Commit f97b3732 authored by Richard M. Stallman's avatar Richard M. Stallman
Browse files

Minor cleanups. "Graphical display", not window system.

parent 590e3b9e
......@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ system crash. @xref{Auto Save}.
Font-Lock mode automatically highlights certain textual units found in
programs, such as comments, strings, and function names being defined.
This requires a window system that can display multiple fonts.
This requires a graphical display that can show multiple fonts.
@xref{Faces}.
ISO Accents mode makes the characters @samp{`}, @samp{'}, @samp{"},
......@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ and set their values, and to save settings permanently in your
@file{~/.emacs} file (@pxref{Init File}).
The appearance of the example buffers in this section is typically
different under a window system, since faces are then used to indicate
different under a graphical display, since faces are then used to indicate
buttons, links and editable fields.
@menu
......@@ -2030,7 +2030,7 @@ Reference Manual}.
When Emacs is started, it normally loads a Lisp program from the
file @file{.emacs} or @file{.emacs.el} in your home directory
(see @ref{General Variables, HOME} if you don't know where that is).
(see @ref{General Variables, HOME}, if you don't know where that is).
We call this file your @dfn{init file} because it specifies how to
initialize Emacs for you. You can use the command line switch
@samp{-q} to prevent loading your init file, and @samp{-u} (or
......@@ -2456,7 +2456,7 @@ currently pretending to be. The idea is that you should get your own
editor customizations even if you are running as the super user.
More precisely, Emacs first determines which user's init file to use.
It gets the user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
It gets your user name from the environment variables @env{LOGNAME} and
@env{USER}; if neither of those exists, it uses effective user-ID.
If that user name matches the real user-ID, then Emacs uses @env{HOME};
otherwise, it looks up the home directory corresponding to that user
......
......@@ -510,8 +510,10 @@ Here's a similar example for specifying a foreground color:
@kindex C-z @r{(X windows)}
@findex iconify-or-deiconify-frame
Iconify the selected Emacs frame (@code{iconify-or-deiconify-frame}).
The normal meaning of @kbd{C-z}, to suspend Emacs, is not useful under a
window system, so it has a different binding in that case.
The normal meaning of @kbd{C-z}, to suspend Emacs, is not useful under
a graphical display that allows multiple applications to operate
simultaneously in their own windies, so Emacs gives @kbd{C-z} a
different binding in that case.
If you type this command on an Emacs frame's icon, it deiconifies the frame.
......@@ -967,8 +969,8 @@ customizing the windows that display tooltips.
@cindex mouse avoidance
@vindex mouse-avoidance-mode
Mouse Avoidance mode keeps the window system mouse pointer away from
point, to avoid obscuring text. Whenever it moves the mouse, it also
Mouse Avoidance mode keeps the mouse pointer away from point, to avoid
obscuring text you want to edit. Whenever it moves the mouse, it also
raises the frame. To use Mouse Avoidance mode, customize the variable
@code{mouse-avoidance-mode}. You can set this to various values to
move the mouse in several ways:
......
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