Commit fca4ec76 authored by Chong Yidong's avatar Chong Yidong

* searching.texi (String Search): Document word-search-forward-lax

and word-search-backward-lax.
(Searching and Case): Describe isearch behavior more precisely.
parent 98a326f7
2009-04-10 Chong Yidong <cyd@stupidchicken.com>
* searching.texi (String Search): Document word-search-forward-lax
and word-search-backward-lax.
(Searching and Case): Describe isearch behavior more precisely.
* keymaps.texi (Tool Bar): Mention that some platforms do not
support multi-line toolbars. Suggested by Stephen Eglen.
......
......@@ -106,11 +106,9 @@ leaves point at the beginning of the match.
@end deffn
@deffn Command word-search-forward string &optional limit noerror repeat
@c @cindex word search Redundant
This function searches forward from point for a ``word'' match for
@var{string}. If it finds a match, it sets point to the end of the
match found, and returns the new value of point.
@c Emacs 19 feature
Word matching regards @var{string} as a sequence of words, disregarding
punctuation that separates them. It searches the buffer for the same
......@@ -155,6 +153,13 @@ If @var{repeat} is non-@code{nil}, then the search is repeated that many
times. Point is positioned at the end of the last match.
@end deffn
@deffn Command word-search-forward-lax string &optional limit noerror repeat
This command is identical to @code{word-search-forward}, except that
the end of @code{string} need not match a word boundary unless it ends
in whitespace. For instance, searching for @samp{ball boy} matches
@samp{ball boyee}, but does not match @samp{aball boy}.
@end deffn
@deffn Command word-search-backward string &optional limit noerror repeat
This function searches backward from point for a word match to
@var{string}. This function is just like @code{word-search-forward}
......@@ -162,6 +167,12 @@ except that it searches backward and normally leaves point at the
beginning of the match.
@end deffn
@deffn Command word-search-backward-lax string &optional limit noerror repeat
This command is identical to @code{word-search-backward}, except that
the end of @code{string} need not match a word boundary unless it ends
in whitespace.
@end deffn
@node Searching and Case
@section Searching and Case
@cindex searching and case
......@@ -181,21 +192,11 @@ Buffer-Local}.) Alternatively, you may change the value of
@code{case-fold-search} for buffers that do not override it.
Note that the user-level incremental search feature handles case
distinctions differently. When given a lower case letter, it looks for
a match of either case, but when given an upper case letter, it looks
for an upper case letter only. But this has nothing to do with the
searching functions used in Lisp code.
@defopt case-replace
This variable determines whether the higher level replacement
functions should preserve case. If the variable is @code{nil}, that
means to use the replacement text verbatim. A non-@code{nil} value
means to convert the case of the replacement text according to the
text being replaced.
This variable is used by passing it as an argument to the function
@code{replace-match}. @xref{Replacing Match}.
@end defopt
distinctions differently. When the search string contains only lower
case letters, the search ignores case, but when the search string
contains one or more upper case letters, the search becomes
case-sensitive. But this has nothing to do with the searching
functions used in Lisp code.
@defopt case-fold-search
This buffer-local variable determines whether searches should ignore
......@@ -209,12 +210,23 @@ The value of this variable is the default value for
same as @code{(default-value 'case-fold-search)}.
@end defvar
@defopt case-replace
This variable determines whether the higher level replacement
functions should preserve case. If the variable is @code{nil}, that
means to use the replacement text verbatim. A non-@code{nil} value
means to convert the case of the replacement text according to the
text being replaced.
This variable is used by passing it as an argument to the function
@code{replace-match}. @xref{Replacing Match}.
@end defopt
@node Regular Expressions
@section Regular Expressions
@cindex regular expression
@cindex regexp
A @dfn{regular expression} (@dfn{regexp}, for short) is a pattern that
A @dfn{regular expression}, or @dfn{regexp} for short, is a pattern that
denotes a (possibly infinite) set of strings. Searching for matches for
a regexp is a very powerful operation. This section explains how to write
regexps; the following section says how to search for them.
......
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