Commit ebc6903b authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
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*** empty log message ***

parent 40f40667
......@@ -335,7 +335,7 @@ overlaps the overlay on exit from the search.
During the search, such overlays are made temporarily visible by
temporarily modifying their invisible and intangible properties. If you
want this to be done differently for a certain overlay, give it a
want this to be done differently for a certain overlay, give it an
@code{isearch-open-invisible-temporary} property which is a function.
The function is called with two arguments: the first is the overlay, and
the second is @code{t} to make the overlay visible, or @code{nil} to
......
......@@ -867,9 +867,10 @@ correctly; Edebug will tell you when you have tried enough different
conditions that each form has returned two different values.
Coverage testing makes execution slower, so it is only done if
@code{edebug-test-coverage} is non-@code{nil}. Whether or not coverage
testing is enabled, frequency counting is performed for all execution of
an instrumented function, even if the execution mode is Go-nonstop.
@code{edebug-test-coverage} is non-@code{nil}. Frequency counting is
performed for all execution of an instrumented function, even if the
execution mode is Go-nonstop, and regardless of whether coverage testing
is enabled.
Use @kbd{M-x edebug-display-freq-count} to display both the
coverage information and the frequency counts for a definition.
......@@ -1185,8 +1186,9 @@ elements must all match or none, use @code{&optional
@item &rest
@kindex &rest @r{(Edebug)}
All following elements in the specification list are repeated zero or
more times. In the last repetition, however, it is ok if the expression
runs out before matching all of the elements of the specification list.
more times. In the last repetition, however, it is not a problem if the
expression runs out before matching all of the elements of the
specification list.
To repeat only a few elements, use @code{[&rest @var{specs}@dots{}]}.
To specify several elements that must all match on every repetition, use
......
......@@ -698,7 +698,7 @@ Frames
* Pop-Up Menus:: Displaying a menu for the user to select from.
* Dialog Boxes:: Displaying a box to ask yes or no.
* Pointer Shapes:: Specifying the shape of the mouse pointer.
* Window System Selections::Transferring text to and from other window.
* Window System Selections::Transferring text to and from other windows.
* Color Names:: Getting the definitions of color names.
* Resources:: Getting resource values from the server.
* Server Data:: Getting info about the X server.
......
......@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ See @code{/} and @code{%} in @ref{Numbers}.
@xref{Read Only Buffers}.
@item cyclic-function-indirection
@code{"Symbol's chain of function indirections@* contains a loop"}@*
@code{"Symbol's chain of function indirections\@* contains a loop"}@*
@xref{Function Indirection}.
@item end-of-buffer
......
......@@ -576,10 +576,10 @@ The argument @var{pretend} has the same meaning as in
@findex set-screen-height
@findex set-screen-width
The old-fashioned functions @code{set-screen-height} and
@code{set-screen-width}, which were used to specify the height and width
of the screen in Emacs versions that did not support multiple frames,
are still usable. They apply to the selected frame.
The older functions @code{set-screen-height} and
@code{set-screen-width} were used to specify the height and width of the
screen, in Emacs versions that did not support multiple frames. They
are semi-obsolete, but still work; they apply to the selected frame.
@defun x-parse-geometry geom
@cindex geometry specification
......
......@@ -1182,8 +1182,8 @@ frame at a time.
@defvar mode-line-buffer-identification
This variable identifies the buffer being displayed in the window. Its
default value is @code{("%12b")}, which means that it usually displays
twelve characters of the buffer name.
default value is @code{("%12b")}, which displays the buffer name, padded
with spaces to at least 12 columns.
@end defvar
@defvar global-mode-string
......@@ -1484,7 +1484,8 @@ For example, Fortran mode uses it this way:
The @code{imenu-generic-expression} patterns can then use @samp{\\sw+}
instead of @samp{\\(\\sw\\|\\s_\\)+}. Note that this technique may be
inconvenient to use when the mode needs to limit the initial character
of a name to a smaller set of characters
of a name to a smaller set of characters than are allowed in the rest
of a name.
Setting this variable makes it buffer-local in the current buffer.
@end defvar
......
......@@ -704,13 +704,13 @@ systems used for I/O to a subprocess.
@tindex select-safe-coding-system
@defun select-safe-coding-system from to &optional preferred-coding-system
This function selects a coding system for encoding the between
This function selects a coding system for encoding the text between
@var{from} and @var{to}, asking the user to choose if necessary.
The optional argument @var{preferred-coding-system} specifies a coding
system try first. If it can handle the text in the specified region,
then it is used. If this argument is omitted, the current buffer's
value of @code{buffer-file-coding-system} is tried first.
system to try first. If that one can handle the text in the specified
region, then it is used. If this argument is omitted, the current
buffer's value of @code{buffer-file-coding-system} is tried first.
If the region contains some multibyte characters that the preferred
coding system cannot encode, this function asks the user to choose from
......
......@@ -321,8 +321,8 @@ $2^{26}$
@end ifinfo
bit as well as the code for the corresponding non-control
character. Ordinary terminals have no way of generating non-@sc{ASCII}
control characters, but you can generate them straightforwardly using an
X terminal.
control characters, but you can generate them straightforwardly using X
and other window systems.
For historical reasons, Emacs treats the @key{DEL} character as
the control equivalent of @kbd{?}:
......@@ -433,7 +433,7 @@ important than the @sc{ASCII} representation.
and the hexadecimal character code. You can use any number of hex
digits, so you can represent any character code in this way.
Thus, @samp{?\x41} for the character @kbd{A}, @samp{?\x1} for the
character @kbd{C-a}, and @code{?\x8c0} for the character
character @kbd{C-a}, and @code{?\x8e0} for the character
@iftex
@samp{@`a}.
@end iftex
......@@ -553,17 +553,21 @@ same object, @code{nil}.
@subsection Cons Cell and List Types
@cindex address field of register
@cindex decrement field of register
@cindex pointers
A @dfn{cons cell} is an object comprising two pointers named the
@sc{car} and the @sc{cdr}. Each of them can point to any Lisp object.
A @dfn{cons cell} is an object that consists of two pointers or slots,
called the @sc{car} slot and the @sc{cdr} slot. Each slot can
@dfn{point to} or hold to any Lisp object. We also say that the ``the
@sc{car} of this cons cell is'' whatever object its @sc{car} slot
currently points to, and likewise for the @sc{cdr}.
A @dfn{list} is a series of cons cells, linked together so that the
@sc{cdr} of each cons cell points either to another cons cell or to the
@sc{cdr} slot of each cons cell holds either the next cons cell or the
empty list. @xref{Lists}, for functions that work on lists. Because
most cons cells are used as part of lists, the phrase @dfn{list
structure} has come to refer to any structure made out of cons cells.
The names @sc{car} and @sc{cdr} have only historical meaning now. The
The names @sc{car} and @sc{cdr} derive from the history of Lisp. The
original Lisp implementation ran on an @w{IBM 704} computer which
divided words into two parts, called the ``address'' part and the
``decrement''; @sc{car} was an instruction to extract the contents of
......@@ -584,18 +588,19 @@ right parenthesis.
Upon reading, each object inside the parentheses becomes an element
of the list. That is, a cons cell is made for each element. The
@sc{car} of the cons cell points to the element, and its @sc{cdr} points
to the next cons cell of the list, which holds the next element in the
list. The @sc{cdr} of the last cons cell is set to point to @code{nil}.
@sc{car} slot of the cons cell points to the element, and its @sc{cdr}
slot points to the next cons cell of the list, which holds the next
element in the list. The @sc{cdr} slot of the last cons cell is set to
point to @code{nil}.
@cindex box diagrams, for lists
@cindex diagrams, boxed, for lists
A list can be illustrated by a diagram in which the cons cells are
shown as pairs of boxes. (The Lisp reader cannot read such an
illustration; unlike the textual notation, which can be understood by
both humans and computers, the box illustrations can be understood only
by humans.) The following represents the three-element list @code{(rose
violet buttercup)}:
shown as pairs of boxes, like dominoes. (The Lisp reader cannot read
such an illustration; unlike the textual notation, which can be
understood by both humans and computers, the box illustrations can be
understood only by humans.) This picture represents the three-element
list @code{(rose violet buttercup)}:
@example
@group
......@@ -608,18 +613,18 @@ violet buttercup)}:
@end group
@end example
In this diagram, each box represents a slot that can refer to any Lisp
In this diagram, each box represents a slot that can point to any Lisp
object. Each pair of boxes represents a cons cell. Each arrow is a
reference to a Lisp object, either an atom or another cons cell.
pointer to a Lisp object, either an atom or another cons cell.
In this example, the first box, the @sc{car} of the first cons cell,
refers to or ``contains'' @code{rose} (a symbol). The second box, the
@sc{cdr} of the first cons cell, refers to the next pair of boxes, the
second cons cell. The @sc{car} of the second cons cell refers to
@code{violet} and the @sc{cdr} refers to the third cons cell. The
@sc{cdr} of the third (and last) cons cell refers to @code{nil}.
In this example, the first box, which holds the @sc{car} of the first
cons cell, points to or ``contains'' @code{rose} (a symbol). The second
box, holding the @sc{cdr} of the first cons cell, points to the next
pair of boxes, the second cons cell. The @sc{car} of the second cons
cell is @code{violet}, and its @sc{cdr} is the third cons cell. The
@sc{cdr} of the third (and last) cons cell is @code{nil}.
Here is another diagram of the same list, @code{(rose violet
Here is another diagram of the same list, @code{(rose violet
buttercup)}, sketched in a different manner:
@smallexample
......@@ -683,13 +688,13 @@ that represents the @sc{car} and @sc{cdr} explicitly. In this syntax,
the object @var{a}, and whose @sc{cdr} is the object @var{b}. Dotted
pair notation is therefore more general than list syntax. In the dotted
pair notation, the list @samp{(1 2 3)} is written as @samp{(1 . (2 . (3
. nil)))}. For @code{nil}-terminated lists, the two notations produce
the same result, but list notation is usually clearer and more
convenient when it is applicable. When printing a list, the dotted pair
notation is only used if the @sc{cdr} of a cell is not a list.
. nil)))}. For @code{nil}-terminated lists, you can use either
notation, but list notation is usually clearer and more convenient.
When printing a list, the dotted pair notation is only used if the
@sc{cdr} of a cons cell is not a list.
Here's how box notation can illustrate dotted pairs. This example
shows the pair @code{(rose . violet)}:
Here's an example using boxes to illustrate dotted pair notation.
This example shows the pair @code{(rose . violet)}:
@example
@group
......@@ -702,10 +707,12 @@ shows the pair @code{(rose . violet)}:
@end group
@end example
Dotted pair notation can be combined with list notation to represent a
chain of cons cells with a non-@code{nil} final @sc{cdr}. For example,
@code{(rose violet . buttercup)} is equivalent to @code{(rose . (violet
. buttercup))}. The object looks like this:
You can combine dotted pair notation with list notation to represent
conveniently a chain of cons cells with a non-@code{nil} final @sc{cdr}.
You write a dot after the last element of the list, followed by the
@sc{cdr} of the final cons cell. For example, @code{(rose violet
. buttercup)} is equivalent to @code{(rose . (violet . buttercup))}.
The object looks like this:
@example
@group
......@@ -718,11 +725,12 @@ chain of cons cells with a non-@code{nil} final @sc{cdr}. For example,
@end group
@end example
These diagrams make it evident why @w{@code{(rose .@: violet .@:
buttercup)}} is invalid syntax; it would require a cons cell that has
three parts rather than two.
The syntax @code{(rose .@: violet .@: buttercup)} is invalid because
there is nothing that it could mean. If anything, it would say to put
@code{buttercup} in the @sc{cdr} of a cons cell whose @sc{cdr} is already
used for @code{violet}.
The list @code{(rose violet)} is equivalent to @code{(rose . (violet))}
The list @code{(rose violet)} is equivalent to @code{(rose . (violet))},
and looks like this:
@example
......@@ -783,7 +791,7 @@ functions that work on alists.
@subsection Array Type
An @dfn{array} is composed of an arbitrary number of slots for
referring to other Lisp objects, arranged in a contiguous block of
pointing to other Lisp objects, arranged in a contiguous block of
memory. Accessing any element of an array takes approximately the same
amount of time. In contrast, accessing an element of a list requires
time proportional to the position of the element in the list. (Elements
......@@ -883,8 +891,9 @@ character code, using a hex escape, @samp{\x@var{nnnnnnn}}, with as many
digits as necessary. (Multibyte non-@sc{ASCII} character codes are all
greater than 256.) Any character which is not a valid hex digit
terminates this construct. If the character that would follow is a hex
digit, write @w{@samp{\ }} to terminate the hex escape---for example,
@w{@samp{\x8c0\ }} represents one character, @samp{a} with grave accent.
digit, write @w{@samp{\ }} (backslash and space)
to terminate the hex escape---for example,
@w{@samp{\x8e0\ }} represents one character, @samp{a} with grave accent.
@w{@samp{\ }} in a string constant is just like backslash-newline; it does
not contribute any character to the string, but it does terminate the
preceding hex escape.
......@@ -914,7 +923,7 @@ distinguish case in @sc{ASCII} control characters.
Properly speaking, strings cannot hold meta characters; but when a
string is to be used as a key sequence, there is a special convention
that allows the meta versions of @sc{ASCII} characters to be put in a
that provides a way to represent meta versions of @sc{ASCII} characters in a
string. If you use the @samp{\M-} syntax to indicate a meta character
in a string constant, this sets the
@tex
......@@ -965,7 +974,7 @@ that range. For example,
represents a string whose textual contents are @samp{foo bar}, in which
the first three characters have a @code{face} property with value
@code{bold}, and the last three have a @code{face} property with value
@code{italic}. (The fourth character has no text properties so its
@code{italic}. (The fourth character has no text properties, so its
property list is @code{nil}. It is not actually necessary to mention
ranges with @code{nil} as the property list, since any characters not
mentioned in any range will default to having no properties.)
......@@ -1032,8 +1041,8 @@ that it begins with @samp{#&} followed by the length. The string
constant that follows actually specifies the contents of the bool-vector
as a bitmap---each ``character'' in the string contains 8 bits, which
specify the next 8 elements of the bool-vector (1 stands for @code{t},
and 0 for @code{nil}). The least significant bits of the character are
the lowest-numbered elements of the bool-vector. If the length is not a
and 0 for @code{nil}). The least significant bits of the character
correspond to the lowest indices in the bool-vector. If the length is not a
multiple of 8, the printed representation shows extra elements, but
these extras really make no difference.
......
......@@ -194,9 +194,10 @@ loads this @emph{before} the user's init file. You can inhibit the
loading of this file with the option @samp{-no-site-file}.
@defvar site-run-file
This variable specifies the site-customization file to load
before the user's init file. Its normal value is @code{"site-start"}.
(The only way to change it with real effect is before dumping Emacs.)
This variable specifies the site-customization file to load before the
user's init file. Its normal value is @code{"site-start"}. The only
way you can change it with real effect is to do so before dumping
Emacs.
@end defvar
If there is a great deal of code in your @file{.emacs} file, you
......
......@@ -512,7 +512,7 @@ is @code{nil}, the process will be deleted silently.
Otherwise, Emacs will query about killing it.
The value is @code{t} if the process was formerly set up to require
query. @code{nil} otherwise. A newly-created process always requires
query, @code{nil} otherwise. A newly-created process always requires
query.
@smallexample
......
......@@ -1200,7 +1200,7 @@ non-@code{nil}.
If @var{nosqueeze} is non-@code{nil}, that means to leave whitespace
other than line breaks untouched. If @var{to-eop} is non-@code{nil},
that means to keep filling to the end of the paragraph---or next hard
that means to keep filling to the end of the paragraph---or the next hard
newline, if @code{use-hard-newlines} is enabled (see below).
The variable @code{paragraph-separate} controls how to distinguish
......@@ -1243,7 +1243,7 @@ In an interactive call, any prefix argument requests justification.
If @var{nosqueeze} is non-@code{nil}, that means to leave whitespace
other than line breaks untouched. If @var{squeeze-after} is
non-@code{nil}, specifies a position in the region, and means don't
non-@code{nil}, it specifies a position in the region, and means don't
canonicalize spaces before that position.
In Adaptive Fill mode, this command calls @code{fill-context-prefix} to
......@@ -1434,15 +1434,16 @@ variables described below.
@defopt adaptive-fill-regexp
This variable holds a regular expression to control Adaptive Fill mode.
Whichever characters starting after the line's left margin match this
regular expression, those are the candidate for the fill prefix.
Adaptive Fill mode matches this regular expression against the text
starting after the left margin whitespace (if any) on a line; the
characters it matches are that line's candidate for the fill prefix.
@end defopt
@defopt adaptive-fill-first-line-regexp
In a one-line paragraph, if the candidate fill prefix matches
this regular expression, or if it matches @code{comment-start-skip},
then it is used---otherwise, it is replaced with an equivalent
number of spaces.
In a one-line paragraph, if the candidate fill prefix matches this
regular expression, or if it matches @code{comment-start-skip}, then it
is used---otherwise, spaces amounting to the same width are used
instead.
However, the fill prefix is never taken from a one-line paragraph
if it would act as a paragraph starter on subsequent lines.
......
......@@ -253,7 +253,7 @@ characters; see @ref{Display Tables}.
@deffn Command split-window-vertically size
This function splits the selected window into two windows, one above the
other, leaving the upper of the two window selected, with @var{size}
other, leaving the upper of the two windows selected, with @var{size}
lines. (If @var{size} is negative, then the lower of the two windows
gets @minus{} @var{size} lines and the upper window gets the rest, but
the upper window is still the one selected.)
......
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