Commit ec221d13 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

entered into RCS

parent a6b79478
......@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ The functions @code{float}, @code{truncate}, @code{floor}, @code{ceil},
The @code{format} function no longer handles the specifications
@samp{%e}, @samp{%f} and @samp{%g} for printing floating point numbers;
likewise for @code{message}.
@end bullet
@end itemize
@section Changes in Basic Editing Functions
......@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ friendly to process the files in any haphazard order.
@item
We eliminated the variables @code{write-contents-hooks} and
@code{local-write-file-hooks}.
@end bullet
@end itemize
@section Making Certain File Names ``Magic''
......@@ -238,9 +238,11 @@ are: @code{x-display-screens}, @code{x-server-version},
@code{x-display-visual-class}, @code{x-display-color-p}, and
@code{x-display-color-cells}.
@item
Additionally, we removed the variable @code{x-no-window-manager} and the
functions @code{x-synchronize} and @code{x-get-resource}.
@item
We didn't abolish @code{x-display-color-p}, but we renamed it to
@code{x-color-display-p}. We did abolish @code{x-color-defined-p}.
......@@ -383,7 +385,7 @@ with a keyboard was too confusing for too many users.
@item
Emacs 18 has no menu bars. All functions and variables related to the
menu bar have been eliminated.
@end bullet
@end itemize
@section Changes in Minibuffer Features
......@@ -401,7 +403,7 @@ minibuffer input functions can no longer be a cons cell
@item
In the function @code{read-no-blanks-input}, the @var{initial} argument
is no longer optional.
@end bullet
@end itemize
@section New Features for Defining Commands
......
......@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
@center @titlefont{GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}
@sp 5
@center GNU
@center Emacs Version 18
@center Emacs Version 19.25
@center for Unix Users
@sp 5
......
......@@ -1133,7 +1133,7 @@ but at least it is very unlikely.
to kill a temporary buffer. In this example, the value returned by
@code{unwind-protect} is used.
@example
@smallexample
(defun shell-command-string (cmd)
"Return the output of the shell command CMD, as a string."
(save-excursion
......@@ -1142,4 +1142,4 @@ to kill a temporary buffer. In this example, the value returned by
(unwind-protect
(buffer-string)
(kill-buffer (current-buffer)))))
@end example
@end smallexample
......@@ -1069,8 +1069,7 @@ by an alternative, equivalent specification.
Here is a table of the possibilities for @var{specification} and how each
directs processing of arguments.
@table @bullet
@table @asis
@item @code{t}
All arguments are instrumented for evaluation.
......
......@@ -18,9 +18,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 1}
@sp 2
......@@ -41,9 +41,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 2}
@sp 2
......@@ -72,9 +72,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 1}
@sp 2
......@@ -106,9 +106,9 @@
@end tex
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 1}
@sp 2
......@@ -137,9 +137,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 1}
@sp 2
......@@ -167,9 +167,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 2}
@sp 2
......@@ -197,9 +197,9 @@
@sp 1
@center @titlefont{Manual}
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 2}
@sp 2
......@@ -212,9 +212,9 @@
@w{@titlefont{The GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual --- Vol. 1}}
@sp 4
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 4
@center by Bil Lewis, Dan LaLiberte,
@center and the GNU Manual Group
......@@ -231,9 +231,9 @@
@w{@titlefont{The GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual --- Vol. 2}}
@sp 4
@center GNU Emacs Version 18
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Edition 1.05, April 1992
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 4
@center by Bil Lewis, Dan LaLiberte,
@center and the GNU Manual Group
......
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
@ifinfo
This version is the edition 2.3 of the GNU Emacs Lisp
Reference Manual. It corresponds to Emacs Version 19.23.
Reference Manual. It corresponds to Emacs Version 19.25.
@c Please REMEMBER to update edition number in *four* places in this file
@c and also in *one* place in intro.texi
......@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ instead of in the original English.
@c The edition number appears in several places in this file
@c and also in the file intro.texi.
@subtitle Second Edition, June 1993
@subtitle Revision 2.3, May 1994
@subtitle Revision 2.3, June 1994
@author by Bil Lewis, Dan LaLiberte, Richard Stallman
@author and the GNU Manual Group
......@@ -78,9 +78,9 @@ instead of in the original English.
Copyright @copyright{} 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@sp 2
Second Edition @*
Revised for Emacs Version 19.23,@*
May 1994.@*
Edition 2.3 @*
Revised for Emacs Version 19.25,@*
June, 1994.@*
@sp 2
ISBN 1-882114-40-X
......@@ -114,7 +114,7 @@ Cover art by Etienne Suvasa.
@ifinfo
This Info file contains edition 2.3 of the GNU Emacs Lisp
Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version 19.23.
Reference Manual, corresponding to GNU Emacs version 19.25.
@end ifinfo
@menu
......
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Second Edition, June 1993
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 1}
@sp 2
......@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@
@sp 2
@center GNU Emacs Version 19
@center for Unix Users
@center Second Edition, June 1993
@center Edition 2.3, June 1994
@sp 2
@center @titlefont{Volume 2}
@sp 2
......
......@@ -211,7 +211,7 @@ considered a list and @code{not} when it is considered a truth value
@end example
@end defun
@need 1000
@need 2000
@node List Elements
@section Accessing Elements of Lists
......@@ -1384,6 +1384,7 @@ the new alist without changing the old one.
(setq needles-per-cluster
'((2 . ("Austrian Pine" "Red Pine"))
(3 . ("Pitch Pine"))
@end group
(5 . ("White Pine"))))
@result{}
((2 "Austrian Pine" "Red Pine")
......@@ -1404,6 +1405,7 @@ the new alist without changing the old one.
@result{} nil
(cdr (car (cdr needles-per-cluster)))
@result{} ("Pitch Pine")
@group
(eq (cdr (car (cdr needles-per-cluster)))
(cdr (car (cdr copy))))
@result{} t
......
......@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ should not be used:
@cindex CL note---@samp{,}, @samp{,@@} as functions
@quotation
@b{Common Lisp note:} in Common Lisp, @samp{,} and @samp{,@@} are
@b{Common Lisp note:} In Common Lisp, @samp{,} and @samp{,@@} are
implemented as reader macros, so they do not require parentheses. In
Emacs Lisp they use function call syntax because reader macros are not
supported (for simplicity's sake).
......@@ -474,7 +474,7 @@ number of times:
local variable named @code{max} which the user does not expect. This
causes trouble in examples such as the following:
@example
@smallexample
@group
(let ((max 0))
(for x from 0 to 10 do
......@@ -482,7 +482,7 @@ causes trouble in examples such as the following:
(if (< max this)
(setq max this)))))
@end group
@end example
@end smallexample
@noindent
The references to @code{max} inside the body of the @code{for}, which
......
......@@ -441,7 +441,7 @@ This function is @emph{only} intended for interactive use.
This function sets the mark to @var{position}, and activates the mark.
The old value of the mark is @emph{not} pushed onto the mark ring.
@strong{Please note:} use this function only if you want the user to
@strong{Please note:} Use this function only if you want the user to
see that the mark has moved, and you want the previous mark position to
be lost. Normally, when a new mark is set, the old one should go on the
@code{mark-ring}. For this reason, most applications should use
......
......@@ -422,7 +422,7 @@ do such a thing.
@cindex CL note---case of letters
@quotation
@b{Common Lisp note:} in Common Lisp, lower case letters are always
@b{Common Lisp note:} In Common Lisp, lower case letters are always
``folded'' to upper case, unless they are explicitly escaped. This is
in contrast to Emacs Lisp, in which upper case and lower case letters
are distinct.
......
......@@ -626,8 +626,8 @@ A negative argument means move backward but still to a less deep spot.
@deffn Command down-list arg
This function moves forward into @var{arg} levels of parentheses. A
negative argument means move backward but still go @var{arg} levels
deeper in parentheses.
negative argument means move backward but still go
deeper in parentheses (@minus{}@var{arg} levels).
@end deffn
@deffn Command forward-sexp arg
......
......@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ However, this normally happens only as part of the abbrev mechanism
@cindex CL note---symbol in obarrays
@quotation
@b{Common Lisp note:} in Common Lisp, a single symbol may be interned in
@b{Common Lisp note:} In Common Lisp, a single symbol may be interned in
several obarrays.
@end quotation
......
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