Commit ece4bae5 authored by Glenn Morris's avatar Glenn Morris

Doc, comment, etc updates for increased use of locate-user-emacs-file

This should have been a prerequisite for making these changes in the
first place.

* doc/emacs/calendar.texi (Time Intervals):
* doc/misc/idlwave.texi (Lesson III---User Catalog, Online Help)
(Starting the Shell, Catalogs, User Catalog):
* doc/misc/remember.texi (Quick Start):
* doc/misc/viper.texi:
* doc/misc/vip.texi (Customization, Customizing Constants)
(Customizing Key Bindings): Update for files being in ~/.emacs.d/.

* lisp/ido.el (ido-save-directory-list-file):
* lisp/saveplace.el (save-place-file):
* lisp/calendar/timeclock.el (timeclock-file):
* lisp/net/quickurl.el (quickurl-url-file):
* lisp/obsolete/otodo-mode.el (todo-file-do, todo-file-done, todo-file-top):
* lisp/progmodes/idlwave.el (idlwave-config-directory):
* lisp/textmodes/remember.el (remember-data-file):
Bump :version.

* lisp/shadowfile.el (shadow-info-file, shadow-todo-file): Doc fix.
* lisp/strokes.el (strokes-file): Doc fix.  Bump :version.
(strokes-help): Doc fix.
* lisp/emulation/viper-init.el (viper-vi-style-in-minibuffer): Doc fix.
* lisp/emulation/viper.el (viper): Doc fix for custom group.
(top-level): Remove oh-so-no-longer-relevant text about vip.
* lisp/obsolete/otodo-mode.el (todo-prefix): Doc fix.

* etc/NEWS: Related edits.
parent 6ea71a44
2014-01-27 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* calendar.texi (Time Intervals): Update for files in ~/.emacs.d/.
2014-01-26 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* ack.texi (Acknowledgments):
......
......@@ -1616,11 +1616,11 @@ you. You can, however, customize the value of the variable
then, only an explicit @kbd{M-x timeclock-out} or @kbd{M-x
timeclock-change} will tell Emacs that the current interval is over.
@cindex @file{.timelog} file
@cindex @file{timelog} file
@vindex timeclock-file
@findex timeclock-reread-log
The timeclock functions work by accumulating the data in a file
called @file{.timelog} in your home directory. You can specify a
called @file{~/.emacs.d/timelog}. You can specify a
different name for this file by customizing the variable
@code{timeclock-file}. If you edit the timeclock file manually, or if
you change the value of any of timeclock's customizable variables, you
......
2014-01-27 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* idlwave.texi (Lesson III---User Catalog, Online Help)
(Starting the Shell, Catalogs, User Catalog):
* remember.texi (Quick Start):
* viper.texi:
* vip.texi (Customization, Customizing Constants)
(Customizing Key Bindings): Update for files being in ~/.emacs.d/.
2014-01-25 Xue Fuqiao <xfq.free@gmail.com>
* cc-mode.texi (Minor Modes): Minor fix.
......
......@@ -689,8 +689,8 @@ you want; directories with existing library catalogs will not be
selected by default) and click on the @samp{Scan&Save} button. Then
go for a cup of coffee while IDLWAVE collects information for each and
every IDL routine on your search path. All this information is
written to the file @file{.idlwave/idlusercat.el} in your home
directory and will from now on automatically load whenever you use
written to the file @file{~/.emacs.d/idlwave/idlusercat.el}
and will from now on automatically load whenever you use
IDLWAVE@. You may find it necessary to rebuild the catalog on occasion
as your local libraries change, or build a library catalog for those
directories instead. Invoke routine info (@kbd{C-c ?}) or completion
......@@ -1262,7 +1262,7 @@ directly with IDL, along with an XML-based catalog of routine
information. By default, IDLWAVE automatically attempts to convert this
XML catalog into a format Emacs can more easily understand, and caches
this information in your @code{idlwave_config_directory}
(@file{~/.idlwave/}, by default). It also re-scans the XML catalog if
(@file{~/.emacs.d/idlwave/}, by default). It also re-scans the XML catalog if
it is newer than the current cached version. You can force rescan with
the menu entry @code{IDLWAVE->Routine Info->Rescan XML Help Catalog}.
......@@ -2466,7 +2466,7 @@ Initial commands, separated by newlines, to send to IDL.
Non-@code{nil} means preserve command history between sessions.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-shell-command-history-file (@file{~/.idlwave/.idlwhist})
@defopt idlwave-shell-command-history-file (@file{~/.emacs.d/idlwave/.idlwhist})
The file in which the command history of the idlwave shell is saved.
Unless it's an absolute path, it goes in
@code{idlwave-config-directory}.
......@@ -3518,7 +3518,7 @@ information (e.g., Windows), a library path must be specified in
to setup directories for user catalog scan (@pxref{User Catalog} for
more on this variable). Note that, before the shell is running, IDLWAVE
can only know about the IDL search path by consulting the file pointed
to by @code{idlwave-path-file} (@file{~/.idlwave/idlpath.el}, by
to by @code{idlwave-path-file} (@file{~/.emacs.d/idlwave/idlpath.el}, by
default). If @code{idlwave-auto-write-path} is enabled (which is the
default), the paths are written out whenever the IDLWAVE shell is
started.
......@@ -3540,7 +3540,7 @@ locating HTML help and the IDL Assistant for IDL v6.2 and later. Under
Unix/MacOSX, will be obtained from the Shell and recorded, if run.
@end defopt
@defopt idlwave-config-directory (@file{~/.idlwave})
@defopt idlwave-config-directory (@file{~/.emacs.d/idlwave})
Default path where IDLWAVE saves configuration information, a user
catalog (if any), and a cached scan of the XML catalog (IDL v6.2 and
later).
......@@ -3629,7 +3629,7 @@ performance is a problem and/or the catalogs are not needed.
The user catalog is the old routine catalog system. It is produced
within Emacs, and stored in a single file in the user's home directory
(@file{.idlwave/idlusercat.el} by default). Although library catalogs
(@file{.emacs.d/idlwave/idlusercat.el} by default). Although library catalogs
are more flexible, there may be reasons to prefer a user catalog
instead, including:
......
......@@ -203,7 +203,7 @@ Type @kbd{C-c C-c} (@code{remember-finalize}) to save the note and close
the @samp{*Remember*} buffer.
@end itemize
By default, @code{remember-finalize} saves the note in @file{~/.notes}.
By default, @code{remember-finalize} saves the note in @file{~/emacs.d/notes}.
You can edit it now to see the remembered and timestamped note. You
can edit this file however you want. New entries will always be added
to the end.
......@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ remember} displays a @samp{*Remember*} buffer with the region as the
initial contents.
As a simple beginning, you can start by using the Text File backend,
keeping your @file{~/.notes} file in outline-mode format, with a final
keeping your @file{~/.emacs.d/notes} file in outline-mode format, with a final
entry called @samp{* Raw data}. Remembered data will be added to the
end of the file. Every so often, you can move the data that gets
appended there into other files, or reorganize your document.
......
......@@ -1863,7 +1863,7 @@ The following Ex commands are available in Vi, but not implemented in VIP.
@node Customization
@chapter Customization
If you have a file called @file{.vip} in your home directory, then it
If you have a file called @file{~/.emacs.d/vip} (or @file{~/.vip}), then it
will also be loaded when VIP is loaded. This file is thus useful for
customizing VIP.
......@@ -1903,7 +1903,7 @@ if @code{nil} then it sis bound to @code{delete-backward-char}.
@end table
@noindent
You can reset these constants in VIP by the Ex command @kbd{set}. Or you
can include a line like this in your @file{.vip} file:
can include a line like this in your @file{~/.emacs.d/vip} file:
@example
(setq vip-case-fold-search t)
@end example
......@@ -1916,8 +1916,8 @@ can include a line like this in your @file{.vip} file:
VIP uses @code{vip-command-mode-map} as the @dfn{local keymap} for vi mode.
For example, in vi mode, @key{SPC} is bound to the function
@code{vip-scroll}. But, if you wish to make @key{SPC} and some other keys
behave like Vi, you can include the following lines in your @file{.vip}
file.
behave like Vi, you can include the following lines in your
@file{~/.emacs.d/vip} file.
@example
(define-key vip-command-mode-map "\C-g" 'vip-info-on-file)
......
......@@ -170,8 +170,8 @@ world of Vi! These users are well familiar with Emacs bindings and prefer them
in some cases, especially in the Vi Insert state. John Hawkins
<jshawkin@@eecs.umich.edu> has provided a set of customizations, which
enables additional Emacs bindings under Viper. These customizations can be
included in your @file{~/.viper} file and are found at the following URL:
@file{http://traeki.freeshell.org/files/viper-sample}.
included in your @file{~/.emacs.d/viper} file and are found at the
following URL: @file{http://traeki.freeshell.org/files/viper-sample}.
@menu
* Emacs Preliminaries:: Basic concepts in Emacs.
......@@ -329,14 +329,14 @@ the place where all general Emacs customization takes place. Beginning with
version 20.0, Emacsen have an interactive interface, which simplifies the
job of customization significantly.
Viper also uses the file @file{~/.viper} for Viper-specific customization.
Viper also uses the file @file{~/.emacs.d/viper} for Viper-specific customization.
The location of Viper customization file can be changed by setting the
variable @code{viper-custom-file-name} in @file{.emacs} @emph{prior} to loading
Viper.
The latest versions of Emacs have an interactive customization facility,
which allows you to (mostly) bypass the use of the @file{.emacs} and
@file{.viper} files. You can reach this customization
@code{viper-custom-file-name} files. You can reach this customization
facility from within Viper's VI state by executing the Ex command
@kbd{:customize}.
......@@ -611,8 +611,8 @@ is slightly different from other programs. It is designed to minimize the
need for deleting file names that Emacs provides in its prompts. (This is
usually convenient, but occasionally the prompt may suggest a wrong file
name for you.) If you see a prompt @kbd{/usr/foo/} and you wish to edit the
file @kbd{~/.viper}, you don't have to erase the prompt. Instead, simply
continue typing what you need. Emacs will interpret @kbd{/usr/foo/~/.viper}
file @kbd{~/.file}, you don't have to erase the prompt. Instead, simply
continue typing what you need. Emacs will interpret @kbd{/usr/foo/~/.file}
correctly. Similarly, if the prompt is @kbd{~/foo/} and you need to get to
@kbd{/bar/file}, keep typing. Emacs interprets @kbd{~/foo//bar/} as
@kbd{/bar/file}, since when it sees @samp{//}, it understands that
......@@ -795,8 +795,8 @@ between the Vi state and Insert state at will, and even use the replace mode.
Initially, the minibuffer comes up in Insert state.
Some users prefer plain Emacs bindings in the minibuffer. To this end, set
@code{viper-vi-style-in-minibuffer} to @code{nil} in @file{.viper}.
@xref{Customization}, to learn how to do this.
@code{viper-vi-style-in-minibuffer} to @code{nil} in
your Viper customization file. @xref{Customization}, to learn how to do this.
When the minibuffer changes Viper states, you will notice that the appearance
of the text there changes as well. This is useful because the minibuffer
......@@ -989,8 +989,8 @@ In the Overview chapter, some Multiple File issues were discussed
(@pxref{Multiple Files in Viper}). In addition to the files, Emacs has
buffers. These can be seen in the @kbd{:args} list and switched using
@kbd{:next} if you type @kbd{:set ex-cycle-through-non-files t}, or
specify @code{(setq ex-cycle-through-non-files t)} in your @file{.viper}
file. @xref{Customization}, for details.
specify @code{(setq ex-cycle-through-non-files t)} in your
Viper customization file. @xref{Customization}, for details.
@node Undo and Backups
@section Undo and Backups
......@@ -1132,7 +1132,8 @@ of the form @kbd{/foo//bar} as @kbd{/bar} and @kbd{/foo/~/bar} as
@cindex word search
Viper provides buffer search, the ability to search the buffer for a region
under the cursor. You have to turn this on in @file{.viper} either by calling
under the cursor. You have to turn this on in your Viper customization file
either by calling
@example
(viper-buffer-search-enable)
......@@ -1182,10 +1183,10 @@ variable that controls how search patterns are highlighted is
@end example
@vindex @code{viper-search-face}
@noindent
in @file{~/.viper}. If you want to change how patterns are highlighted, you
will have to change @code{viper-search-face} to your liking. The easiest
way to do this is to use Emacs customization widget, which is accessible
from the menubar. Viper customization group is located under the
in your Viper customization file. If you want to change how patterns are
highlighted, you will have to change @code{viper-search-face} to your liking.
The easiest way to do this is to use Emacs customization widget, which is
accessible from the menubar. Viper customization group is located under the
@emph{Emulations} customization group, which in turn is under the
@emph{Editing} group (or simply by typing @kbd{:customize}). All Viper
faces are grouped together under Viper's
......@@ -1225,8 +1226,8 @@ Facilities like this make Vi's @kbd{:ab} command obsolete.
Viper can be set free from the line--limited movements in Vi, such as @kbd{l}
refusing to move beyond the line, @key{ESC} moving one character back,
etc. These derive from Ex, which is a line editor. If your @file{.viper}
contains
etc. These derive from Ex, which is a line editor. If your
Viper customization file contains
@example
@code{(setq viper-ex-style-motion nil)}
......@@ -1306,9 +1307,10 @@ These two keys invoke many important Emacs functions. For example, if you
hit @kbd{C-x} followed by @kbd{2}, then the current window will be split
into 2. Except for novice users, @kbd{C-c} is also set to execute an Emacs
command from the current major mode. @key{ESC} will do the same, if you
configure @key{ESC} as Meta by setting @code{viper-no-multiple-ESC} to @code{nil}
in @file{.viper}. @xref{Customization}. @kbd{C-\} in Insert, Replace, or Vi
states will make Emacs think @kbd{Meta} has been hit.
configure @key{ESC} as Meta by setting @code{viper-no-multiple-ESC} to
@code{nil} in your Viper customization file. @xref{Customization}.
@kbd{C-\} in Insert, Replace, or Vi states will make Emacs think
@kbd{Meta} has been hit.
@item \
@kindex @kbd{\}
Escape to Emacs to execute a single Emacs command. For instance,
......@@ -1574,9 +1576,9 @@ Customization can be done in 2 ways.
@item
@cindex initialization
@cindex .viper
Elisp code in a @file{.viper} file in your home directory. Viper
loads @file{.viper} just before it does the binding for mode
hooks. This is recommended for experts only.
Elisp code in a @file{~/.emacs.d/viper} (or @file{~/.viper}) file.
Viper loads this file just before it does the binding for mode hooks.
This is recommended for experts only.
@item
@cindex .emacs
Elisp code in your @file{.emacs} file before and after the @code{(require
......@@ -1591,12 +1593,12 @@ customization widget, which lets you change the values of Viper
customizable variables easily. This method is good for novice and
experts alike. The customization code in the form of Lisp commands will be
placed in @file{~/.emacs} or some other customization file depending on the
version of Emacs that you use. Still, it is recommended to separate
version of Emacs that you use. Still, it is recommended to separate
Viper-related customization produced by the Emacs customization widget
and keep it in the @file{.viper} file.
and keep it in your Viper customization file.
Some advanced customization cannot be accomplished this way, however, and
has to be done in Emacs Lisp in the @file{.viper} file. For the common
has to be done in Emacs Lisp in your Viper customization file. For the common
cases, examples are provided that you can use directly.
@end itemize
......@@ -1753,10 +1755,10 @@ cases. @code{nil} means you either has to invoke @code{viper-mode} manually
for each buffer (or you can add @code{viper-mode} to the appropriate major mode
hooks using @code{viper-load-hook}).
This option must be set in the file @file{~/.viper}.
@item viper-custom-file-name "~/.viper"
This option must be set in your Viper customization file.
@item viper-custom-file-name "~/.emacs.d/viper"
File used for Viper-specific customization.
Change this setting, if you want. Must be set in @file{.emacs} (not @file{.viper}!)
Change this setting, if you want. Must be set in @file{.emacs}
before Viper is loaded. Note that you
have to set it as a string inside double quotes.
@item viper-spell-function 'ispell-region
......@@ -1807,8 +1809,8 @@ Both these macros are bound (as Viper macros) to
@code{viper-repeat-from-history},
which checks the second key by which it is invoked to see which of the
previous commands to invoke. Viper binds @kbd{f12 1} and @kbd{f12 2} only,
but the user can bind more in @file{~/.viper}. @xref{Vi Macros}, for how to do
this.
but the user can bind more in his/her Viper customization file.
@xref{Vi Macros}, for how to do this.
@item viper-keep-point-on-undo nil
If not @code{nil}, Viper tries to not move point when undoing commands.
Instead, it will briefly move the cursor to the place where change has
......@@ -1873,7 +1875,7 @@ emulate the standard Vi behavior, which supports only intra-line
replacement regions (and multi-line replacement regions are deleted).
@item viper-toggle-key "\C-z"
Specifies the key used to switch from Emacs to Vi and back.
Must be set in @file{.viper}. This variable can't be
Must be set in your Viper customization file. This variable can't be
changed interactively after Viper is loaded.
In Insert state, this key acts as a temporary escape to Vi state, i.e., it
......@@ -1906,7 +1908,7 @@ the last chance to do customization before Viper is up and running.
@noindent
You can reset some of these constants in Viper with the Ex command @kbd{:set}
(when so indicated in the table). Or you
can include a line like this in your @file{.viper} file:
can include a line like this in your Viper customization file:
@example
(setq viper-case-fold-search t)
@end example
......@@ -2018,7 +2020,7 @@ state.
If you want to
bind a key, say @kbd{C-v}, to the function that scrolls
page down and to make @kbd{0} display information on the current buffer,
putting this in @file{.viper} will do the trick in Vi state:
putting this in your Viper customization file will do the trick in Vi state:
@example
(define-key viper-vi-global-user-map "\C-v" 'scroll-down)
@end example
......@@ -2067,11 +2069,12 @@ keys necessary in that keymap, and put
@end example
@noindent
in @file{~/.viper}. To do the same in Vi and Insert states, you should use
@code{vi-state} and @code{insert-state}. Changes in Insert state are also
in effect in Replace state. For instance, suppose that the user wants to
use @kbd{dd} in Vi state under Dired mode to delete files, @kbd{u} to unmark
files, etc. The following code in @file{~/.viper} will then do the job:
in your Viper customization file. To do the same in Vi and Insert states, you
should use @code{vi-state} and @code{insert-state}. Changes in Insert state
are also in effect in Replace state. For instance, suppose that the user wants
to use @kbd{dd} in Vi state under Dired mode to delete files, @kbd{u} to unmark
files, etc. The following code in the Viper customization file will then do
the job:
@example
(setq my-dired-modifier-map (make-sparse-keymap))
......@@ -2275,7 +2278,7 @@ can happen only in the beginning, when the minor mode kicks in. Typing
several such minor modes and takes care of them, so the above trick
is usually not necessary. If you find that some minor mode, e.g.,
@code{nasty-mode} interferes with Viper, putting the following in
@file{.viper} should fix the problem:
your Viper customization file should fix the problem:
@lisp
(viper-harness-minor-mode "nasty-mode")
@end lisp
......@@ -2332,8 +2335,8 @@ document. Other features are explained here.
@item viper-buffer-search-char nil
Enable buffer search. Explicit call to @code{viper-buffer-search-enable}
sets @code{viper-buffer-search-char} to @kbd{g}. Alternatively, the user can
set @code{viper-buffer-search-char} in @file{.viper} to a key sequence
to be used for buffer search. There is no need to call
set @code{viper-buffer-search-char} in his/her Viper customization file to a key
sequence to be used for buffer search. There is no need to call
@code{viper-buffer-search-enable} in that case.
@findex @code{viper-buffer-search-enable}
@vindex @code{viper-buffer-search-char}
......@@ -2356,8 +2359,8 @@ If you hit something other than @kbd{/} after the first @kbd{/} or if the
second @kbd{/} doesn't follow quickly enough, then Viper will issue the
usual prompt @kbd{/} and will wait for input, as usual in Vi.
If you don't like this behavior, you can ``unrecord'' these macros in your
@file{~/.viper} file. For instance, if you don't like the above feature, put
this in @file{~/.viper}:
Viper customization file. For instance, if you don't like the above
feature, put this in the file:
@example
(viper-set-searchstyle-toggling-macros 'undefine)
@end example
......@@ -2444,7 +2447,7 @@ the direction of newer insertions. Hitting @kbd{C-c M-p} or @kbd{C-c M-n}
in succession
will undo the previous insertion from the ring and insert the next item on
the ring. If a larger ring size is needed, change the value of the above
variable in the @file{~/.viper} file.
variable in the Viper customization file.
Since typing these sequences of keys may be tedious, it is suggested that the
user should bind a function key, such as @kbd{f31}, as follows:
......@@ -2515,7 +2518,7 @@ putting
(copy-face 'default 'viper-minibuffer-insert-face)
(copy-face 'default 'viper-minibuffer-emacs-face)
@end example
in the @file{~/.viper} file or through the customization widget, as
in their Viper customization file or through the customization widget, as
described above. However, in that case, the user will not have any
indication of the current Viper state in the minibuffer. (This is important
if the user accidentally switches to another Viper state by typing @key{ESC} or
......@@ -2587,8 +2590,8 @@ Note: while loading initially, Viper binds this mouse action only if it is
not already bound to something else. If you want to use the mouse-search
feature, and the @kbd{Meta-Shift-Mouse-1} mouse action is already bound to
something else, you can rebind the mouse-search feature by setting
@code{viper-mouse-search-key} to something else in your @code{~/.viper}
file:
@code{viper-mouse-search-key} to something else in
your Viper customization file:
@lisp
(setq viper-mouse-search-key '(meta 1))
@end lisp
......@@ -2600,7 +2603,8 @@ Meta key and clicking mouse button 1. The allowed values of
If the requested mouse action (e.g., (meta 1)) is already taken for other
purposes then you have to confirm your intention by placing the following
command in @code{~/.viper} after setting @code{viper-mouse-search-key}:
command in your Viper customization file after setting
@code{viper-mouse-search-key}:
@lisp
(viper-bind-mouse-search-key 'force)
@end lisp
......@@ -2642,13 +2646,13 @@ case of a triple-click, the prefix argument is ignored.)
Note: while loading initially, Viper binds this mouse action only if it not
already bound to something else. If you want to use this feature and the
default mouse action is already bound, you can rebind mouse-insert by
placing this command in @code{~/.viper}:
placing this command in your Viper customization file:
@lisp
(setq viper-mouse-insert-key '(meta 2))
@end lisp
If you want to bind mouse-insert to an action even if this action is
already taken for other purposes in Emacs, then you should add this command
to @code{~/.viper}, after setting @code{viper-mouse-insert-key}:
to your Viper customization file, after setting @code{viper-mouse-insert-key}:
@lisp
(viper-bind-mouse-insert-key 'force)
@end lisp
......@@ -2785,7 +2789,7 @@ Manual}.
When the user finishes defining a macro (which is done by typing @kbd{C-x)},
a departure from Vi), you will be asked whether you want this
macro to be global, mode-specific, or buffer-specific. You will also be
given a chance to save the macro in your @file{~/.viper} file.
given a chance to save the macro in your Viper customization file.
This is the easiest way to save a macro and make
it permanently available. If you work your startup files with bare hands,
here is how Viper saves the above macro so that it will be
......@@ -2834,8 +2838,8 @@ the latter says that the macro is to be defined for all buffers
For convenience, Viper also lets you define Vi-style macros in its Emacs
state. There is no Ex command, like @kbd{:map} and @kbd{:map!} for doing
this, but the user can include such a macro in the @file{~/.viper} file. The
only thing is that the @code{viper-record-kbd-macro} command should specify
this, but the user can include such a macro in the Viper customization file.
The only thing is that the @code{viper-record-kbd-macro} command should specify
@code{emacs-state} instead of @code{vi-state} or @code{insert-state}.
The user can get rid of a macro either by using the Ex commands @kbd{:unmap}
......@@ -2899,8 +2903,9 @@ Vi and Emacs commands, so that you could see what will happen each time the
macro is executed. Suppose now we wanted to bind the key sequence
@kbd{f13 f13} to the command @code{eval-last-sexp}. To accomplish this, we
can type @kbd{M-x eval-last-sexp} followed by @kbd{C-x )}.
If you answer positively to Viper's offer to save this macro in @file{~/.viper}
for future uses, the following will be inserted in that file:
If you answer positively to Viper's offer to save this macro in your
Viper customization file for future uses, the following will be inserted
in that file:
@example
(viper-record-kbd-macro [f16 f16] 'vi-state
......@@ -2972,8 +2977,8 @@ The rate at which the user must type keys in order for them to be
recognized as a timeout macro is controlled by the variable
@code{viper-fast-keyseq-timeout}, which defaults to 200 milliseconds.
For the most part, Viper macros defined in @file{~/.viper} can be shared
between X and TTY modes.
For the most part, Viper macros defined in the Viper customization file can
be shared between X and TTY modes.
The problem with TTY may be that the function keys there generate sequences
of events instead of a single event (as under a window system).
Emacs maps some of these sequences back to the logical keys
......@@ -3359,7 +3364,8 @@ this function.
Find the next bracket/parenthesis/brace and go to its match.
By default, Viper ignores brackets/parentheses/braces that occur inside
parentheses. You can change this by setting
@code{viper-parse-sexp-ignore-comments} to @code{nil} in your @file{.viper} file.
@code{viper-parse-sexp-ignore-comments} to @code{nil} in your Viper
customization file.
This option can also be toggled interactively if you quickly hit @kbd{%%%}.
This latter feature is implemented as a vi-style keyboard macro. If you
......@@ -3370,7 +3376,7 @@ don't want this macro, put
@end example
@findex @code{viper-set-parsing-style-toggling-macro}
in your @file{~/.viper} file.
in your Viper customization file.
@end table
@kindex @kbd{%}
......@@ -3544,7 +3550,7 @@ then be executed by typing `@kbd{.}'.
Since typing the above sequences of keys may be tedious, the
functions doing the perusing can be bound to unused keyboard keys in the
@file{~/.viper} file. @xref{Viper Specials}, for details.
Viper customization file. @xref{Viper Specials}, for details.
@end table
@kindex @kbd{C-c M-p}
@kindex @kbd{C-c M-n}
......@@ -3984,7 +3990,7 @@ Write the file. Viper makes sure that a final newline is always added to
any file where this newline is missing. This is done by setting Emacs
variable @code{require-final-newline} to @code{t}. If you don't like this
feature, use @code{setq-default} to set @code{require-final-newline} to
@code{nil}. This must be done in @file{.viper} file.
@code{nil}. This must be done in the Viper customization file.
@item :[x,y] w <name>
Write to the file <name>.
@item :[x,y] w>> <name>
......
......@@ -320,6 +320,7 @@ copy of each repeated line. The lines need not be sorted.
* Changes in Specialized Modes and Packages in Emacs 24.4
+++
** More packages look for ~/.emacs.d/<foo> additionally to ~/.<foo>.
Affected files:
~/.emacs.d/timelog replaces ~/.timelog
......@@ -328,7 +329,7 @@ Affected files:
~/.emacs.d/ido.last replaces ~/.ido.last
~/.emacs.d/kkcrc replaces ~/.kkcrc
~/.emacs.d/quickurls replaces ~/.quickurls
~/.emacs.d/idlwave replaces ~/.idlwave
~/.emacs.d/idlwave/ replaces ~/.idlwave/
~/.emacs.d/bdfcache.el replaces ~/.bdfcache.el
~/.emacs.d/places replaces ~/.emacs-places
~/.emacs.d/shadows replaces ~/.shadows
......@@ -353,14 +354,11 @@ you access lexical variables.
*** New minor mode `jit-lock-debug-mode' lets you use the debuggers on
code run via JIT Lock.
** Battery
---
*** Battery information via the BSD `apm' utility is now supported.
** Battery information can now be retrieved from BSD's `apm' utility.
** Buffer Menu
*** `M-s a C-o' shows lines matching a regexp in marked buffers using Occur.
---
** In the Buffer Menu, `M-s a C-o' shows matches for a regexp in marked buffers.
** Calendar and Diary
......
2014-01-27 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* shadowfile.el (shadow-info-file, shadow-todo-file): Doc fix.
* strokes.el (strokes-file): Doc fix. Bump :version.
(strokes-help): Doc fix.
* emulation/viper-init.el (viper-vi-style-in-minibuffer): Doc fix.
* emulation/viper.el (viper): Doc fix for custom group.
(top-level): Remove oh-so-no-longer-relevant text about vip.
* obsolete/otodo-mode.el (todo-prefix): Doc fix.
* ido.el (ido-save-directory-list-file):
* saveplace.el (save-place-file):
* calendar/timeclock.el (timeclock-file):
* net/quickurl.el (quickurl-url-file):
* obsolete/otodo-mode.el (todo-file-do, todo-file-done, todo-file-top):
* progmodes/idlwave.el (idlwave-config-directory):
* textmodes/remember.el (remember-data-file):
Bump :version.
2014-01-26 Glenn Morris <rgm@gnu.org>
* progmodes/opascal.el (opascal-tab-always-indents, opascal-tab):
......
......@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@
;;
;; (add-hook 'kill-emacs-query-functions 'timeclock-query-out)
;; NOTE: If you change your .timelog file without using timeclock's
;; NOTE: If you change your timelog file without using timeclock's
;; functions, or if you change the value of any of timeclock's
;; customizable variables, you should run the command
;; `timeclock-reread-log'. This will recompute any discrepancies in
......@@ -83,6 +83,7 @@
(defcustom timeclock-file (locate-user-emacs-file "timelog" ".timelog")
"The file used to store timeclock data in."
:version "24.4" ; added locate-user-emacs-file
:type 'file
:group 'timeclock)
......
......@@ -1887,7 +1887,8 @@ Please contact your system administrator. "
(if (featurep 'xemacs) "X" "")
))))))
;; Ex source command. Loads the file specified as argument or `~/.viper'
;; Ex source command.
;; Loads the file specified as argument or viper-custom-file-name.
(defun ex-source ()
(viper-get-ex-file)
(if (string= ex-file "")
......
......@@ -922,7 +922,7 @@ value refers to the number of characters affected."
(defcustom viper-vi-style-in-minibuffer t
"If t, use vi-style editing in minibuffer.
Should be set in `~/.viper' file."
Should be set in `viper-custom-file-name'."
:type 'boolean
:group 'viper)
......
......@@ -147,8 +147,8 @@ viper-insert-basic-map. Not recommended, except for novice users.")
(defvar viper-empty-keymap (make-sparse-keymap))
;; This was the main Vi mode in old versions of VIP which may have been
;; extensively used by VIP users. We declare it as a global var
;; and, after .viper is loaded, we add this keymap to viper-vi-basic-map.
;; extensively used by VIP users. We declare it as a global var and, after
;; viper-custom-file-name is loaded, we add this keymapto viper-vi-basic-map.
(defvar viper-mode-map (make-sparse-keymap))
;; Some important keys used in viper
......
......@@ -322,7 +322,8 @@ a key is a symbol, e.g., `a', `\\1', `f2', etc., or a list, e.g.,
;; More general definitions are inherited by more specific scopes:
;; global->major mode->buffer. More specific definitions override more general
(defun viper-record-kbd-macro (macro-name state macro-body &optional scope)
"Record a Vi macro. Can be used in `.viper' file to define permanent macros.
"Record a Vi macro.
Can be used in `viper-custom-file-name' to define permanent macros.
MACRO-NAME is a string of characters or a vector of keys. STATE is
either `vi-state' or `insert-state'. It specifies the Viper state in which to
define the macro. MACRO-BODY is a string that represents the keyboard macro.
......@@ -351,8 +352,8 @@ If SCOPE is nil, the user is asked to specify the scope."
(error "Can't map an empty macro name"))
;; Macro-name is usually a vector. However, command history or macros
;; recorded in ~/.viper may be recorded as strings. So, convert to
;; vectors.
;; recorded in viper-custom-file-name may be recorded as strings.
;; So, convert to vectors.
(setq macro-name (viper-fixup-macro macro-name))
(if (viper-char-array-p macro-name)
(setq macro-name (viper-char-array-to-macro macro-name)))
......@@ -422,7 +423,7 @@ If SCOPE is nil, the user is asked to specify the scope."
;; if we don't let vector macro-body through %S,
;; the symbols `\.' `\[' etc will be converted into
;; characters, causing invalid read error on recorded
;; macros in .viper.
;; macros in viper-custom-file-name.
;; I am not sure is macro-body can still be a string at
;; this point, but I am preserving this option anyway.
(if (vectorp macro-body)
......@@ -483,11 +484,11 @@ If SCOPE is nil, the user is asked to specify the scope."
;; in effect
(defun viper-unrecord-kbd-macro (macro-name state)
"Delete macro MACRO-NAME from Viper STATE.
MACRO-NAME must be a vector of viper-style keys. This command is used by Viper
internally, but the user can also use it in ~/.viper to delete pre-defined
macros supplied with Viper. The best way to avoid mistakes in macro names to
be passed to this function is to use viper-describe-kbd-macros and copy the
name from there."
MACRO-NAME must be a vector of viper-style keys. This command is used
by Viper internally, but you can also use it in `viper-custom-file-name'
to delete pre-defined macros supplied with Viper. The best way to avoid
mistakes in macro names to be passed to this function is to use
`viper-describe-kbd-macros' and copy the name from there."
(let* (state-name keymap
(macro-alist-var
(cond ((eq state 'vi-state)
......@@ -507,7 +508,8 @@ name from there."
macro-pair macro-entry)
;; Macro-name is usually a vector. However, command history or macros
;; recorded in ~/.viper may appear as strings. So, convert to vectors.
;; recorded in viper-custom-file-name may appear as strings.
;; So, convert to vectors.
(setq macro-name (viper-fixup-macro macro-name))
(if (viper-char-array-p macro-name)