Commit ef7dbdf5 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

Quote less in manuals

The manuals often used quotes ``...'' when it is better to use @dfn or
@code or capitalized words or no quoting at all.  For example, there is
no need for the `` and '' in “if a variable has one effect for
@code{nil} values and another effect for ``non-@code{nil}'' values”.
Reword the Emacs, Lisp intro, and Lisp reference manuals to eliminate
unnecessary quoting like this, and to use @dfn etc. instead when called
for (Bug#21472).
parent c051487f
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ to expand the letters in the buffer before point by looking for other
words in the buffer that start with those letters. @xref{Dynamic
Abbrevs}.
``Hippie'' expansion generalizes abbreviation expansion.
A third kind, @dfn{hippie expansion}, generalizes abbreviation expansion.
@xref{Hippie Expand, , Hippie Expansion, autotype, Features for
Automatic Typing}.
......@@ -250,10 +250,10 @@ keeps track of this to help you see which abbrevs you actually use, so
that you can eliminate those that you don't use often. The string at
the end of the line is the expansion.
Some abbrevs are marked with @samp{(sys)}. These ``system'' abbrevs
Some abbrevs are marked with @samp{(sys)}. These @dfn{system abbrevs}
(@pxref{Abbrevs,,, elisp, The Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}) are
pre-defined by various modes, and are not saved to your abbrev file.
To disable a ``system'' abbrev, define an abbrev of the same name that
To disable a system abbrev, define an abbrev of the same name that
expands to itself, and save it to your abbrev file.
@findex edit-abbrevs
......
......@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ directory changes in shell buffers; @file{filecache.el}, which records
which directories your files are in; @file{locate.el}, which
interfaces to the @code{locate} command; @file{find-lisp.el}, an Emacs
Lisp emulation of the @command{find} program; @file{net-utils.el}; and
the ``generic mode'' feature.
the generic mode feature.
@item
Emmanuel Briot wrote @file{xml.el}, an XML parser for Emacs; and
......@@ -196,7 +196,8 @@ for editing IDL and WAVE CL.
Bob Chassell wrote @file{texnfo-upd.el}, @file{texinfo.el}, and
@file{makeinfo.el}, modes and utilities for working with Texinfo files;
and @file{page-ext.el}, commands for extended page handling. He also
wrote the ``Introduction to programming in Emacs Lisp'' manual.
wrote the Emacs Lisp introduction. @xref{,,,eintr, Introduction to
Programming in Emacs Lisp}.
@item
Jihyun Cho wrote @file{hanja-util.el} and @file{hangul.el}, utilities
......@@ -247,10 +248,10 @@ for compiled Emacs Lisp code.
@item
Mathias Dahl wrote @file{image-dired.el}, a package for viewing image
files as ``thumbnails''.
files as thumbnails.
@item
Julien Danjou wrote an implementation of ``Desktop Notifications''
Julien Danjou wrote an implementation of desktop notifications
(@file{notifications.el}, and related packages for ERC and Gnus);
and @file{color.el}, a library for general color manipulation.
He also made various contributions to Gnus.
......@@ -544,11 +545,11 @@ diary entries to and from the iCalendar format;
@file{bubbles.el}, a puzzle game.
@item
Kyle Jones wrote @file{life.el}, a package to play Conway's ``life'' game.
Kyle Jones wrote @file{life.el}, a package to play Conway's Game of Life.
@item
Terry Jones wrote @file{shadow.el}, a package for finding potential
load-path problems when some Lisp file ``shadows'' another.
load-path problems when some Lisp file shadows another.
@item
Simon Josefsson wrote @file{dns-mode.el}, an editing mode for Domain
......@@ -708,7 +709,7 @@ Leo Liu wrote @file{pcmpl-x.el}, providing completion for
miscellaneous external tools; and revamped support for Octave in Emacs 24.4.
@item
Károly Lőrentey wrote the ``multi-terminal'' code, which allows
Károly Lőrentey wrote the multi-terminal code, which allows
Emacs to run on graphical and text terminals simultaneously.
@item
......@@ -726,7 +727,7 @@ Autoconf files; @file{cfengine.el}, a mode for editing Cfengine files;
@file{elide-head.el}, a package for eliding boilerplate text from file
headers; @file{hl-line.el}, a minor mode for highlighting the line in
the current window on which point is; @file{cap-words.el}, a minor mode
for motion in ``CapitalizedWordIdentifiers''; @file{latin1-disp.el}, a
for motion in @code{CapitalizedWordIdentifiers}; @file{latin1-disp.el}, a
package that lets you display ISO 8859 characters on Latin-1 terminals
by setting up appropriate display tables; the version of
@file{python.el} used prior to Emacs 24.3; @file{smiley.el}, a
......@@ -822,7 +823,7 @@ command with its arguments.
@item
Richard Mlynarik wrote @file{cl-indent.el}, a package for indenting
Common Lisp code; @file{ebuff-menu.el}, an ``electric'' browser for
Common Lisp code; @file{ebuff-menu.el}, an electric browser for
buffer listings; @file{ehelp.el}, bindings for browsing help screens;
and @file{rfc822.el}, a parser for E-mail addresses in the RFC-822 format,
used in mail messages and news articles.
......@@ -848,7 +849,7 @@ text; @file{smerge-mode.el}, a minor mode for resolving @code{diff3}
conflicts; @file{diff-mode.el}, a mode for viewing and editing context
diffs; @file{css-mode.el} for Cascading Style Sheets;
@file{bibtex-style.el} for Bib@TeX{} Style files; @file{mpc.el}, a
client for the ``Music Player Daemon''; @file{smie.el}, a generic
client for the Music Player Daemon (MPD); @file{smie.el}, a generic
indentation engine; and @file{pcase.el}, implementing ML-style pattern
matching. In Emacs 24, he integrated the lexical binding code,
cleaned up the CL namespace (making it acceptable to use CL
......@@ -930,7 +931,7 @@ Jeff Peck wrote @file{sun.el}, key bindings for sunterm keys.
@item
Damon Anton Permezel wrote @file{hanoi.el}, an animated demonstration of
the ``Towers of Hanoi'' puzzle.
the Towers of Hanoi puzzle.
@item
William M. Perry wrote @file{mailcap.el} (with Lars Magne
......@@ -1003,7 +1004,7 @@ source code version control systems, with Paul Eggert; @file{gud.el},
a package for running source-level debuggers like GDB and SDB in
Emacs; @file{asm-mode.el}, a mode for editing assembly language code;
@file{AT386.el}, terminal support package for IBM's AT keyboards;
@file{cookie1.el}, support for ``fortune-cookie'' programs like
@file{cookie1.el}, support for fortune-cookie programs like
@file{yow.el} and @file{spook.el}; @file{finder.el}, a package for
finding Emacs Lisp packages by keyword and topic; @file{keyswap.el},
code to swap the @key{BS} and @key{DEL} keys; @file{loadhist.el},
......@@ -1055,7 +1056,7 @@ DSSSL code.
@item
Martin Rudalics implemented improved display-buffer handling in Emacs 24;
and implemented ``pixel-wise'' resizing of windows and frames.
and implemented pixel-wise resizing of windows and frames.
@item
Ivar Rummelhoff wrote @file{winner.el}, which records recent window
......@@ -1177,7 +1178,7 @@ selecting regions to follow many other systems.
@item
Richard Stallman invented Emacs. He is the original author of GNU
Emacs, and has been Emacs maintainer over several non-contiguous
periods. In addition to much of the ``core'' Emacs code, he has
periods. In addition to much of the core Emacs code, he has
written @file{easymenu.el}, a facility for defining Emacs menus;
@file{image-mode.el}, support for visiting image files;
@file{menu-bar.el}, the Emacs menu bar support code;
......@@ -1193,8 +1194,8 @@ Ake Stenhoff and Lars Lindberg wrote @file{imenu.el}, a framework for
browsing indices made from buffer contents.
@item
Peter Stephenson wrote @file{vcursor.el}, which implements a ``virtual
cursor'' that you can move with the keyboard and use for copying text.
Peter Stephenson wrote @file{vcursor.el}, which implements a virtual
cursor that you can move with the keyboard and use for copying text.
@item
Ken Stevens wrote @file{ispell.el}, a spell-checker interface.
......@@ -1230,7 +1231,7 @@ the keyboard.
@item
Jean-Philippe Theberge wrote @file{thumbs.el}, a package for viewing
image files as ``thumbnails''.
image files as thumbnails.
@item
Spencer Thomas wrote the original @file{dabbrev.el}, providing a command
......@@ -1274,7 +1275,7 @@ for Gnus; and @file{timezone.el}, providing functions for dealing with
time zones.
@item
Neil W. Van Dyke wrote @file{webjump.el}, a ``hot links'' package.
Neil W. Van Dyke wrote @file{webjump.el}, a Web hotlist package.
@item
Didier Verna wrote @file{rect.el}, a package of functions for
......@@ -1373,7 +1374,7 @@ manual pages without the @code{man} command.
@item
Masatake Yamato wrote @file{ld-script.el}, an editing mode for GNU
linker scripts, and contributed subword handling and style
``guessing'' in CC mode.
guessing in CC mode.
@item
Jonathan Yavner wrote @file{testcover.el}, a package for keeping track
......
......@@ -13,21 +13,21 @@ greater simplicity that results from the absence of many Emacs
@itemize @bullet
@item
Support for displaying and editing ``bidirectional'' text has been
Support for displaying and editing bidirectional text has been
removed. Text is now always displayed on the screen in a single
consistent direction---left to right---regardless of the underlying
script. Similarly, @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-b} always move the text
cursor to the right and left respectively. Also, @key{RIGHT} and
@key{LEFT} are now equivalent to @kbd{C-f} and @kbd{C-b}, as you might
expect, rather than moving forward or backward based on the underlying
``paragraph direction''.
paragraph direction.
Users of ``right-to-left'' languages, like Arabic and Hebrew, may
Users of right-to-left languages, like Arabic and Hebrew, may
adapt by reading and/or editing text in left-to-right order.
@item
The Emacs Lisp package manager has been removed. Instead of using a
``user interface'' (@kbd{M-x list-packages}), additional Lisp packages
user interface (@kbd{M-x list-packages}), additional Lisp packages
must now be installed by hand, which is the most flexible and
``Lispy'' method anyway. Typically, this just involves editing your
init file to add the package installation directory to the load path
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ the text in the region; it deletes a single character instead.
We have reworked how Emacs handles the clipboard and the X primary
selection. Commands for killing and yanking, like @kbd{C-w} and
@kbd{C-y}, use the primary selection and not the clipboard, so you can
use these commands without interfering with ``cutting'' or ``pasting''
use these commands without interfering with cutting or pasting
in other programs. The @samp{Cut}/@samp{Copy}/@samp{Paste} menu items
are bound to separate clipboard commands, not to the same commands as
@kbd{C-w}/@kbd{M-w}/@kbd{C-y}.
......
......@@ -17,13 +17,13 @@ of buffers for which it is implemented (listed in the menu below).
Like file buffers, non-file buffers should normally not revert while
you are working on them, or while they contain information that might
get lost after reverting. Therefore, they do not revert if they are
``modified''. This can get tricky, because deciding when a non-file
modified. This can get tricky, because deciding when a non-file
buffer should be marked modified is usually more difficult than for
file buffers.
Another tricky detail is that, for efficiency reasons, Auto Revert
often does not try to detect all possible changes in the buffer, only
changes that are ``major'' or easy to detect. Hence, enabling
changes that are major or easy to detect. Hence, enabling
auto-reverting for a non-file buffer does not always guarantee that
all information in the buffer is up-to-date, and does not necessarily
make manual reverts useless.
......
......@@ -424,7 +424,7 @@ On some text terminals, Emacs may not recognize the @key{DEL} key
properly. @xref{DEL Does Not Delete}, if you encounter this problem.
The @key{Delete} (@code{delete-forward-char}) command deletes in the
``opposite direction'': it deletes the character after point, i.e., the
opposite direction: it deletes the character after point, i.e., the
character under the cursor. If point was at the end of a line, this
joins the following line onto this one. Like @kbd{@key{DEL}}, it
deletes the text in the region if the region is active (@pxref{Mark}).
......@@ -762,7 +762,7 @@ down one line, as you might expect---the @samp{0} is treated as part
of the prefix argument.
(What if you do want to insert five copies of @samp{0}? Type @kbd{M-5
C-u 0}. Here, @kbd{C-u} ``terminates'' the prefix argument, so that
C-u 0}. Here, @kbd{C-u} terminates the prefix argument, so that
the next keystroke begins the command that you want to execute. Note
that this meaning of @kbd{C-u} applies only to this case. For the
usual role of @kbd{C-u}, see below.)
......@@ -780,7 +780,7 @@ multiplies the argument for the next command by four. @kbd{C-u C-u}
multiplies it by sixteen. Thus, @kbd{C-u C-u C-f} moves forward
sixteen characters. Other useful combinations are @kbd{C-u C-n},
@kbd{C-u C-u C-n} (move down a good fraction of a screen), @kbd{C-u
C-u C-o} (make ``a lot'' of blank lines), and @kbd{C-u C-k} (kill four
C-u C-o} (make sixteen blank lines), and @kbd{C-u C-k} (kill four
lines).
You can use a numeric argument before a self-inserting character to
......
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ now displayed in any window.
While entering the buffer name, you can use the usual completion and
history commands (@pxref{Minibuffer}). Note that @kbd{C-x b}, and
related commands, use ``permissive completion with confirmation'' for
related commands, use @dfn{permissive completion with confirmation} for
minibuffer completion: if you type @key{RET} immediately after
completing up to a nonexistent buffer name, Emacs prints
@samp{[Confirm]} and you must type a second @key{RET} to submit that
......@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ buffers that were current most recently come first.
@samp{.} in the first field of a line indicates that the buffer is
current. @samp{%} indicates a read-only buffer. @samp{*} indicates
that the buffer is ``modified''. If several buffers are modified, it
that the buffer is modified. If several buffers are modified, it
may be time to save some with @kbd{C-x s} (@pxref{Save Commands}).
Here is an example of a buffer list:
......
......@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ nohup @var{command}; sleep 1
@end example
@ifnottex
On the MS-DOS ``operating system'', asynchronous subprocesses are
On MS-DOS, asynchronous subprocesses are
not supported, so @kbd{M-x compile} runs the compilation command
synchronously (i.e., you must wait until the command finishes before
you can do anything else in Emacs). @xref{MS-DOS}.
......@@ -334,7 +334,7 @@ you can do anything else in Emacs). @xref{MS-DOS}.
Just as you can run a compiler from Emacs and then visit the lines
with compilation errors, you can also run @command{grep} and then
visit the lines on which matches were found. This works by treating
the matches reported by @command{grep} as if they were ``errors''.
the matches reported by @command{grep} as if they were errors.
The output buffer uses Grep mode, which is a variant of Compilation
mode (@pxref{Compilation Mode}).
......@@ -800,12 +800,12 @@ the command to @kbd{C-c @var{binding}} in the GUD buffer's mode and to
@table @samp
@item %f
The name of the current source file. If the current buffer is the GUD
buffer, then the ``current source file'' is the file that the program
buffer, then the current source file is the file that the program
stopped in.
@item %l
The number of the current source line. If the current buffer is the GUD
buffer, then the ``current source line'' is the line that the program
buffer, then the current source line is the line that the program
stopped in.
@item %e
......@@ -848,7 +848,7 @@ GUD}). You must use this if you want to debug multiple programs
within one Emacs session, as that is currently unsupported by @kbd{M-x
gdb}.
Internally, @kbd{M-x gdb} informs GDB that its ``screen size'' is
Internally, @kbd{M-x gdb} informs GDB that its screen size is
unlimited; for correct operation, you must not change GDB's screen
height and width values during the debugging session.
......@@ -893,8 +893,8 @@ displays the following frame layout:
@findex gdb-restore-windows
@findex gdb-many-windows
If you ever change the window layout, you can restore the ``many
windows'' layout by typing @kbd{M-x gdb-restore-windows}. To toggle
If you ever change the window layout, you can restore the many-windows
layout by typing @kbd{M-x gdb-restore-windows}. To toggle
between the many windows layout and a simple layout with just the GUD
interaction buffer and a source file, type @kbd{M-x gdb-many-windows}.
......
......@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ all) of the variables @code{calendar-bahai-all-holidays-flag},
Each of the holiday variables is a list of @dfn{holiday forms}, each
form describing a holiday (or sometimes a list of holidays). Here is
a table of the possible kinds of holiday form. Day numbers and month
numbers count starting from 1, but ``dayname'' numbers count Sunday as
numbers count starting from 1, but @dfn{dayname} numbers count Sunday as
0. The argument @var{string} is always the description of the
holiday, as a string.
......@@ -840,7 +840,7 @@ Renew medication (5th time)
@noindent
in the fancy diary display on September 7, 2012.
There is an ``early reminder'' diary sexp that includes its entry in the
There is an early-reminder diary sexp that includes its entry in the
diary not only on the date of occurrence, but also on earlier dates.
For example, if you want a reminder a week before your anniversary, you
can use
......
......@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ For more advanced topics,
Calendar mode provides commands to move through the calendar in
logical units of time such as days, weeks, months, and years. If you
move outside the three months originally displayed, the calendar
display ``scrolls'' automatically through time to make the selected
display scrolls automatically through time to make the selected
date visible. Moving to a date lets you view its holidays or diary
entries, or convert it to other calendars; moving by long time periods
is also useful simply to scroll the calendar.
......@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ contents one month backwards in time.
@kindex M-v @r{(Calendar mode)}
@findex calendar-scroll-right-three-months
The commands @kbd{C-v} and @kbd{M-v} scroll the calendar by an entire
``screenful''---three months---in analogy with the usual meaning of
screenful---three months---in analogy with the usual meaning of
these commands. @kbd{C-v} makes later dates visible and @kbd{M-v} makes
earlier dates visible. These commands take a numeric argument as a
repeat count; in particular, since @kbd{C-u} multiplies the next command
......@@ -432,8 +432,8 @@ Generate a Filofax-style calendar for one year
(@code{cal-tex-cursor-filofax-year}).
@end table
Some of these commands print the calendar sideways (in ``landscape
mode''), so it can be wider than it is long. Some of them use Filofax
Some of these commands print the calendar sideways (in landscape
mode), so it can be wider than it is long. Some of them use Filofax
paper size (3.75in x 6.75in). All of these commands accept a prefix
argument, which specifies how many days, weeks, months or years to print
(starting always with the selected one).
......@@ -631,8 +631,8 @@ for all users in a @file{default.el} file. @xref{Init File}.
These calendar commands display the dates and times of the phases of
the moon (new moon, first quarter, full moon, last quarter). This
feature is useful for debugging problems that ``depend on the phase of
the moon''.
feature is useful for debugging problems that depend on the phase of
the moon.
@table @kbd
@item M
......@@ -665,7 +665,7 @@ See the discussion in the previous section. @xref{Sunrise/Sunset}.
@cindex Gregorian calendar
The Emacs calendar displayed is @emph{always} the Gregorian calendar,
sometimes called the ``new style'' calendar, which is used in most of
sometimes called the New Style calendar, which is used in most of
the world today. However, this calendar did not exist before the
sixteenth century and was not widely used before the eighteenth century;
it did not fully displace the Julian calendar and gain universal
......@@ -759,13 +759,13 @@ official calendar of Iran will be at that time.
into solar years. The years go in cycles of sixty, each year containing
either twelve months in an ordinary year or thirteen months in a leap
year; each month has either 29 or 30 days. Years, ordinary months, and
days are named by combining one of ten ``celestial stems'' with one of
twelve ``terrestrial branches'' for a total of sixty names that are
days are named by combining one of ten @dfn{celestial stems} with one of
twelve @dfn{terrestrial branches} for a total of sixty names that are
repeated in a cycle of sixty.
@cindex Bahá'í calendar
The Bahá'í calendar system is based on a solar cycle of 19 months with
19 days each. The four remaining ``intercalary'' days are placed
19 days each. The four remaining intercalary days are placed
between the 18th and 19th months.
@node To Other Calendar
......@@ -908,7 +908,7 @@ Islamic, or French names.
@findex calendar-hebrew-list-yahrzeits
@cindex yahrzeits
One common issue concerning the Hebrew calendar is the computation
of the anniversary of a date of death, called a ``yahrzeit''. The Emacs
of the anniversary of a date of death, called a @dfn{yahrzeit}. The Emacs
calendar includes a facility for such calculations. If you are in the
calendar, the command @kbd{M-x calendar-hebrew-list-yahrzeits} asks you for
a range of years and then displays a list of the yahrzeit dates for those
......@@ -1463,11 +1463,11 @@ variable @code{diary-outlook-formats}. Other mail clients can set
@c FIXME the name of the RFC is hardly very relevant.
@cindex iCalendar support
The icalendar package allows you to transfer data between your Emacs
diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in ``RFC
diary file and iCalendar files, which are defined in @cite{RFC
2445---Internet Calendaring and Scheduling Core Object Specification
(iCalendar)'' (as well as the earlier vCalendar format).
(iCalendar)} (as well as the earlier vCalendar format).
@c Importing works for ``ordinary'' (i.e., non-recurring) events, but
@c Importing works for ordinary (i.e., non-recurring) events, but
@c (at present) may not work correctly (if at all) for recurring events.
@c Exporting of diary files into iCalendar files should work correctly
@c for most diary entries. This feature is a work in progress, so the
......@@ -1601,11 +1601,11 @@ timeclock-change}.
Once you've collected data from a number of time intervals, you can use
@kbd{M-x timeclock-workday-remaining} to see how much time is left to
work today (assuming a typical average of 8 hours a day), and @kbd{M-x
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're ``done''.
timeclock-when-to-leave} which will calculate when you're done.
@vindex timeclock-modeline-display
@findex timeclock-modeline-display
If you want Emacs to display the amount of time ``left'' of your
If you want Emacs to display the amount of time left of your
workday in the mode line, either customize the
@code{timeclock-modeline-display} variable and set its value to
@code{t}, or invoke the @kbd{M-x timeclock-modeline-display} command.
......
......@@ -443,8 +443,8 @@ some other programs. Emacs does not require any of these environment
variables to be set, but it uses their values if they are set.
@c This used to be @vtable, but that enters the variables alone into
@c the Variable Index, which in some cases, like ``HOME'', might be
@c confused with keys by that name, and other cases, like ``NAME'',
@c the Variable Index, which in some cases, like HOME, might be
@c confused with keys by that name, and other cases, like NAME,
@c might be confused with general-purpose phrases.
@table @env
@item CDPATH
......@@ -582,7 +582,7 @@ The name of the news server. Used by the mh and Gnus packages.
@item ORGANIZATION
@vindex ORGANIZATION, environment variable
The name of the organization to which you belong. Used for setting the
``Organization:'' header in your posts from the Gnus package.
@samp{Organization:} header in your posts from the Gnus package.
@item PATH
@vindex PATH, environment variable
A colon-separated list of directories containing executable files.
......@@ -808,7 +808,7 @@ Use @var{font} as the default font.
@end table
When passing a font name to Emacs on the command line, you may need to
``quote'' it, by enclosing it in quotation marks, if it contains
quote it, by enclosing it in quotation marks, if it contains
characters that the shell treats specially (e.g., spaces). For
example:
......@@ -1036,7 +1036,7 @@ tool bar when it processes the specified geometry.
When using one of @samp{--fullscreen}, @samp{--maximized},
@samp{--fullwidth} or @samp{--fullheight}, some window managers require
you to set the variable @code{frame-resize-pixelwise} to a non-@code{nil}
value to make a frame appear truly ``maximized'' or ``fullscreen''.
value to make a frame appear truly maximized or fullscreen.
Some window managers have options that can make them ignore both
program-specified and user-specified positions. If these are set,
......@@ -1115,7 +1115,7 @@ for the initial Emacs frame.
@opindex --iconic
@itemx --iconic
@cindex start iconified, command-line argument
Start Emacs in an iconified (``minimized'') state.
Start Emacs in an iconified state.
@item -nbi
@opindex -nbi
......@@ -1125,12 +1125,12 @@ Start Emacs in an iconified (``minimized'') state.
Disable the use of the Emacs icon.
@end table
Most window managers allow you to ``iconify'' (or ``minimize'') an
Most window managers allow you to iconify (or minimize) an
Emacs frame, hiding it from sight. Some window managers replace
iconified windows with tiny ``icons'', while others remove them
iconified windows with tiny icons, while others remove them
entirely from sight. The @samp{-iconic} option tells Emacs to begin
running in an iconified state, rather than showing a frame right away.
The text frame doesn't appear until you deiconify (or ``un-minimize'')
The text frame doesn't appear until you deiconify (or un-minimize)
it.
By default, Emacs uses an icon containing the Emacs logo. On
......
......@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ where the @key{META} key does not function reliably.
On graphical displays, the window manager might block some keyboard
inputs, including @kbd{M-@key{TAB}}, @kbd{M-@key{SPC}}, @kbd{C-M-d}
and @kbd{C-M-l}. If you have this problem, you can either customize
your window manager to not block those keys, or ``rebind'' the
your window manager to not block those keys, or rebind the
affected Emacs commands (@pxref{Customization}).
@cindex input event
......
......@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ Reference Manual}.
to decide what to do; by setting variables,
you can control their functioning.
* Key Bindings:: The keymaps say what command each key runs.
By changing them, you can ``redefine keys''.
By changing them, you can redefine keys.
* Init File:: How to write common customizations in the
initialization file.
@end menu
......@@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ maximum length of the kill ring (@pxref{Earlier Kills}); if you give
@code{kill-ring-max} a string value, commands such as @kbd{C-y}
(@code{yank}) will signal an error. On the other hand, some variables
don't care about type; for instance, if a variable has one effect for
@code{nil} values and another effect for ``non-@code{nil}'' values,
@code{nil} values and another effect for non-@code{nil} values,
then any value that is not the symbol @code{nil} induces the second
effect, regardless of its type (by convention, we usually use the
value @code{t}---a symbol which stands for ``true''---to specify a
......@@ -773,22 +773,22 @@ C-h v fill-column @key{RET}
displays something like this:
@example
fill-column is a variable defined in `C source code'.
fill-column's value is 70
fill-column is a variable defined in C source code.
Its value is 70
Automatically becomes buffer-local when set.
This variable is safe as a file local variable if its value
satisfies the predicate @code{integerp}.
Automatically becomes buffer-local when set.
This variable is safe as a file local variable if its value
satisfies the predicate integerp.
Documentation:
Column beyond which automatic line-wrapping should happen.
Interactively, you can set the local value with C-x f.
Interactively, you can set the buffer local value using C-x f.
You can customize this variable.
@end example
@noindent
The line that says ``You can customize the variable'' indicates that
The line that says @samp{You can customize the variable} indicates that
this variable is a user option. @kbd{C-h v} is not restricted to user
options; it allows non-customizable variables too.
......@@ -1156,7 +1156,7 @@ the list. Here is an example:
# End:
@end example
Some ``variable names'' have special meanings in a local variables
Some names have special meanings in a local variables
list:
@itemize
......@@ -1761,7 +1761,7 @@ and @kbd{C-c p} in Texinfo mode:
alphabetical characters are case-insensitive. In other words,
@kbd{C-A} does the same thing as @kbd{C-a}, and @kbd{M-A} does the
same thing as @kbd{M-a}. This concerns only alphabetical characters,
and does not apply to ``shifted'' versions of other keys; for
and does not apply to shifted versions of other keys; for
instance, @kbd{C-@@} is not the same as @kbd{C-2}.
A @key{Control}-modified alphabetical character is always considered
......@@ -1784,9 +1784,9 @@ to them. The modifier bits are labeled as @samp{s-}, @samp{H-} and
@samp{A-} respectively.
Even if your keyboard lacks these additional modifier keys, you can
enter it using @kbd{C-x @@}: @kbd{C-x @@ h} adds the ``hyper'' flag to
the next character, @kbd{C-x @@ s} adds the ``super'' flag, and
@kbd{C-x @@ a} adds the ``alt'' flag. For instance, @kbd{C-x @@ h
enter it using @kbd{C-x @@}: @kbd{C-x @@ h} adds the Hyper flag to
the next character, @kbd{C-x @@ s} adds the Super flag, and
@kbd{C-x @@ a} adds the Alt flag. For instance, @kbd{C-x @@ h
C-a} is a way to enter @kbd{Hyper-Control-a}. (Unfortunately, there
is no way to add two modifiers by using @kbd{C-x @@} twice for the
same character, because the first one goes to work on the @kbd{C-x}.)
......@@ -1836,7 +1836,7 @@ key.
@xref{Init Rebinding}, for examples of binding function keys.
@cindex keypad
Many keyboards have a ``numeric keypad'' on the right hand side.
Many keyboards have a numeric keypad on the right hand side.
The numeric keys in the keypad double up as cursor motion keys,
toggled by a key labeled @samp{Num Lock}. By default, Emacs
translates these keys to the corresponding keys in the main keyboard.
......@@ -1866,13 +1866,13 @@ prefix arguments.
started out as names for certain @acronym{ASCII} control characters,
used so often that they have special keys of their own. For instance,
@key{TAB} was another name for @kbd{C-i}. Later, users found it
convenient to distinguish in Emacs between these keys and the ``same''
convenient to distinguish in Emacs between these keys and the corresponding
control characters typed with the @key{Ctrl} key. Therefore, on most
modern terminals, they are no longer the same: @key{TAB} is different
from @kbd{C-i}.
Emacs can distinguish these two kinds of input if the keyboard does.
It treats the ``special'' keys as function keys named @code{tab},
It treats the special keys as function keys named @code{tab},
@code{return}, @code{backspace}, @code{linefeed}, @code{escape}, and
@code{delete}. These function keys translate automatically into the
corresponding @acronym{ASCII} characters @emph{if} they have no
......@@ -1882,7 +1882,7 @@ need to pay attention to the distinction unless they care to.
If you do not want to distinguish between (for example) @key{TAB} and
@kbd{C-i}, make just one binding, for the @acronym{ASCII} character @key{TAB}
(octal code 011). If you do want to distinguish, make one binding for
this @acronym{ASCII} character, and another for the ``function key'' @code{tab}.
this @acronym{ASCII} character, and another for the function key @code{tab}.
With an ordinary @acronym{ASCII} terminal, there is no way to distinguish
between @key{TAB} and @kbd{C-i} (and likewise for other such pairs),
......@@ -1937,7 +1937,7 @@ single click definition has run when the first click was received.
This constrains what you can do with double clicks, but user interface
designers say that this constraint ought to be followed in any case. A
double click should do something similar to the single click, only
``more so''. The command for the double-click event should perform the
more so. The command for the double-click event should perform the
extra work for the double click.
If a double-click event has no binding, it changes to the
......@@ -1984,8 +1984,8 @@ or @samp{triple-}, which always precede @samp{drag-} or @samp{down-}.
A frame includes areas that don't show text from the buffer, such as
the mode line and the scroll bar. You can tell whether a mouse button
comes from a special area of the screen by means of dummy ``prefix
keys''. For example, if you click the mouse in the mode line, you get
comes from a special area of the screen by means of dummy prefix
keys. For example, if you click the mouse in the mode line, you get
the prefix key @code{mode-line} before the ordinary mouse-button symbol.