Commit f8635375 authored by Eli Zaretskii's avatar Eli Zaretskii

Change "filename" to "file name" or "file-name".

Change "uppercase" to "upper case" or "upper-case".
Change "lowercase" to "lower case" or "lower-case".
Fix "allows to".
(From Nelson Beebe.)
parent 36e10400
......@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ Emacs.
@item
Steven L.@: Baur wrote @file{earcon.el}, a facility for sound effects
for email and news messages, @file{footnote.el} which allows to include
for email and news messages, @file{footnote.el} which lets you include
footnotes in email messages, and @file{gnus-audio.el} which provides
sound effects for Gnus.
......@@ -604,7 +604,7 @@ the line in the current window on which point is,
case-conversion and syntax tables for the ISO Latin-8 and Latin-9
character sets,
@item
@file{latin1-disp.el}, a package that allows to display ISO 8859
@file{latin1-disp.el}, a package that lets you display ISO 8859
characters on Latin-1 terminals by setting up appropriate display
tables,
@item
......
......@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ used in the FAQ.
* Basic keys::
* Extended commands::
* On-line manual::
* Filename conventions::
* File-name conventions::
* Common acronyms::
@end menu
......@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ really means press the space key.
The ASCII code sent by @kbd{C-x} (except for @kbd{C-?}) is the value
that would be sent by pressing just @key{x} minus 96 (or 64 for
uppercase @key{X}) and will be from 0 to 31. On Unix and GNU/Linux
upper-case @key{X}) and will be from 0 to 31. On Unix and GNU/Linux
terminals, the ASCII code sent by @kbd{M-x} is the sum of 128 and the
ASCII code that would be sent by pressing just @key{x}. Essentially,
@key{Control} turns off bits 5 and 6 and @key{Meta} turns on bit
......@@ -223,7 +223,7 @@ good candidate for this, on keyboards that have such a key.
If you need to run non-interactive Emacs functions, see @ref{Evaluating
Emacs Lisp code}.
@node On-line manual, Filename conventions, Extended commands, FAQ notation
@node On-line manual, File-name conventions, Extended commands, FAQ notation
@section How do I read topic XXX in the on-line manual?
@cindex On-line manual, reading topics in
@cindex Reading topics in the on-line manual
......@@ -247,10 +247,10 @@ improperly. In this case you should complain.
@xref{Getting a printed manual}, if you would like a paper copy of the
Emacs manual.
@node Filename conventions, Common acronyms, On-line manual, FAQ notation
@node File-name conventions, Common acronyms, On-line manual, FAQ notation
@section What are @file{etc/SERVICE}, @file{src/config.h}, and @file{lisp/default.el}?
@cindex Filename conventions
@cindex Conventions for filenames
@cindex File-name conventions
@cindex Conventions for file names
@cindex Directories and files that come with Emacs
These are files that come with Emacs. The Emacs distribution is divided
......@@ -280,7 +280,7 @@ also available via the Emacs "@samp{Help} menu, or by typing @kbd{C-h ?}
Your system administrator may have removed the @file{src} directory and
many files from the @file{etc} directory.
@node Common acronyms, , Filename conventions, FAQ notation
@node Common acronyms, , File-name conventions, FAQ notation
@section What are FSF, LPF, OSF, GNU, RMS, FTP, and GPL?
@cindex FSF, definition of
@cindex LPF, definition of
......@@ -758,7 +758,7 @@ perform these steps:
@enumerate
@item
Move the files to the @file{info} directory in the installed Emacs
distribution. @xref{Filename conventions}, if you don't know where that
distribution. @xref{File-name conventions}, if you don't know where that
is.
@item
......@@ -915,7 +915,7 @@ informational files about Emacs and relevant aspects of the GNU project
are available for you to read.
The following files are available in the @file{etc} directory of the
Emacs distribution (see @ref{Filename conventions}, if you're not sure
Emacs distribution (see @ref{File-name conventions}, if you're not sure
where that is).
@table @file
......@@ -977,7 +977,7 @@ Bulletin}, are at
@ref{Problems building Emacs}, or @ref{Linking with -lX11 fails}, if you
have problems with the installation.
The file @file{etc/SERVICE} (see @ref{Filename conventions}, if you're
The file @file{etc/SERVICE} (see @ref{File-name conventions}, if you're
not sure where that is) lists companies and individuals willing to sell
you help in installing or using Emacs. An up-to-date version this file
is available on @samp{ftp.gnu.org} (@pxref{Informational files for
......@@ -1032,7 +1032,7 @@ Via HTTP or FTP. You can always fetch the latest FAQ from
@item
In the Emacs distribution. Since Emacs 18.56, the FAQ at the time
of release has been part of the Emacs distribution as
@file{man/faq.texi} (@pxref{Filename conventions}).
@file{man/faq.texi} (@pxref{File-name conventions}).
@item
Via the World Wide Web. A hypertext version is available at
......@@ -1113,7 +1113,7 @@ original TECO Emacs inside of Emacs.
@cindex Why Emacs?
For some not-so-serious alternative reasons for Emacs to have that
name, check out the file @file{etc/JOKES} (@pxref{Filename
name, check out the file @file{etc/JOKES} (@pxref{File-name
conventions}).
@node Latest version of Emacs, New in Emacs 20, Origin of the term Emacs, Status of Emacs
......@@ -1181,7 +1181,7 @@ and on @code{xterm} with @kbd{emacs -nw}.
* Debugging a customization file::
* Colors on a TTY::
* Displaying the current line or column::
* Displaying the current filename in the titlebar::
* Displaying the current file name in the titlebar::
* Turning on abbrevs by default::
* Turning on auto-fill by default::
* Associating modes with files::
......@@ -1296,7 +1296,7 @@ eval-last-sexp}).
Use @kbd{C-h v} (@kbd{M-x describe-variable}) to check the value of
variables which you are trying to set or use.
@node Displaying the current line or column, Displaying the current filename in the titlebar, Debugging a customization file, Common requests
@node Displaying the current line or column, Displaying the current file name in the titlebar, Debugging a customization file, Common requests
@section How do I make Emacs display the current line (or column) number?
@cindex @code{line-number-mode}
@cindex Displaying the current line or column
......@@ -1344,10 +1344,10 @@ instructions on how to get it.
None of the @code{vi} emulation modes provide the ``set number''
capability of @code{vi} (as far as we know).
@node Displaying the current filename in the titlebar, Turning on abbrevs by default, Displaying the current line or column, Common requests
@section How can I modify the titlebar to contain the current filename?
@cindex Titlebar, displaying the current filename in
@cindex Filename, displaying in the titlebar
@node Displaying the current file name in the titlebar, Turning on abbrevs by default, Displaying the current line or column, Common requests
@section How can I modify the titlebar to contain the current file name?
@cindex Titlebar, displaying the current file name in
@cindex File name, displaying in the titlebar
@cindex @code{frame-title-format}
The contents of an Emacs frame's titlebar is controlled by the variable
......@@ -1374,7 +1374,7 @@ in your @file{.emacs}:
(setq frame-title-format "%b")
@end lisp
@node Turning on abbrevs by default, Turning on auto-fill by default, Displaying the current filename in the titlebar, Common requests
@node Turning on abbrevs by default, Turning on auto-fill by default, Displaying the current file name in the titlebar, Common requests
@section How do I turn on abbrevs by default just in mode @var{mymode}?
@cindex Abbrevs, turning on by default
......@@ -2982,10 +2982,10 @@ over NFS anyway, the best solution is to recompile Emacs with
@node Editing files with $ in the name, Shell mode loses the current directory, Emacs takes a long time to visit files, Bugs and problems
@section How do I edit a file with a @samp{$} in its name?
@cindex Editing files with @samp{$} in the name
@cindex @samp{$} in filenames
@cindex Filenames containing @samp{$}, editing
@cindex @samp{$} in file names
@cindex File names containing @samp{$}, editing
When entering a filename in the minibuffer, Emacs will attempt to expand
When entering a file name in the minibuffer, Emacs will attempt to expand
a @samp{$} followed by a word as an environment variable. To suppress
this behavior, type @kbd{$$} instead.
......@@ -3396,7 +3396,7 @@ string @samp{wordstar}.
It is also possible that the package is on your system, but has not been
loaded. To see which packages are available for loading, look through
your computer's lisp directory (@pxref{Filename conventions}). The Lisp
your computer's lisp directory (@pxref{File-name conventions}). The Lisp
source to most packages contains a short description of how they
should be loaded, invoked, and configured---so before you use or
modify a Lisp package, see if the author has provided any hints in the
......@@ -3604,7 +3604,7 @@ following:
@item Compiler
DJGPP version 1.12 maint 1 or later. Djgpp 2.0 or later is
recommended, since 1.x is very old an unmaintained. Djgpp 2 supports
long filenames on Windows 9X/ME/2K.
long file names on Windows 9X/ME/2K.
You can get the latest release of DJGPP by retrieving all of
the files in
......
......@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ called @samp{Top} in this file (its directory node).
Unlike @kbd{m}, @kbd{g} does not allow the use of abbreviations.
To go to a node in another file, you can include the filename in the
To go to a node in another file, you can include the file name in the
node name by putting it at the front, in parentheses. Thus,
@kbd{g(dir)Top@key{RET}} would go to the Info Directory node, which is
node @samp{Top} in the file @file{dir}.
......@@ -780,7 +780,7 @@ node @kbd{*} is to make it possible to make old-fashioned,
unstructured files into nodes of the tree.
The @samp{Node:} name, in which a node states its own name, must not
contain a filename, since Info when searching for a node does not
contain a file name, since Info when searching for a node does not
expect one to be there. The @samp{Next}, @samp{Previous} and @samp{Up} names may
contain them. In this node, since the @samp{Up} node is in the same file,
it was not necessary to use one.
......
......@@ -478,7 +478,7 @@ the history, while @kbd{M-s} (@code{next-matching-history-element})
searches newer elements. By special dispensation, these commands can
use the minibuffer to read their arguments even though you are already
in the minibuffer when you issue them. As with incremental searching,
an uppercase letter in the regular expression makes the search
an upper-case letter in the regular expression makes the search
case-sensitive (@pxref{Search Case}).
@ignore
......
......@@ -1034,8 +1034,8 @@ of the buffer, or on the active region in Transient Mark mode.
Display a list showing each line in the buffer that contains a match
for @var{regexp}. To limit the search to part of the buffer, narrow
to that part (@pxref{Narrowing}). A numeric argument @var{n}
specifies to display @var{n} lines of context before and after each
matching line.
specifies that @var{n} lines of context are to be displayed before and
after each matching line.
@kindex RET @r{(Occur mode)}
The buffer @samp{*Occur*} containing the output serves as a menu for
......
Markdown is supported
0% or
You are about to add 0 people to the discussion. Proceed with caution.
Finish editing this message first!
Please register or to comment