Commit ec8a6295 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong
Browse files

Document some Emacs 23.3 changes in manuals.

* doc/emacs/macos.texi (Mac / GNUstep Basics): Document
ns-right-alternate-modifier.

* doc/lispref/numbers.texi (Float Basics): Document float-e and float-pi.

* doc/lispref/symbols.texi (Creating Symbols): Using unintern without an
obarray arg is now obsolete.

* doc/lispref/text.texi (Kill Functions, Kill Functions)
(Low-Level Kill Ring, Low-Level Kill Ring): Remove obsolete
YANK-HANDLER args.

* doc/lispref/variables.texi (Defining Variables): Change "pi" example to
"float-pi".
parent 8d7f026f
2010-11-20 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* macos.texi (Mac / GNUstep Basics): Document
ns-right-alternate-modifier.
2010-11-06 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* msdog.texi (Windows HOME): Add information regarding startup
......
......@@ -8,23 +8,22 @@
@cindex Macintosh
@cindex GNUstep
This section briefly describes the peculiarities of using Emacs built with
the GNUstep libraries on GNU/Linux or other operating systems, or on Mac OS X
with native window system support. For Mac OS X, Emacs can be built either
without window system support, with X11, or with the Cocoa interface. This
section only applies to the Cocoa build. Emacs 23 does not support Mac OS
Classic.
Emacs, when built on Mac OS X, uses the Cocoa application interface. For
various historical and technical reasons, Emacs uses the term @samp{Nextstep}
internally, instead of ``Cocoa'' or ``Mac OS X''; for instance, most of the
commands and variables described in the following sections begin with
@samp{ns-}, which is short for @samp{Nextstep}. NeXTstep was an application
interface released by NeXT Inc during the 1980s, of which Cocoa is a direct
descendant. Apart from Cocoa, there is another NeXTstep-style system:
GNUstep, which is free software. As of this writing, the GNUstep support is
alpha status (@pxref{GNUstep Support}), but we hope to improve it in the
future.
This section describes the peculiarities of using Emacs built with
the GNUstep libraries on GNU/Linux or other operating systems, or on
Mac OS X with native window system support. On Mac OS X, Emacs can be
built either without window system support, with X11, or with the
Cocoa interface; this section only applies to the Cocoa build. Emacs
does not support earlier versions of Mac OS.
For various historical and technical reasons, Emacs uses the term
@samp{Nextstep} internally, instead of ``Cocoa'' or ``Mac OS X''; for
instance, most of the commands and variables described in this section
begin with @samp{ns-}, which is short for @samp{Nextstep}. NeXTstep
was an application interface released by NeXT Inc during the 1980s, of
which Cocoa is a direct descendant. Apart from Cocoa, there is
another NeXTstep-style system: GNUstep, which is free software. As of
this writing, the GNUstep support is alpha status (@pxref{GNUstep
Support}), but we hope to improve it in the future.
@menu
* Mac / GNUstep Basics:: Basic Emacs usage under GNUstep or Mac OS.
......@@ -37,19 +36,24 @@ future.
@section Basic Emacs usage under Mac OS and GNUstep
By default, the @key{alt} and @key{option} keys are the same as
@key{Meta} when running under Mac OS. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the
same as @key{Super}, and Emacs provides a set of keybindings using
this modifier key that mimic other Mac / GNUstep applications (@pxref{Mac /
GNUstep Events}). You can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key
Bindings}).
The standard Mac / GNUstep font and color panels are accessible via Lisp commands.
To use the color panel, drag from it to an Emacs frame to change the
foreground color of the face at that position (if the @key{shift} key
is held down, it changes the background color instead). To discard the
settings, create a new frame and close the altered one.
@c [unclear if the following holds.]
@c To finalize the settings for either color or font, choose @samp{Save Options} in the @samp{Options} menu.
@key{Meta}. The Mac @key{Cmd} key is the same as @key{Super}, and
Emacs provides a set of keybindings using this modifier key that mimic
other Mac / GNUstep applications (@pxref{Mac / GNUstep Events}). You
can change these bindings in the usual way (@pxref{Key Bindings}).
The variable @code{ns-right-alternate-modifier} controls the
behavior of the right @key{alt} and @key{option} keys. These keys
behave like the left-hand keys if the value is @code{left} (the
default). A value of @code{control}, @code{meta}, @code{alt},
@code{super}, or @code{hyper} makes them behave like the corresponding
modifier keys; a value of @code{none} tells Emacs to ignore them.
The standard Mac / GNUstep font and color panels are accessible via
Lisp commands. To use the color panel, drag from it to an Emacs frame
to change the foreground color of the face at that position (if the
@key{shift} key is held down, it changes the background color
instead). To discard the settings, create a new frame and close the
altered one.
@key{S-Mouse-1} (i.e., clicking the left mouse button
while holding down the @key{Shift} key) adjusts the region to the
......@@ -58,7 +62,7 @@ it does not pop up a menu for changing the default face, as
@key{S-Mouse-1} normally does (@pxref{Temporary Face Changes}). This
change makes Emacs behave more like other Mac / GNUstep applications.
When you open or save files using the menus, or using the
When you open or save files using the menus, or using the
@key{Cmd-o} and @key{Cmd-S} bindings, Emacs uses graphical file
dialogs to read file names. However, if you use the regular Emacs key
sequences, such as @key{C-x C-f}, Emacs uses the minibuffer to read
......@@ -110,7 +114,7 @@ dragging will alter the foreground color. Shift dragging will alter the
background color.
@c To make the changes permanent select the "Save Options"
@c item in the "Options" menu, or run @code{menu-bar-options-save}.
@c item in the "Options" menu, or run @code{menu-bar-options-save}.
Useful in this context is the listing of all faces obtained by @key{M-x}
@code{list-faces-display}.
......@@ -193,7 +197,7 @@ font are stored in the variables @code{ns-input-font} and
@code{ns-input-fontsize}, respectively.
@item ns-power-off
This event occurs when the user logs out and Emacs is still running, or when
This event occurs when the user logs out and Emacs is still running, or when
`Quit Emacs' is chosen from the application menu.
The default behavior is to save all file-visiting buffers.
@end table
......@@ -208,26 +212,9 @@ and return the result as a string. You can also use the Lisp function
services and receive the results back. Note that you may need to
restart Emacs to access newly-available services.
@node GNUstep Support, , Mac / GNUstep Events, Mac OS / GNUstep
@section GNUstep Support
Emacs can be built and run under GNUstep, however there are still some
Emacs can be built and run under GNUstep, but there are still some
issues to be addressed. Interested developers should contact
@email{emacs-devel@@gnu.org}.
@c Presumably no longer relevant since CANNOT_DUMP removed 2009-05-06:
@ignore
In particular, it may be necessary to run @samp{make bootstrap} with a
plain X configuration, then @samp{make clean} and @samp{./configure
--with-ns} followed by @samp{make install}.
Currently CANNOT_DUMP is automatically enabled in GNUstep configurations,
because the unex file(s) for GNUstep, mainly @samp{unexelf.c}, have not been
updated yet with the ``zone'' code in and related to @samp{unexmacosx.c}.
@end ignore
@ignore
arch-tag: a822c2ab-4273-4997-927e-c153bb71dcf6
@end ignore
2010-11-20 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* text.texi (Kill Functions, Kill Functions)
(Low-Level Kill Ring, Low-Level Kill Ring): Remove obsolete
YANK-HANDLER args.
* symbols.texi (Creating Symbols): Using unintern without an
obarray arg is now obsolete.
* numbers.texi (Float Basics): Document float-e and float-pi.
* variables.texi (Defining Variables): Change "pi" example to
"float-pi".
2010-11-12 Eli Zaretskii <eliz@gnu.org>
* customize.texi (Composite Types): Lower-case index entry.
......
......@@ -224,6 +224,14 @@ down to an integer.
@end example
@end defun
@defvar float-e
The mathematical constant @math{e} (2.71828@dots{}).
@end defvar
@defvar float-pi
The mathematical constant @math{pi} (3.14159@dots{}).
@end defvar
@node Predicates on Numbers
@section Type Predicates for Numbers
@cindex predicates for numbers
......
......@@ -383,7 +383,7 @@ See @code{documentation} in @ref{Accessing Documentation}, for another
example using @code{mapatoms}.
@end defun
@defun unintern symbol &optional obarray
@defun unintern symbol obarray
This function deletes @var{symbol} from the obarray @var{obarray}. If
@code{symbol} is not actually in the obarray, @code{unintern} does
nothing. If @var{obarray} is @code{nil}, the current obarray is used.
......
......@@ -865,7 +865,7 @@ adds it to the most recent element. It determines automatically (using
@code{last-command}) whether the previous command was a kill command,
and if so appends the killed text to the most recent entry.
@deffn Command kill-region start end &optional yank-handler
@deffn Command kill-region start end
This function kills the text in the region defined by @var{start} and
@var{end}. The text is deleted but saved in the kill ring, along with
its text properties. The value is always @code{nil}.
......@@ -873,17 +873,10 @@ its text properties. The value is always @code{nil}.
In an interactive call, @var{start} and @var{end} are point and
the mark.
@c Emacs 19 feature
If the buffer or text is read-only, @code{kill-region} modifies the kill
ring just the same, then signals an error without modifying the buffer.
This is convenient because it lets the user use a series of kill
commands to copy text from a read-only buffer into the kill ring.
If @var{yank-handler} is non-@code{nil}, this puts that value onto
the string of killed text, as a @code{yank-handler} text property.
@xref{Yanking}. Note that if @var{yank-handler} is @code{nil}, any
@code{yank-handler} properties present on the killed text are copied
onto the kill ring, like other text properties.
@end deffn
@defopt kill-read-only-ok
......@@ -1068,7 +1061,7 @@ it returns the entry pointed at by the yanking pointer and does not
move the yanking pointer.
@end defun
@defun kill-new string &optional replace yank-handler
@defun kill-new string &optional replace
This function pushes the text @var{string} onto the kill ring and
makes the yanking pointer point to it. It discards the oldest entry
if appropriate. It also invokes the value of
......@@ -1077,25 +1070,15 @@ if appropriate. It also invokes the value of
If @var{replace} is non-@code{nil}, then @code{kill-new} replaces the
first element of the kill ring with @var{string}, rather than pushing
@var{string} onto the kill ring.
If @var{yank-handler} is non-@code{nil}, this puts that value onto
the string of killed text, as a @code{yank-handler} property.
@xref{Yanking}. Note that if @var{yank-handler} is @code{nil}, then
@code{kill-new} copies any @code{yank-handler} properties present on
@var{string} onto the kill ring, as it does with other text properties.
@end defun
@defun kill-append string before-p &optional yank-handler
@defun kill-append string before-p
This function appends the text @var{string} to the first entry in the
kill ring and makes the yanking pointer point to the combined entry.
Normally @var{string} goes at the end of the entry, but if
@var{before-p} is non-@code{nil}, it goes at the beginning. This
function also invokes the value of @code{interprogram-cut-function}
(see below). This handles @var{yank-handler} just like
@code{kill-new}, except that if @var{yank-handler} is different from
the @code{yank-handler} property of the first entry of the kill ring,
@code{kill-append} pushes the concatenated string onto the kill ring,
instead of replacing the original first entry with it.
(see below).
@end defun
@defvar interprogram-paste-function
......
......@@ -544,21 +544,23 @@ not the buffer-local value. (But you should not be making
buffer-local bindings for a symbol that is defined with
@code{defconst}.)
Here, @code{pi} is a constant that presumably ought not to be changed
by anyone (attempts by the Indiana State Legislature notwithstanding).
As the second form illustrates, however, this is only advisory.
An example of the use of @code{defconst} is Emacs' definition of
@code{float-pi}---the mathematical constant @math{pi}, which ought not
to be changed by anyone (attempts by the Indiana State Legislature
notwithstanding). As the second form illustrates, however,
@code{defconst} is only advisory.
@example
@group
(defconst pi 3.1415 "Pi to five places.")
@result{} pi
(defconst float-pi 3.141592653589793 "The value of Pi.")
@result{} float-pi
@end group
@group
(setq pi 3)
@result{} pi
(setq float-pi 3)
@result{} float-pi
@end group
@group
pi
float-pi
@result{} 3
@end group
@end example
......
......@@ -26,9 +26,6 @@ used on x86-64 and s390x GNU/Linux architectures.
* Changes in Emacs 23.3
** The nextstep port can have different modifiers for the left and right
alt/option key by customizing the value for ns-right-alternate-modifier.
* Editing Changes in Emacs 23.3
......@@ -82,10 +79,12 @@ produce an up to date diff.
* New Modes and Packages in Emacs 23.3
** smie.el is a generic navigation and indentation engine.
It takes a simple BNF description of the grammar, and provides both
sexp-style navigation (jumping over begin..end pairs) as well as
indentation, which can be adjusted via ad-hoc indentation rules.
* Incompatible Lisp Changes in Emacs 23.3
......@@ -96,16 +95,28 @@ starting from the first line of text below the header line.
* Lisp changes in Emacs 23.3
+++
** `e' and `pi' are now called `float-e' and `float-pi'.
The old names are obsolete.
** The use of unintern without an obarray arg is declared obsolete.
** The function `princ-list' is declared obsolete.
** The yank-handler argument to kill-region and friends is declared obsolete.
+++
** The use of unintern without an obarray arg is now obsolete.
---
** The function `princ-list' is now obsolete.
+++
** The yank-handler argument to kill-region and friends is now obsolete.
** New function byte-to-string, like char-to-string but for bytes.
* Changes in Emacs 23.3 on non-free operating systems
+++
** The nextstep port can have different modifiers for the left and right
alt/option key by customizing the value for ns-right-alternate-modifier.
* Installation Changes in Emacs 23.2
......
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