Commit f5d4cd5e authored by Dave Love's avatar Dave Love
Browse files

Speling &c.

parent e066768e
......@@ -762,7 +762,7 @@ Various
* Compilation:: How to speed Gnus up.
* Mode Lines:: Displaying information in the mode lines.
* Highlighting and Menus:: Making buffers look all nice and cozy.
* Buttons:: Get tendonitis in ten easy steps!
* Buttons:: Get tendinitis in ten easy steps!
* Daemons:: Gnus can do things behind your back.
* NoCeM:: How to avoid spam and other fatty foods.
* Undo:: Some actions can be undone.
......@@ -1057,7 +1057,7 @@ conjunction with each other, you have to send $1 per usage instance to
me. Usage of the patent (@dfn{Master/Slave Relationships In Computer
Applications}) will be much more expensive, of course.)
 
Anyways, you start one Gnus up the normal way with @kbd{M-x gnus} (or
Anyway, you start one Gnus up the normal way with @kbd{M-x gnus} (or
however you do it). Each subsequent slave Gnusae should be started with
@kbd{M-x gnus-slave}. These slaves won't save normal @file{.newsrc}
files, but instead save @dfn{slave files} that contain information only
......@@ -4560,9 +4560,9 @@ Forward the current article to some other person
(@code{gnus-summary-mail-forward}). If no prefix is given, the message
is forwarded according to the value of (@code{message-forward-as-mime})
and (@code{message-forward-show-mml}); if the prefix is 1, decode the
message and forward directly inline; if the prefix is 2, foward message
message and forward directly inline; if the prefix is 2, forward message
as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 3, decode message and
forward as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 4, foward message
forward as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 4, forward message
directly inline; otherwise, the message is forwarded as no prefix given
but use the flipped value of (@code{message-forward-as-mime}). By
default, the message is decoded and forwarded as an rfc822 MIME section.
......@@ -4694,9 +4694,9 @@ Forward the current article to a newsgroup
If no prefix is given, the message is forwarded according to the value
of (@code{message-forward-as-mime}) and
(@code{message-forward-show-mml}); if the prefix is 1, decode the
message and forward directly inline; if the prefix is 2, foward message
message and forward directly inline; if the prefix is 2, forward message
as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 3, decode message and
forward as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 4, foward message
forward as an rfc822 MIME section; if the prefix is 4, forward message
directly inline; otherwise, the message is forwarded as no prefix given
but use the flipped value of (@code{message-forward-as-mime}). By
default, the message is decoded and forwarded as an rfc822 MIME section.
......@@ -5147,7 +5147,7 @@ even though I haven't heard of anybody wanting it to go to the
previous (unread) article, I'm sure there are people that want that as
well.
 
Multiply these five behaviours with five different marking commands, and
Multiply these five behaviours by five different marking commands, and
you get a potentially complex set of variable to control what each
command should do.
 
......@@ -5432,7 +5432,7 @@ hierarchical fashion.
Threading is done by looking at the @code{References} headers of the
articles. In a perfect world, this would be enough to build pretty
trees, but unfortunately, the @code{References} header is often broken
or simply missing. Weird news propagation excarcerbates the problem,
or simply missing. Weird news propagation exacerbates the problem,
so one has to employ other heuristics to get pleasing results. A
plethora of approaches exists, as detailed in horrible detail in
@pxref{Customizing Threading}.
......@@ -6132,7 +6132,7 @@ Used carefully, though, it could be just an easier way to save articles.
To turn caching on, set @code{gnus-use-cache} to @code{t}. By default,
all articles ticked or marked as dormant will then be copied
over to your local cache (@code{gnus-cache-directory}). Whether this
cache is flat or hierarchal is controlled by the
cache is flat or hierarchical is controlled by the
@code{gnus-use-long-file-name} variable, as usual.
 
When re-selecting a ticked or dormant article, it will be fetched from the
......@@ -7209,8 +7209,8 @@ Hide @sc{pem} (privacy enhanced messages) cruft
@findex gnus-article-strip-banner
@cindex banner
@cindex OneList
@cindex stripping advertisments
@cindex advertisments
@cindex stripping advertisements
@cindex advertisements
Strip the banner specified by the @code{banner} group parameter
(@code{gnus-article-strip-banner}). This is mainly used to hide those
annoying banners and/or signatures that some mailing lists and moderated
......@@ -7933,7 +7933,7 @@ variable, which is an alist of regexps (to match group names) and
default charsets to be used when reading these groups.
 
In addition, some people do use soi-disant @sc{mime}-aware agents that
aren't. These blitely mark messages as being in @code{iso-8859-1} even
aren't. These blithely mark messages as being in @code{iso-8859-1} even
if they really are in @code{koi-8}. To help here, the
@code{gnus-newsgroup-ignored-charsets} variable can be used. The
charsets that are listed here will be ignored. The variable can be set
......@@ -9686,7 +9686,7 @@ use to store sent messages. The default is:
@end lisp
 
You can, however, use any mail select method (@code{nnml},
@code{nnmbox}, etc.). @code{nnfolder} is a quite likeable select method
@code{nnmbox}, etc.). @code{nnfolder} is a quite likable select method
for doing this sort of thing, though. If you don't like the default
directory chosen, you could say something like:
 
......@@ -10054,7 +10054,7 @@ These select method specifications can sometimes become quite
complicated---say, for instance, that you want to read from the
@sc{nntp} server @samp{news.funet.fi} on port number 13, which
hangs if queried for @sc{nov} headers and has a buggy select. Ahem.
Anyways, if you had to specify that for each group that used this
Anyway, if you had to specify that for each group that used this
server, that would be too much work, so Gnus offers a way of naming
select methods, which is what you do in the server buffer.
 
......@@ -10173,7 +10173,7 @@ servers.
@findex gnus-server-regenerate-server
Request that the server regenerate all its data structures
(@code{gnus-server-regenerate-server}). This can be useful if you have
a mail backend that has gotten out of synch.
a mail backend that has gotten out of sync.
 
@end table
 
......@@ -10666,7 +10666,7 @@ This works for Solaris @code{telnet}, for instance.
Opens a connection to a server over a @dfn{secure} channel. To use this
you must have SSLay installed
(@uref{ftp://ftp.psy.uq.oz.au/pub/Crypto/SSL}, and you also need
@file{ssl.el} (from the W3 distributeion, for instance). You then
@file{ssl.el} (from the W3 distribution, for instance). You then
define a server as follows:
 
@lisp
......@@ -10745,7 +10745,7 @@ server closes connection.
@item nntp-record-commands
@vindex nntp-record-commands
If non-@code{nil}, @code{nntp} will log all commands it sends to the
@sc{nntp} server (along with a timestep) in the @samp{*nntp-log*}
@sc{nntp} server (along with a timestamp) in the @samp{*nntp-log*}
buffer. This is useful if you are debugging a Gnus/@sc{nntp} connection
that doesn't seem to work.
 
......@@ -10762,7 +10762,7 @@ and might be useful, for instance, to speed up reading groups that
contain very big articles---@samp{alt.binaries.pictures.furniture}, for
instance.
 
Anyways, you just specify @code{nnspool} as the method and @code{""} (or
Anyway, you just specify @code{nnspool} as the method and @code{""} (or
anything else) as the address.
 
If you have access to a local spool, you should probably use that as the
......@@ -13840,7 +13840,7 @@ doesn't exist actually does exist. More specifically, @sc{imap} has
this concept of marking articles @code{Deleted} which doesn't actually
delete them, and this (marking them @code{Deleted}, that is) is what
nnimap does when you delete a article in Gnus (with @kbd{G DEL} or
similair).
similar).
 
Since the articles aren't really removed when we mark them with the
@code{Deleted} flag we'll need a way to actually delete them. Feel like
......@@ -13855,7 +13855,7 @@ The possible options are:
@table @code
 
@item always
The default behaviour, delete all articles marked as "Deleted" when
The default behavior, delete all articles marked as "Deleted" when
closing a mailbox.
@item never
Never actually delete articles. Currently there is no way of showing
......@@ -13980,8 +13980,8 @@ end. The first rule to make a match will "win", unless you have
crossposting enabled. In that case, all matching rules will "win".
 
This variable can also have a function as its value, the function will
be called with the headers narrowed and should return a group where it
thinks the article should be splitted to. See @code{nnimap-split-fancy}.
be called with the headers narrowed and should return a group to where
it thinks the article should be split. See @code{nnimap-split-fancy}.
 
The splitting code tries to create mailboxes if it need too.
 
......@@ -14012,7 +14012,7 @@ Nnmail equivalent: @code{nnmail-split-methods}.
@vindex nnimap-split-predicate
 
Mail matching this predicate in @code{nnimap-split-inbox} will be
splitted, it is a string and the default is @samp{UNSEEN UNDELETED}.
split; it is a string and the default is @samp{UNSEEN UNDELETED}.
 
This might be useful if you use another @sc{imap} client to read mail in
your inbox but would like Gnus to split all articles in the inbox
......@@ -14522,7 +14522,7 @@ and simply specify your predicate as:
If/when using something like the above, be aware that there are many
misconfigured systems/mailers out there and so an article's date is not
always a reliable indication of when it was posted. Hell, some people
just don't give a damm.
just don't give a damn.
 
The above predicates apply to *all* the groups which belong to the
category. However, if you wish to have a specific predicate for an
......@@ -14633,7 +14633,7 @@ about parenthesis?
@item
Use @code{normal} score files
 
If you dont want to maintain two sets of scoring rules for a group, and
If you don't want to maintain two sets of scoring rules for a group, and
your desired @code{downloading} criteria for a group are the same as your
@code{reading} criteria then you can tell the agent to refer to your
@code{normal} score files when deciding what to download.
......@@ -14921,7 +14921,7 @@ disconnected, and synchronize these flags when you plug back in.
 
Gnus keep track of flag changes when reading nnimap groups under the
Agent by default. When you plug back in, by default Gnus will check if
you have any changed any flags and ask if you wish to synchronize theese
you have any changed any flags and ask if you wish to synchronize these
with the server. This behaviour is customizable with
@code{gnus-agent-synchronize-flags}.
 
......@@ -17694,7 +17694,7 @@ machine, and every user was running Simula compilers. Bah!
Right.
 
@vindex gnus-carpal
Well, you can make Gnus display bufferfuls of buttons you can click to
Well, you can make Gnus display buffers full of buttons you can click to
do anything by setting @code{gnus-carpal} to @code{t}. Pretty simple,
really. Tell the chiropractor I sent you.
 
......@@ -18324,7 +18324,7 @@ Whether to move point to first empty line when displaying picons. This
has only an effect if `gnus-picons-display-where' has value `article'.
 
If @code{nil}, display the picons in the @code{From} and
@code{Newsgroups} lines. This is the defailt.
@code{Newsgroups} lines. This is the default.
 
@item gnus-picons-clear-cache-on-shutdown
@vindex gnus-picons-clear-cache-on-shutdown
......@@ -18536,7 +18536,7 @@ First, pick one (1) valid mail address that you can be reached at, and
put it in your @code{From} header of all your news articles. (I've
chosen @samp{larsi@@trym.ifi.uio.no}, but for many addresses on the form
@samp{larsi+usenet@@ifi.uio.no} will be a better choice. Ask your
sysadm whether your sendmail installation accepts keywords in the local
sysadmin whether your sendmail installation accepts keywords in the local
part of the mail address.)
 
@lisp
......@@ -19043,7 +19043,7 @@ importantly, talking about new experimental features that have been
introduced may confuse casual users. New features are frequently
introduced, fiddled with, and judged to be found wanting, and then
either discarded or totally rewritten. People reading the mailing list
usually keep up with these rapid changes, whille people on the newsgroup
usually keep up with these rapid changes, while people on the newsgroup
can't be assumed to do so.
 
 
......
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