text you drag across, in the form of whole lines.
@cindex X selection
@cindex primary selection
@cindex selection, primary
When running Emacs under the X window system, you can transfer text
between Emacs and other X applications using the @dfn{primary
selection}. The primary selection is sometimes also referred to as
the @dfn{X selection}. It @emph{not} the same thing as the
@dfn{clipboard}, a separate facility used on desktop environments such
as Gnome, and on operating systems such as Microsoft Windows
(@pxref{Clipboard}).
When running Emacs under the X window system, you can easily
transfer text between Emacs and other X applications using the
@dfn{primary selection} (also called the @dfn{X selection}). This is
@emph{not} the same thing as the @dfn{clipboard}, which is a separate
facility used on desktop environments such as Gnome, and on operating
systems such as Microsoft Windows (@pxref{Clipboard}).
Under X, whenever you select some text in Emacs by dragging or
clicking the mouse (@pxref{Mouse Commands}), it is also saved in the
......@@ -254,12 +253,17 @@ contents of the primary selection are lost.
such as @kbd{M-w} (@code{kill-ring-save}), that text is also saved in
the primary selection. @xref{Killing}.
@vindex select-active-regions
@vindex yank-pop-change-selection
If you set the region using the keyboard, the text within the region
is not saved to the primary selection. However, if you change the
variable @code{select-active-regions} to @code{t}, the region is
automatically saved to the primary selection each time you activate
the mark (however, the primary selection is @emph{not} updated if you
subsequently change the region by moving point).
is not normally saved to the primary selection. However, if you
change the variable @code{select-active-regions} to @code{t}, the
region is saved to the primary selection each time you activate the
mark (the primary selection is @emph{not} updated if you subsequently
change the region by moving point). If you change the variable
@code{yank-pop-change-selection} to @code{t}, rotating the kill ring
with @kbd{M-y} (@code{yank-pop}) also saves the new yank to the
primary selection (@pxref{Yanking}).
@cindex cut buffer
@vindex x-cut-buffer-max
......@@ -290,89 +294,97 @@ different data type by modifying the variable
@subsection Secondary Selection
@cindex secondary selection
The @dfn{secondary selection} is another way of selecting text using
the X Window System. It does not use point or the mark, so you can
use it to kill text without setting point or the mark.
In addition to the primary selection, the X Window System provides a
second similar facility known as the @dfn{secondary selection}.
Nowadays, few X applications make use of the secondary selection, but
you can access it using the following Emacs commands:
@table @kbd
@findex mouse-set-secondary
@kindex M-Drag-Mouse-1
@item M-Drag-Mouse-1
@item M-@key{Drag-Mouse-1}
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the place where you press
down the button, and the other end at the place where you release it
(@code{mouse-set-secondary}). The highlighting appears and changes as
you drag. You can control the appearance of the highlighting by
customizing the @code{secondary-selection} face (@pxref{Face
Customization}).
(@code{mouse-set-secondary}). The selected text is highlighted, using
the @code{secondary-selection} face, as you drag. The window scrolls
automatically if you drag the mouse off the top or bottom of the
window, just like @code{mouse-set-region} (@pxref{Mouse Commands}).
If you move the mouse off the top or bottom of the window while
dragging, the window scrolls at a steady rate until you move the mouse
back into the window. This way, you can mark regions that don't fit
entirely on the screen.
This way of setting the secondary selection does not alter the kill ring.
This command does not alter the kill ring.
@findex mouse-start-secondary
@kindex M-Mouse-1
@item M-Mouse-1
@item M-@key{Mouse-1}
Set one endpoint for the @dfn{secondary selection}
(@code{mouse-start-secondary}).
@findex mouse-secondary-save-then-kill
@kindex M-Mouse-3
@item M-Mouse-3
Make a secondary selection, using the place specified with @kbd{M-Mouse-1}
as the other end (@code{mouse-secondary-save-then-kill}). This also
puts the selected text in the kill ring. A second click at the same
@item M-@key{Mouse-3}
Set the secondary selection, with one end at the position clicked and
the other at the position specified with @kbd{M-Mouse-1}
(@code{mouse-secondary-save-then-kill}). This also puts the selected
text in the kill ring. A second @kbd{M-@key{Mouse-3}} at the same
place kills the secondary selection just made.
@findex mouse-yank-secondary
@kindex M-Mouse-2
@item M-Mouse-2
Insert the secondary selection where you click
(@code{mouse-yank-secondary}). This places point at the end of the
yanked text.
@item M-@key{Mouse-2}
Insert the secondary selection where you click, placing point at the
end of the yanked text (@code{mouse-yank-secondary}).
@end table
Double or triple clicking of @kbd{M-Mouse-1} operates on words and
lines, much like @kbd{Mouse-1}.
Double or triple clicking of @kbd{M-@key{Mouse-1}} operates on words
and lines, much like @key{Mouse-1}.
If @code{mouse-yank-at-point} is non-@code{nil}, @kbd{M-Mouse-2} yanks
at point. Then it does not matter precisely where you click, or even
which of the frame's windows you click on. @xref{Mouse Commands}.
If @code{mouse-yank-at-point} is non-@code{nil}, @kbd{M-@key{Mouse-2}}
yanks at point. Then it does not matter precisely where you click, or
even which of the frame's windows you click on. @xref{Mouse
Commands}.
@node Clipboard
@subsection Using the Clipboard
@cindex clipboard
@vindex x-select-enable-clipboard
@findex menu-bar-enable-clipboard
@cindex OpenWindows
@cindex Gnome
Apart from the primary and secondary selection types, Emacs can
handle the @dfn{clipboard} selection type which is used by some
desktop environments, such as Gnome.
In desktop environments such as Gnome, and operating systems such as
Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X, you can transfer data (usually text)
between different applications using the @dfn{clipboard}. The
clipboard is distinct from the primary selection and secondary
selection discussed earlier. You can access the clipboard through the
@samp{Edit} menu of the menu bar (@pxref{Menu Bar}).
The command @kbd{M-x menu-bar-enable-clipboard} makes the @code{Cut},
@code{Paste} and @code{Copy} menu items, as well as the keys of the same
names, all use the clipboard.
@cindex cut
@findex clipboard-kill-region
The command @code{clipboard-kill-region}, which is bound to the
@code{Cut} menu item, kills the region and saves it in the clipboard.
You can customize the variable @code{x-select-enable-clipboard} to make
the Emacs yank functions consult the clipboard before the primary
@cindex copy
@findex clipboard-kill-ring-save
The command @code{clipboard-kill-ring-save}, which is bound to the
@code{Copy} menu item, copies the region to the kill ring and saves it
in the clipboard.
@cindex paste
The @code{Paste} menu item in the Edit menu yanks the contents of
the clipboard at point.
@vindex x-select-enable-clipboard
You can customize the variable @code{x-select-enable-clipboard} to
make the Emacs yank functions consult the clipboard before the primary
selection, and to make the kill functions to store in the clipboard as
well as the primary selection. Otherwise they do not access the
clipboard at all. Using the clipboard is the default on MS-Windows and Mac,
but not on other systems.
well as the primary selection. Otherwise, these commands do not
access the clipboard at all. Using the clipboard is the default on
MS-Windows and Mac OS, but not on other systems.
@node Mouse References
@section Following References with the Mouse
@kindex Mouse-1 @r{(selection)}
@kindex Mouse-2 @r{(selection)}
Some read-only Emacs buffers include references you can follow, or
commands you can activate. These include names of files, of buffers,
of possible completions, of matches for a pattern, as well as the
buttons in Help buffers and customization buffers. You can follow the
Some Emacs buffers include references you can follow, or commands
you can activate. These include names of files, of buffers, of
possible completions, of matches for a pattern, as well as the buttons
in Help buffers and customization buffers. You can follow the
reference or activate the command by moving point to it and typing
@key{RET}. You can also do this with the mouse, using either
@kbd{Mouse-1} or @kbd{Mouse-2}.
......
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