Commit f99f1641 authored by Paul Eggert's avatar Paul Eggert

Hyphen and dash fixes in texinfo files.

parent f109a67e
......@@ -372,7 +372,7 @@ Generate a one-month calendar (@code{cal-html-cursor-month}).
@item H y
Generate a calendar file for each month of a year, as well as an index
page (@code{cal-html-cursor-year}). By default, this command writes
files to a @var{yyyy} subdirectory - if this is altered some hyperlinks
files to a @var{yyyy} subdirectory---if this is altered some hyperlinks
between years will not work.
@end table
......
......@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@
@copying
This manual describes specialized features of Emacs.
Copyright @copyright{} 2004-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 2004--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ modify this GNU manual.''
@menu
* Introduction:: What documentation belongs here?
@iftex
* Picture Mode:: Editing pictures made up of characters using
* Picture Mode:: Editing pictures made up of characters using
the quarter-plane screen model.
* Autorevert:: Auto Reverting non-file buffers.
......
......@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ This is the @cite{GNU Emacs Manual},
@end ifnottex
updated for Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
Copyright @copyright{} 1985-1987, 1993-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1985--1987, 1993--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -817,5 +817,5 @@ of color names and RGB triplets. Color names should be enclosed with
double quotes, e.g., @samp{"red"}. RGB triplets should be written
without double quotes, e.g., @samp{#ff0000}. GTK-style RGB triplets
have the form @w{@code{@{ @var{r}, @var{g}, @var{b} @}}}, where
@var{r}, @var{g} and @var{b} are either integers in the range 0-65535
or floats in the range 0.0-1.0.
@var{r}, @var{g} and @var{b} are either integers in the range 0--65535
or floats in the range 0.0--1.0.
......@@ -228,7 +228,8 @@ people who are not programmers.
@sp 1
Edition @value{edition-number}, @value{update-date}
@sp 1
Copyright @copyright{} 1990-1995, 1997, 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1990--1995, 1997, 2001--2012 Free Software
Foundation, Inc.
@sp 1
@iftex
......@@ -6281,7 +6282,7 @@ the arithmetic, a conversion is necessary, and
@findex / @r{(division)}
@cindex Division
The second argument is @code{(/ size 10)}. This expression divides
the numeric value by ten --- the numeric value of the size of the
the numeric value by ten---the numeric value of the size of the
accessible portion of the buffer. This produces a number that tells
how many characters make up one tenth of the buffer size. (In Lisp,
@code{/} is used for division, just as @code{*} is used for
......@@ -9402,7 +9403,7 @@ either by setting it manually or by using @code{customize}.
For me, the major use of the @code{set-variable} command is to suggest
variables that I might want to set in my @file{.emacs} file. There
are now more than 700 such variables --- far too many to remember
are now more than 700 such variables, far too many to remember
readily. Fortunately, you can press @key{TAB} after calling the
@code{M-x set-variable} command to see the list of variables.
(@xref{Examining, , Examining and Setting Variables, emacs,
......@@ -11195,8 +11196,8 @@ The @code{dolist} expression does very much the same as the
of the work you have to do when writing a @code{while} expression.
Like a @code{while} loop, a @code{dolist} loops. What is different is
that it automatically shortens the list each time it loops --- it
`@sc{cdr}s down the list' on its own --- and it automatically binds
that it automatically shortens the list each time it loops---it
`@sc{cdr}s down the list' on its own---and it automatically binds
the @sc{car} of each shorter version of the list to the first of its
arguments.
......@@ -13300,8 +13301,8 @@ We can see that this is a decrementing counter @code{while} loop,
using the expression @code{(setq arg (1- arg))} as the decrementer.
That expression is not far from the @code{while}, but is hidden in
another Lisp macro, an @code{unless} macro. Unless we are at the end
of the buffer --- that is what the @code{eobp} function determines; it
is an abbreviation of @samp{End Of Buffer P} --- we decrease the value
of the buffer---that is what the @code{eobp} function determines; it
is an abbreviation of @samp{End Of Buffer P}---we decrease the value
of @code{arg} by one.
(If we are at the end of the buffer, we cannot go forward any more and
......@@ -15657,7 +15658,7 @@ as a list that looks like this (but with more elements):
The @code{directory-files-and-attributes} function returns a list of
lists. Each of the lists within the main list consists of 13
elements. The first element is a string that contains the name of the
file -- which, in GNU/Linux, may be a `directory file', that is to
file---which, in GNU/Linux, may be a `directory file', that is to
say, a file with the special attributes of a directory. The second
element of the list is @code{t} for a directory, a string
for symbolic link (the string is the name linked to), or @code{nil}.
......@@ -16850,7 +16851,7 @@ Write a line graph version of the graph printing functions.
@cindex Customizing your @file{.emacs} file
@cindex Initialization file
``You don't have to like Emacs to like it'' -- this seemingly
``You don't have to like Emacs to like it''---this seemingly
paradoxical statement is the secret of GNU Emacs. The plain, `out of
the box' Emacs is a generic tool. Most people who use it, customize
it to suit themselves.
......@@ -18282,7 +18283,7 @@ or `All'. (A lower case @samp{p} tell you the percentage above the
@emph{top} of the window.) @samp{%-} inserts enough dashes to fill
out the line.
Remember, ``You don't have to like Emacs to like it'' --- your own
Remember, ``You don't have to like Emacs to like it''---your own
Emacs can have different colors, different commands, and different
keys than a default Emacs.
......@@ -21946,7 +21947,7 @@ Here is the graph:
@sp 2
@noindent
The largest group of functions contain 10 -- 19 words and symbols each.
The largest group of functions contain 10--19 words and symbols each.
@node Free Software and Free Manuals
@appendix Free Software and Free Manuals
......
......@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ the last modification time of that directory, as recorded by Dired.
For a new buffer visiting a not yet existing file, @var{high} is
@minus{}1 and @var{low} is 65535, that is,
@ifnottex
@w{2**16 - 1.}
@w{2**16 @minus{} 1.}
@end ifnottex
@tex
@math{2^{16}-1}.
......
......@@ -2660,7 +2660,7 @@ The command @code{quoted-insert} uses this function.
@cindex control characters, reading
@cindex nonprinting characters, reading
This function is like @code{read-char}, except that if the first
character read is an octal digit (0-7), it reads any number of octal
character read is an octal digit (0--7), it reads any number of octal
digits (but stopping if a non-octal digit is found), and returns the
character represented by that numeric character code. If the
character that terminates the sequence of octal digits is @key{RET},
......
......@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ This is the @cite{GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual}
@end ifnottex
corresponding to Emacs version @value{EMACSVER}.
Copyright @copyright{} 1990-1996, 1998-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1990--1996, 1998--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ minimum range is @minus{}536870912 to 536870911 (30 bits; i.e.,
@end tex
to
@ifnottex
2**29 - 1),
2**29 @minus{} 1),
@end ifnottex
@tex
@math{2^{29}-1}),
......
......@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ latter are unique to Emacs Lisp.
@end tex
to
@ifnottex
2**29 - 1)
2**29 @minus{} 1)
@end ifnottex
@tex
@math{2^{29}-1})
......
......@@ -1411,23 +1411,23 @@ This stands for the day of month, blank-padded.
@item %h
This is a synonym for @samp{%b}.
@item %H
This stands for the hour (00-23).
This stands for the hour (00--23).
@item %I
This stands for the hour (01-12).
This stands for the hour (01--12).
@item %j
This stands for the day of the year (001-366).
This stands for the day of the year (001--366).
@item %k
This stands for the hour (0-23), blank padded.
This stands for the hour (0--23), blank padded.
@item %l
This stands for the hour (1-12), blank padded.
This stands for the hour (1--12), blank padded.
@item %m
This stands for the month (01-12).
This stands for the month (01--12).
@item %M
This stands for the minute (00-59).
This stands for the minute (00--59).
@item %n
This stands for a newline.
@item %N
This stands for the nanoseconds (000000000-999999999). To ask for
This stands for the nanoseconds (000000000--999999999). To ask for
fewer digits, use @samp{%3N} for milliseconds, @samp{%6N} for
microseconds, etc. Any excess digits are discarded, without rounding.
@item %p
......@@ -1437,18 +1437,18 @@ This is a synonym for @samp{%I:%M:%S %p}.
@item %R
This is a synonym for @samp{%H:%M}.
@item %S
This stands for the seconds (00-59).
This stands for the seconds (00--59).
@item %t
This stands for a tab character.
@item %T
This is a synonym for @samp{%H:%M:%S}.
@item %U
This stands for the week of the year (01-52), assuming that weeks
This stands for the week of the year (01--52), assuming that weeks
start on Sunday.
@item %w
This stands for the numeric day of week (0-6). Sunday is day 0.
This stands for the numeric day of week (0--6). Sunday is day 0.
@item %W
This stands for the week of the year (01-52), assuming that weeks
This stands for the week of the year (01--52), assuming that weeks
start on Monday.
@item %x
This has a locale-specific meaning. In the default locale (named
......@@ -1457,7 +1457,7 @@ This has a locale-specific meaning. In the default locale (named
This has a locale-specific meaning. In the default locale (named
@samp{C}), it is equivalent to @samp{%T}.
@item %y
This stands for the year without century (00-99).
This stands for the year without century (00--99).
@item %Y
This stands for the year with century.
@item %Z
......
......@@ -1867,7 +1867,7 @@ default value is empty, i.e., @code{(nil . nil)}.
@defopt display-buffer-alist
The value of this option is an alist mapping conditions to display
actions. Each condition may be either a regular expression matching a
buffer name or a function that takes two arguments - a buffer name and
buffer name or a function that takes two arguments: a buffer name and
the @var{action} argument passed to @code{display-buffer}. If the name
of the buffer passed to @code{display-buffer} either matches a regular
expression in this alist or the function specified by a condition
......@@ -1968,7 +1968,7 @@ height of the frame's root window.
@item
If the @sc{cdr} specifies a function, that function is called with one
argument - the new window. The function is supposed to adjust the
argument: the new window. The function is supposed to adjust the
height of the window; its return value is ignored. Suitable functions
are @code{shrink-window-if-larger-than-buffer} and
@code{fit-window-to-buffer}, see @ref{Resizing Windows}.
......@@ -1989,7 +1989,7 @@ width of the frame's root window.
@item
If the @sc{cdr} specifies a function, that function is called with one
argument - the new window. The function is supposed to adjust the width
argument: the new window. The function is supposed to adjust the width
of the window; its return value is ignored.
@end itemize
......@@ -3618,10 +3618,10 @@ This parameter is installed by the buffer display functions
(@pxref{Choosing Window}) and consulted by @code{quit-restore-window}
(@pxref{Quitting Windows}). It contains four elements:
The first element is one of the symbols @code{window} - meaning that the
window has been specially created by @code{display-buffer}, @code{frame}
- a separate frame has been created, @code{same} - the window has
displayed the same buffer before, or @code{other} - the window showed
The first element is one of the symbols @code{window}, meaning that the
window has been specially created by @code{display-buffer}; @code{frame},
a separate frame has been created; @code{same}, the window has
displayed the same buffer before; or @code{other}, the window showed
another buffer before.
The second element is either one of the symbols @code{window} or
......
......@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
@settitle Ada Mode
@copying
Copyright @copyright{} 1999-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1999--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -1506,7 +1506,7 @@ Start a comment in default column.
@item M-j
Continue comment on next line.
@item C-c ;
Comment the selected region (add -- at the beginning of lines).
Comment the selected region (add @samp{--} at the beginning of lines).
@item C-c :
Uncomment the selected region
@item M-q
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
@copying
This file describes the Emacs auth-source library.
Copyright @copyright{} 2008-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 2008--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
@c @cindex autotypist
@copying
Copyright @copyright{} 1994-1995, 1999, 2001-2012
Copyright @copyright{} 1994--1995, 1999, 2001--2012
Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
......
......@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
@c %**end of header
@copying
Copyright @copyright{} 1999-2004, 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1999--2004, 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......
......@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ This file documents Calc, the GNU Emacs calculator, included with
GNU Emacs @value{EMACSVER}.
@end ifnotinfo
Copyright @copyright{} 1990-1991, 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1990--1991, 2001--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -17330,7 +17330,7 @@ daylight saving computations. This is an internal version of
the user-level @code{pwday} function described in the previous
section. It takes four arguments: The floating-point date value,
the corresponding six-element date list, the day-of-month number,
and the weekday number (0-6).
and the weekday number (0--6).
The default daylight saving hook ignores the time zone name, but a
more sophisticated hook could use different algorithms for different
......@@ -36629,7 +36629,7 @@ time zone number or name from the top of the stack. @xref{Time Zones}.
@c 17
@item
A prefix argument specifies a day number (0-6, 0-31, or 0-366).
A prefix argument specifies a day number (0--6, 0--31, or 0--366).
@c 18
@item
......@@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ CC Mode
@copying
This manual is for CC Mode in Emacs.
Copyright @copyright{} 1995-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1995--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
......@@ -219,7 +219,7 @@ Objective-C, Java, CORBA IDL (and the variants PSDL and CIDL), Pike
and AWK code. It provides syntax-based indentation, font locking, and
has several handy commands and some minor modes to make the editing
easier. It does not provide tools to look up and navigate between
functions, classes etc - there are other packages for that.
functions, classes, etc.; there are other packages for that.
@insertcopying
@end ifnottex
......@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ Late in 1997, Martin Stjernholm joined Barry on the @ccmode{}
Maintainers Team, and implemented the Pike support. In 2000 Martin
took over as the sole maintainer. In 2001 Alan Mackenzie joined the
team, implementing AWK support in version 5.30. @ccmode{} did not
originally contain the font lock support for its languages --- that
originally contain the font lock support for its languages; that
was added in version 5.30.
This manual describes @ccmode{}
......@@ -441,7 +441,7 @@ increasing detail.
@itemize @bullet
@item
The chapter ``Configuration Basics'' tells you @emph{how} to write
customizations - whether in hooks, in styles, in both, or in neither,
customizations: whether in hooks, in styles, in both, or in neither,
depending on your needs. It describes the @ccmode{} style system and
lists the standard styles that @ccmode{} supplies.
......@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ The FAQ contains a list of common problems and questions.
@item
The next two chapters tell you how to get in touch with the @ccmode{}
project - whether for updating @ccmode{} or submitting bug reports.
project: whether for updating @ccmode{} or submitting bug reports.
@end itemize
@noindent
......@@ -715,7 +715,7 @@ current line.
When it is @code{nil}, @key{TAB} (re)indents the line only if point is
to the left of the first non-whitespace character on the line.
Otherwise it inserts some whitespace (a tab or an equivalent number of
spaces - see below) at point.
spaces; see below) at point.
@item
With some other value, the line is reindented. Additionally, if point
is within a string or comment, some whitespace is inserted.
......@@ -820,10 +820,10 @@ often (in seconds) progress messages are to be displayed.
@kindex C-c C-c
@findex comment-region
This command comments out the lines that start in the region. With a
negative argument, it does the opposite - it deletes the comment
negative argument, it does the opposite: it deletes the comment
delimiters from these lines. @xref{Multi-Line Comments,,, emacs, GNU
Emacs Manual}, for fuller details. @code{comment-region} isn't
actually part of @ccmode{} - it is given a @ccmode{} binding for
actually part of @ccmode{}; it is given a @ccmode{} binding for
convenience.
@item @kbd{M-;} (@code{comment-dwim} or @code{indent-for-comment} @footnote{The name of this command varies between (X)Emacs versions.})
......@@ -1147,7 +1147,7 @@ them yourself, e.g., after typing @samp{@}}s. Its action is suppressed
when electric mode is disabled.
@item hungry-delete mode
This lets you delete a contiguous block of whitespace with a single
key - for example, the newline and indentation just inserted by
key: for example, the newline and indentation just inserted by
auto-newline when you want to back up and write a comment after the
last statement.
@item subword mode
......@@ -1176,7 +1176,7 @@ are enabled but the other two modes are disabled.
@ccmode{} displays the current state of the first four of these minor
modes on the modeline by appending letters to the major mode's name,
one letter for each enabled minor mode - @samp{l} for electric mode,
one letter for each enabled minor mode: @samp{l} for electric mode,
@samp{a} for auto-newline mode, @samp{h} for hungry delete mode, and
@samp{w} for subword mode. If all these modes were enabled, you'd see
@samp{C/lahw}@footnote{The @samp{C} would be replaced with the name of
......@@ -1234,7 +1234,7 @@ turn it (or them) off.
@cindex electric characters
@comment !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Most punctuation keys provide @dfn{electric} behavior - as well as
Most punctuation keys provide @dfn{electric} behavior: as well as
inserting themselves they perform some other action, such as
reindenting the line. This reindentation saves you from having to
reindent a line manually after typing, say, a @samp{@}}. A few
......@@ -2101,7 +2101,7 @@ initialization and the result is prepended. For an example, see
@code{javadoc-font-lock-keywords} in @file{cc-fonts.el}.
If you add support for another doc comment style, please consider
contributing it - send a note to @email{bug-cc-mode@@gnu.org}.
contributing it: send a note to @email{bug-cc-mode@@gnu.org}.
@comment !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
......@@ -2249,7 +2249,7 @@ more sophisticated facilities, hooks and styles.
An Emacs @dfn{hook} is a place to put Lisp functions that you want
Emacs to execute later in specific circumstances.
@xref{Hooks,,,@lispref{}, @lispreftitle{}}. @ccmode{} supplies a main
hook and a language-specific hook for each language it supports - any
hook and a language-specific hook for each language it supports; any
functions you put onto these hooks get executed as the last part of a
buffer's initialization. Typically you put most of your customization
within the main hook, and use the language-specific hooks to vary the
......@@ -2683,7 +2683,7 @@ string.
If none of the built-in styles is appropriate, you'll probably want to
create a new @dfn{style definition}, possibly based on an existing
style. To do this, put the new style's settings into a list with the
following format - the list can then be passed as an argument to the
following format; the list can then be passed as an argument to the
function @code{c-add-style}. You can see an example of a style
definition in @ref{Sample .emacs File}.
......@@ -3166,7 +3166,7 @@ different ways, depending on the character just typed:
@item Braces and Colons
@ccmode{} first determines the syntactic context of the brace or colon
(@pxref{Syntactic Symbols}), then looks for a corresponding element in
an alist. This element specifies where to put newlines - this is any
an alist. This element specifies where to put newlines: this is any
combination of before and after the brace or colon. If no alist
element is found, newlines are inserted both before and after a brace,
but none are inserted around a colon. See @ref{Hanging Braces} and
......@@ -3267,7 +3267,7 @@ syntactic symbol, the associated value is either @code{nil}, a list,
or a function.
@table @asis
@item The Key - the syntactic symbol
@item The Key: the syntactic symbol
The syntactic symbols that are useful as keys in this list are
@code{brace-list-intro}, @code{statement-cont},
@code{inexpr-class-open}, @code{inexpr-class-close}, and all the
......@@ -3290,7 +3290,7 @@ lists in this regard, even though they do for normal indentation
purposes. It's currently not possible to set automatic newlines on
these constructs.
@item The associated value - the ``ACTION'' list or function
@item The associated value: the ``ACTION'' list or function
The value associated with each syntactic symbol in this association
list is called an @var{action}, which can be either a list or a
function which returns a list. @xref{Custom Braces}, for how to use
......@@ -3460,7 +3460,7 @@ that the brace appears on a line by itself.
Using a mechanism similar to brace hanging (@pxref{Hanging Braces}),
colons can also be made to hang using the style variable
@code{c-hanging-colons-alist} - When a colon is typed, @ccmode
@code{c-hanging-colons-alist}: when a colon is typed, @ccmode
determines its syntactic context, looks this up in the alist
@code{c-changing-colons-alist} and inserts up to two newlines
accordingly. Here, however, If @ccmode fails to find an entry for a
......@@ -3471,17 +3471,17 @@ newly typed colon.
@vindex hanging-colons-alist (c-)
@table @asis
@item The Key - the syntactic symbol
@item The Key: the syntactic symbol
The syntactic symbols appropriate as keys in this association list
are: @code{case-label}, @code{label}, @code{access-label},
@code{member-init-intro}, and @code{inher-intro}. @xref{Syntactic
Symbols}. Elements with any other value as a key get ignored.
@item The associate value - the ``ACTION'' list
@item The associated value: the ``ACTION'' list
The @var{action} here is simply a list containing a combination of the
symbols @code{before} and @code{after}. Unlike in
@code{c-hanging-braces-alist}, functions as @var{actions} are not
supported - there doesn't seem to be any need for them.
supported; there doesn't seem to be any need for them.
@end table
@end defopt
......@@ -3913,7 +3913,7 @@ recognized, e.g., @code{statement}, @code{substatement},
@code{class-open}, @code{class-close}, etc. @xref{Syntactic Symbols},
for a complete list of currently recognized syntactic symbols and
their semantics. The remaining entries are various data associated
with the recognized construct - there might be zero or more.
with the recognized construct; there might be zero or more.
@cindex anchor position
Conceptually, a line of code is always indented relative to some
......@@ -4570,7 +4570,7 @@ example:
Here, lines 4, 7, and 10 are all assigned @code{case-label} syntax,
while lines 5 and 8 are assigned @code{statement-case-intro}. Line 11
is treated slightly differently since it contains a brace that opens a
block --- it is given @code{statement-case-open} syntax.
block; it is given @code{statement-case-open} syntax.
@comment !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
@node Brace List Symbols, External Scope Symbols, Switch Statement Symbols, Syntactic Symbols
......@@ -4798,7 +4798,7 @@ Line 2 is assigned the @code{func-decl-cont} syntax.
@ssindex comment-intro
Line 4 is assigned both @code{defun-block-intro} @emph{and}
@code{comment-intro} syntax. A syntactic element with
@code{comment-intro} has no anchor point --- It is always accompanied
@code{comment-intro} has no anchor point. It is always accompanied
by another syntactic element which does have one.
@item
......@@ -5282,15 +5282,15 @@ values that the special symbols correspond to:
@item +
@code{c-basic-offset} times 1
@item -
@code{c-basic-offset} times -1
@code{c-basic-offset} times @minus{}1
@item ++
@code{c-basic-offset} times 2
@item --
@code{c-basic-offset} times -2
@code{c-basic-offset} times @minus{}2
@item *
@code{c-basic-offset} times 0.5
@item /
@code{c-basic-offset} times -0.5
@code{c-basic-offset} times @minus{}0.5
@end table
@item A vector
......@@ -5332,10 +5332,10 @@ Use the first offset that doesn't evaluate to @code{nil}. Subsequent
elements of the list don't get evaluated.
@item min
Use the minimum of all the offsets. All must be either relative or
absolute - they can't be mixed.
absolute; they can't be mixed.
@item max
Use the maximum of all the offsets. All must be either relative or
absolute - they can't be mixed.
absolute; they can't be mixed.
@item add
Add all the evaluated offsets together. Exactly one of them may be
absolute, in which case the result is absolute. Any relative offsets
......@@ -5493,7 +5493,7 @@ any problems writing custom line-up functions for AWK mode.
The calling convention for line-up functions is described fully in
@ref{Custom Line-Up}. Roughly speaking, the return value is either an
offset itself (such as @code{+} or @code{[0]}) or it's @code{nil},
meaning ``this function is inappropriate in this case - try a
meaning ``this function is inappropriate in this case; try a
different one''. @xref{c-offsets-alist}.
The subsections below describe all the standard line-up functions,
......@@ -6514,12 +6514,12 @@ your setup for this by using the access functions
@vindex c-syntactic-context
@vindex syntactic-context (c-)
Some syntactic symbols, e.g., @code{arglist-cont-nonempty}, have more
info in the syntactic element - typically other positions that can be
info in the syntactic element: typically other positions that can be
interesting besides the anchor position. That info can't be accessed
through the passed argument, which is a cons cell. Instead, you can
get this information from the variable @code{c-syntactic-element},
which is dynamically bound to the complete syntactic element. The
variable @code{c-syntactic-context} might also be useful - it gets
variable @code{c-syntactic-context} might also be useful: it gets
dynamically bound to the complete syntactic context. @xref{Custom
Braces}.
......
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
@copying
This file documents the GNU Emacs Common Lisp emulation package.
Copyright @copyright{} 1993, 2001-2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Copyright @copyright{} 1993, 2001--2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
@quotation