Commit fdb82f93 authored by Pavel Janík's avatar Pavel Janík

Change doc-string comments to `new style' [w/`doc:' keyword].

parent c0a53abb
......@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
0 because unused.
* bytecode.c, callint.c, callproc.c, casefiddle.c, casetab.c
* category.c, ccl.c, charset.c, process.c, window.c: Change
* category.c, ccl.c, charset.c, process.c, syntax.c, window.c: Change
doc-string comments to `new style' [w/`doc:' keyword].
2001-10-20 Miles Bader <miles@gnu.org>
......
......@@ -21,6 +21,7 @@ Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA. */
#include <config.h>
#include "lisp.h"
#include "buffer.h"
#include "commands.h"
......@@ -62,72 +63,66 @@ static char *callint_message;
/* Allocated length of that buffer. */
static int callint_message_size;
/* This comment supplies the doc string for interactive,
for make-docfile to see. We cannot put this in the real DEFUN
due to limits in the Unix cpp.
DEFUN ("interactive", Ffoo, Sfoo, 0, 0, 0,
"Specify a way of parsing arguments for interactive use of a function.\n\
For example, write\n\
(defun foo (arg) \"Doc string\" (interactive \"p\") ...use arg...)\n\
to make ARG be the prefix argument when `foo' is called as a command.\n\
The \"call\" to `interactive' is actually a declaration rather than a function;\n\
it tells `call-interactively' how to read arguments\n\
to pass to the function.\n\
When actually called, `interactive' just returns nil.\n\
\n\
The argument of `interactive' is usually a string containing a code letter\n\
followed by a prompt. (Some code letters do not use I/O to get\n\
the argument and do not need prompts.) To prompt for multiple arguments,\n\
give a code letter, its prompt, a newline, and another code letter, etc.\n\
Prompts are passed to format, and may use % escapes to print the\n\
arguments that have already been read.\n\
If the argument is not a string, it is evaluated to get a list of\n\
arguments to pass to the function.\n\
Just `(interactive)' means pass no args when calling interactively.\n\
\nCode letters available are:\n\
a -- Function name: symbol with a function definition.\n\
b -- Name of existing buffer.\n\
B -- Name of buffer, possibly nonexistent.\n\
c -- Character (no input method is used).\n\
C -- Command name: symbol with interactive function definition.\n\
d -- Value of point as number. Does not do I/O.\n\
D -- Directory name.\n\
e -- Parametrized event (i.e., one that's a list) that invoked this command.\n\
If used more than once, the Nth `e' returns the Nth parameterized event.\n\
This skips events that are integers or symbols.\n\
f -- Existing file name.\n\
F -- Possibly nonexistent file name.\n\
i -- Ignored, i.e. always nil. Does not do I/O.\n\
k -- Key sequence (downcase the last event if needed to get a definition).\n\
K -- Key sequence to be redefined (do not downcase the last event).\n\
m -- Value of mark as number. Does not do I/O.\n\
M -- Any string. Inherits the current input method.\n\
n -- Number read using minibuffer.\n\
N -- Raw prefix arg, or if none, do like code `n'.\n\
p -- Prefix arg converted to number. Does not do I/O.\n\
P -- Prefix arg in raw form. Does not do I/O.\n\
r -- Region: point and mark as 2 numeric args, smallest first. Does no I/O.\n\
s -- Any string. Does not inherit the current input method.\n\
S -- Any symbol.\n\
v -- Variable name: symbol that is user-variable-p.\n\
x -- Lisp expression read but not evaluated.\n\
X -- Lisp expression read and evaluated.\n\
z -- Coding system.\n\
Z -- Coding system, nil if no prefix arg.\n\
In addition, if the string begins with `*'\n\
then an error is signaled if the buffer is read-only.\n\
This happens before reading any arguments.\n\
If the string begins with `@', then Emacs searches the key sequence\n\
which invoked the command for its first mouse click (or any other\n\
event which specifies a window), and selects that window before\n\
reading any arguments. You may use both `@' and `*'; they are\n\
processed in the order that they appear." */
/* ARGSUSED */
DEFUN ("interactive", Finteractive, Sinteractive, 0, UNEVALLED, 0,
0 /* See immediately above */)
(args)
doc: /* Specify a way of parsing arguments for interactive use of a function.
For example, write
(defun foo (arg) "Doc string" (interactive "p") ...use arg...)
to make ARG be the prefix argument when `foo' is called as a command.
The "call" to `interactive' is actually a declaration rather than a function;
it tells `call-interactively' how to read arguments
to pass to the function.
When actually called, `interactive' just returns nil.
The argument of `interactive' is usually a string containing a code letter
followed by a prompt. (Some code letters do not use I/O to get
the argument and do not need prompts.) To prompt for multiple arguments,
give a code letter, its prompt, a newline, and another code letter, etc.
Prompts are passed to format, and may use % escapes to print the
arguments that have already been read.
If the argument is not a string, it is evaluated to get a list of
arguments to pass to the function.
Just `(interactive)' means pass no args when calling interactively.
Code letters available are:
a -- Function name: symbol with a function definition.
b -- Name of existing buffer.
B -- Name of buffer, possibly nonexistent.
c -- Character (no input method is used).
C -- Command name: symbol with interactive function definition.
d -- Value of point as number. Does not do I/O.
D -- Directory name.
e -- Parametrized event (i.e., one that's a list) that invoked this command.
If used more than once, the Nth `e' returns the Nth parameterized event.
This skips events that are integers or symbols.
f -- Existing file name.
F -- Possibly nonexistent file name.
i -- Ignored, i.e. always nil. Does not do I/O.
k -- Key sequence (downcase the last event if needed to get a definition).
K -- Key sequence to be redefined (do not downcase the last event).
m -- Value of mark as number. Does not do I/O.
M -- Any string. Inherits the current input method.
n -- Number read using minibuffer.
N -- Raw prefix arg, or if none, do like code `n'.
p -- Prefix arg converted to number. Does not do I/O.
P -- Prefix arg in raw form. Does not do I/O.
r -- Region: point and mark as 2 numeric args, smallest first. Does no I/O.
s -- Any string. Does not inherit the current input method.
S -- Any symbol.
v -- Variable name: symbol that is user-variable-p.
x -- Lisp expression read but not evaluated.
X -- Lisp expression read and evaluated.
z -- Coding system.
Z -- Coding system, nil if no prefix arg.
In addition, if the string begins with `*'
then an error is signaled if the buffer is read-only.
This happens before reading any arguments.
If the string begins with `@', then Emacs searches the key sequence
which invoked the command for its first mouse click (or any other
event which specifies a window), and selects that window before
reading any arguments. You may use both `@' and `*'; they are
processed in the order that they appear. */)
(args)
Lisp_Object args;
{
return Qnil;
......@@ -178,19 +173,19 @@ check_mark ()
DEFUN ("call-interactively", Fcall_interactively, Scall_interactively, 1, 3, 0,
"Call FUNCTION, reading args according to its interactive calling specs.\n\
Return the value FUNCTION returns.\n\
The function contains a specification of how to do the argument reading.\n\
In the case of user-defined functions, this is specified by placing a call\n\
to the function `interactive' at the top level of the function body.\n\
See `interactive'.\n\
\n\
Optional second arg RECORD-FLAG non-nil\n\
means unconditionally put this command in the command-history.\n\
Otherwise, this is done only if an arg is read using the minibuffer.\n\
Optional third arg KEYS, if given, specifies the sequence of events to\n\
supply if the command inquires which events were used to invoke it.")
(function, record_flag, keys)
doc: /* Call FUNCTION, reading args according to its interactive calling specs.
Return the value FUNCTION returns.
The function contains a specification of how to do the argument reading.
In the case of user-defined functions, this is specified by placing a call
to the function `interactive' at the top level of the function body.
See `interactive'.
Optional second arg RECORD-FLAG non-nil
means unconditionally put this command in the command-history.
Otherwise, this is done only if an arg is read using the minibuffer.
Optional third arg KEYS, if given, specifies the sequence of events to
supply if the command inquires which events were used to invoke it. */)
(function, record_flag, keys)
Lisp_Object function, record_flag, keys;
{
Lisp_Object *args, *visargs;
......@@ -799,11 +794,11 @@ supply if the command inquires which events were used to invoke it.")
}
DEFUN ("prefix-numeric-value", Fprefix_numeric_value, Sprefix_numeric_value,
1, 1, 0,
"Return numeric meaning of raw prefix argument RAW.\n\
A raw prefix argument is what you get from `(interactive \"P\")'.\n\
Its numeric meaning is what you would get from `(interactive \"p\")'.")
(raw)
1, 1, 0,
doc: /* Return numeric meaning of raw prefix argument RAW.
A raw prefix argument is what you get from `(interactive "P")'.
Its numeric meaning is what you would get from `(interactive "p")'. */)
(raw)
Lisp_Object raw;
{
Lisp_Object val;
......@@ -866,51 +861,51 @@ syms_of_callint ()
DEFVAR_KBOARD ("prefix-arg", Vprefix_arg,
"The value of the prefix argument for the next editing command.\n\
It may be a number, or the symbol `-' for just a minus sign as arg,\n\
or a list whose car is a number for just one or more C-u's\n\
or nil if no argument has been specified.\n\
\n\
You cannot examine this variable to find the argument for this command\n\
since it has been set to nil by the time you can look.\n\
Instead, you should use the variable `current-prefix-arg', although\n\
normally commands can get this prefix argument with (interactive \"P\").");
doc: /* The value of the prefix argument for the next editing command.
It may be a number, or the symbol `-' for just a minus sign as arg,
or a list whose car is a number for just one or more C-u's
or nil if no argument has been specified.
You cannot examine this variable to find the argument for this command
since it has been set to nil by the time you can look.
Instead, you should use the variable `current-prefix-arg', although
normally commands can get this prefix argument with (interactive "P"). */);
DEFVAR_KBOARD ("last-prefix-arg", Vlast_prefix_arg,
"The value of the prefix argument for the previous editing command.\n\
See `prefix-arg' for the meaning of the value.");
doc: /* The value of the prefix argument for the previous editing command.
See `prefix-arg' for the meaning of the value. */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("current-prefix-arg", &Vcurrent_prefix_arg,
"The value of the prefix argument for this editing command.\n\
It may be a number, or the symbol `-' for just a minus sign as arg,\n\
or a list whose car is a number for just one or more C-u's\n\
or nil if no argument has been specified.\n\
This is what `(interactive \"P\")' returns.");
doc: /* The value of the prefix argument for this editing command.
It may be a number, or the symbol `-' for just a minus sign as arg,
or a list whose car is a number for just one or more C-u's
or nil if no argument has been specified.
This is what `(interactive \"P\")' returns. */);
Vcurrent_prefix_arg = Qnil;
DEFVAR_LISP ("command-history", &Vcommand_history,
"List of recent commands that read arguments from terminal.\n\
Each command is represented as a form to evaluate.");
doc: /* List of recent commands that read arguments from terminal.
Each command is represented as a form to evaluate. */);
Vcommand_history = Qnil;
DEFVAR_LISP ("command-debug-status", &Vcommand_debug_status,
"Debugging status of current interactive command.\n\
Bound each time `call-interactively' is called;\n\
may be set by the debugger as a reminder for itself.");
doc: /* Debugging status of current interactive command.
Bound each time `call-interactively' is called;
may be set by the debugger as a reminder for itself. */);
Vcommand_debug_status = Qnil;
DEFVAR_LISP ("mark-even-if-inactive", &Vmark_even_if_inactive,
"*Non-nil means you can use the mark even when inactive.\n\
This option makes a difference in Transient Mark mode.\n\
When the option is non-nil, deactivation of the mark\n\
turns off region highlighting, but commands that use the mark\n\
behave as if the mark were still active.");
doc: /* *Non-nil means you can use the mark even when inactive.
This option makes a difference in Transient Mark mode.
When the option is non-nil, deactivation of the mark
turns off region highlighting, but commands that use the mark
behave as if the mark were still active. */);
Vmark_even_if_inactive = Qnil;
DEFVAR_LISP ("mouse-leave-buffer-hook", &Vmouse_leave_buffer_hook,
"Hook to run when about to switch windows with a mouse command.\n\
Its purpose is to give temporary modes such as Isearch mode\n\
a way to turn themselves off when a mouse command switches windows.");
doc: /* Hook to run when about to switch windows with a mouse command.
Its purpose is to give temporary modes such as Isearch mode
a way to turn themselves off when a mouse command switches windows. */);
Vmouse_leave_buffer_hook = Qnil;
defsubr (&Sinteractive);
......
......@@ -189,25 +189,25 @@ call_process_cleanup (fdpid)
}
DEFUN ("call-process", Fcall_process, Scall_process, 1, MANY, 0,
"Call PROGRAM synchronously in separate process.\n\
The remaining arguments are optional.\n\
The program's input comes from file INFILE (nil means `/dev/null').\n\
Insert output in BUFFER before point; t means current buffer;\n\
nil for BUFFER means discard it; 0 means discard and don't wait.\n\
BUFFER can also have the form (REAL-BUFFER STDERR-FILE); in that case,\n\
REAL-BUFFER says what to do with standard output, as above,\n\
while STDERR-FILE says what to do with standard error in the child.\n\
STDERR-FILE may be nil (discard standard error output),\n\
t (mix it with ordinary output), or a file name string.\n\
\n\
Fourth arg DISPLAY non-nil means redisplay buffer as output is inserted.\n\
Remaining arguments are strings passed as command arguments to PROGRAM.\n\
\n\
If BUFFER is 0, `call-process' returns immediately with value nil.\n\
Otherwise it waits for PROGRAM to terminate\n\
and returns a numeric exit status or a signal description string.\n\
If you quit, the process is killed with SIGINT, or SIGKILL if you quit again.")
(nargs, args)
doc: /* Call PROGRAM synchronously in separate process.
The remaining arguments are optional.
The program's input comes from file INFILE (nil means `/dev/null').
Insert output in BUFFER before point; t means current buffer;
nil for BUFFER means discard it; 0 means discard and don't wait.
BUFFER can also have the form (REAL-BUFFER STDERR-FILE); in that case,
REAL-BUFFER says what to do with standard output, as above,
while STDERR-FILE says what to do with standard error in the child.
STDERR-FILE may be nil (discard standard error output),
t (mix it with ordinary output), or a file name string.
Fourth arg DISPLAY non-nil means redisplay buffer as output is inserted.
Remaining arguments are strings passed as command arguments to PROGRAM.
If BUFFER is 0, `call-process' returns immediately with value nil.
Otherwise it waits for PROGRAM to terminate
and returns a numeric exit status or a signal description string.
If you quit, the process is killed with SIGINT, or SIGKILL if you quit again. */)
(nargs, args)
int nargs;
register Lisp_Object *args;
{
......@@ -971,27 +971,27 @@ delete_temp_file (name)
}
DEFUN ("call-process-region", Fcall_process_region, Scall_process_region,
3, MANY, 0,
"Send text from START to END to a synchronous process running PROGRAM.\n\
The remaining arguments are optional.\n\
Delete the text if fourth arg DELETE is non-nil.\n\
\n\
Insert output in BUFFER before point; t means current buffer;\n\
nil for BUFFER means discard it; 0 means discard and don't wait.\n\
BUFFER can also have the form (REAL-BUFFER STDERR-FILE); in that case,\n\
REAL-BUFFER says what to do with standard output, as above,\n\
while STDERR-FILE says what to do with standard error in the child.\n\
STDERR-FILE may be nil (discard standard error output),\n\
t (mix it with ordinary output), or a file name string.\n\
\n\
Sixth arg DISPLAY non-nil means redisplay buffer as output is inserted.\n\
Remaining args are passed to PROGRAM at startup as command args.\n\
\n\
If BUFFER is nil, `call-process-region' returns immediately with value nil.\n\
Otherwise it waits for PROGRAM to terminate\n\
and returns a numeric exit status or a signal description string.\n\
If you quit, the process is killed with SIGINT, or SIGKILL if you quit again.")
(nargs, args)
3, MANY, 0,
doc: /* Send text from START to END to a synchronous process running PROGRAM.
The remaining arguments are optional.
Delete the text if fourth arg DELETE is non-nil.
Insert output in BUFFER before point; t means current buffer;
nil for BUFFER means discard it; 0 means discard and don't wait.
BUFFER can also have the form (REAL-BUFFER STDERR-FILE); in that case,
REAL-BUFFER says what to do with standard output, as above,
while STDERR-FILE says what to do with standard error in the child.
STDERR-FILE may be nil (discard standard error output),
t (mix it with ordinary output), or a file name string.
Sixth arg DISPLAY non-nil means redisplay buffer as output is inserted.
Remaining args are passed to PROGRAM at startup as command args.
If BUFFER is nil, `call-process-region' returns immediately with value nil.
Otherwise it waits for PROGRAM to terminate
and returns a numeric exit status or a signal description string.
If you quit, the process is killed with SIGINT, or SIGKILL if you quit again. */)
(nargs, args)
int nargs;
register Lisp_Object *args;
{
......@@ -1406,10 +1406,10 @@ getenv_internal (var, varlen, value, valuelen)
}
DEFUN ("getenv-internal", Fgetenv_internal, Sgetenv_internal, 1, 1, 0,
"Return the value of environment variable VAR, as a string.\n\
VAR should be a string. Value is nil if VAR is undefined in the environment.\n\
This function consults the variable ``process-environment'' for its value.")
(var)
doc: /* Return the value of environment variable VAR, as a string.
VAR should be a string. Value is nil if VAR is undefined in the environment.
This function consults the variable ``process-environment'' for its value. */)
(var)
Lisp_Object var;
{
char *value;
......@@ -1579,50 +1579,50 @@ syms_of_callproc ()
#endif /* DOS_NT */
DEFVAR_LISP ("shell-file-name", &Vshell_file_name,
"*File name to load inferior shells from.\n\
Initialized from the SHELL environment variable.");
doc: /* *File name to load inferior shells from.
Initialized from the SHELL environment variable. */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("exec-path", &Vexec_path,
"*List of directories to search programs to run in subprocesses.\n\
Each element is a string (directory name) or nil (try default directory).");
doc: /* *List of directories to search programs to run in subprocesses.
Each element is a string (directory name) or nil (try default directory). */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("exec-suffixes", &Vexec_suffixes,
"*List of suffixes to try to find executable file names.\n\
Each element is a string");
doc: /* *List of suffixes to try to find executable file names.
Each element is a string. */);
Vexec_suffixes = Qnil;
DEFVAR_LISP ("exec-directory", &Vexec_directory,
"Directory for executables for Emacs to invoke.\n\
More generally, this includes any architecture-dependent files\n\
that are built and installed from the Emacs distribution.");
doc: /* Directory for executables for Emacs to invoke.
More generally, this includes any architecture-dependent files
that are built and installed from the Emacs distribution. */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("data-directory", &Vdata_directory,
"Directory of machine-independent files that come with GNU Emacs.\n\
These are files intended for Emacs to use while it runs.");
doc: /* Directory of machine-independent files that come with GNU Emacs.
These are files intended for Emacs to use while it runs. */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("doc-directory", &Vdoc_directory,
"Directory containing the DOC file that comes with GNU Emacs.\n\
This is usually the same as data-directory.");
doc: /* Directory containing the DOC file that comes with GNU Emacs.
This is usually the same as data-directory. */);
DEFVAR_LISP ("configure-info-directory", &Vconfigure_info_directory,
"For internal use by the build procedure only.\n\
This is the name of the directory in which the build procedure installed\n\
Emacs's info files; the default value for Info-default-directory-list\n\
includes this.");
doc: /* For internal use by the build procedure only.
This is the name of the directory in which the build procedure installed
Emacs's info files; the default value for Info-default-directory-list
includes this. */);
Vconfigure_info_directory = build_string (PATH_INFO);
DEFVAR_LISP ("temp-file-name-pattern", &Vtemp_file_name_pattern,
"Pattern for making names for temporary files.\n\
This is used by `call-process-region'.");
doc: /* Pattern for making names for temporary files.
This is used by `call-process-region'. */);
/* This variable is initialized in init_callproc. */
DEFVAR_LISP ("process-environment", &Vprocess_environment,
"List of environment variables for subprocesses to inherit.\n\
Each element should be a string of the form ENVVARNAME=VALUE.\n\
If multiple entries define the same variable, the first one always\n\
takes precedence.\n\
The environment which Emacs inherits is placed in this variable\n\
when Emacs starts.");
doc: /* List of environment variables for subprocesses to inherit.
Each element should be a string of the form ENVVARNAME=VALUE.
If multiple entries define the same variable, the first one always
takes precedence.
The environment which Emacs inherits is placed in this variable
when Emacs starts. */);
#ifndef VMS
defsubr (&Scall_process);
......
......@@ -134,33 +134,33 @@ casify_object (flag, obj)
}
DEFUN ("upcase", Fupcase, Supcase, 1, 1, 0,
"Convert argument to upper case and return that.\n\
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.\n\
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.\n\
See also `capitalize', `downcase' and `upcase-initials'.")
(obj)
doc: /* Convert argument to upper case and return that.
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.
See also `capitalize', `downcase' and `upcase-initials'. */)
(obj)
Lisp_Object obj;
{
return casify_object (CASE_UP, obj);
}
DEFUN ("downcase", Fdowncase, Sdowncase, 1, 1, 0,
"Convert argument to lower case and return that.\n\
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.\n\
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.")
(obj)
doc: /* Convert argument to lower case and return that.
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy. */)
(obj)
Lisp_Object obj;
{
return casify_object (CASE_DOWN, obj);
}
DEFUN ("capitalize", Fcapitalize, Scapitalize, 1, 1, 0,
"Convert argument to capitalized form and return that.\n\
This means that each word's first character is upper case\n\
and the rest is lower case.\n\
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.\n\
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.")
(obj)
doc: /* Convert argument to capitalized form and return that.
This means that each word's first character is upper case
and the rest is lower case.
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy. */)
(obj)
Lisp_Object obj;
{
return casify_object (CASE_CAPITALIZE, obj);
......@@ -169,11 +169,11 @@ The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.")
/* Like Fcapitalize but change only the initials. */
DEFUN ("upcase-initials", Fupcase_initials, Supcase_initials, 1, 1, 0,
"Convert the initial of each word in the argument to upper case.\n\
Do not change the other letters of each word.\n\
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.\n\
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy.")
(obj)
doc: /* Convert the initial of each word in the argument to upper case.
Do not change the other letters of each word.
The argument may be a character or string. The result has the same type.
The argument object is not altered--the value is a copy. */)
(obj)
Lisp_Object obj;
{
return casify_object (CASE_CAPITALIZE_UP, obj);
......@@ -293,12 +293,12 @@ casify_region (flag, b, e)
}
DEFUN ("upcase-region", Fupcase_region, Supcase_region, 2, 2, "r",
"Convert the region to upper case. In programs, wants two arguments.\n\
These arguments specify the starting and ending character numbers of\n\
the region to operate on. When used as a command, the text between\n\
point and the mark is operated on.\n\
See also `capitalize-region'.")
(beg, end)
doc: /* Convert the region to upper case. In programs, wants two arguments.
These arguments specify the starting and ending character numbers of
the region to operate on. When used as a command, the text between
point and the mark is operated on.
See also `capitalize-region'. */)
(beg, end)
Lisp_Object beg, end;
{
casify_region (CASE_UP, beg, end);
......@@ -306,11 +306,11 @@ See also `capitalize-region'.")
}
DEFUN ("downcase-region", Fdowncase_region, Sdowncase_region, 2, 2, "r",
"Convert the region to lower case. In programs, wants two arguments.\n\
These arguments specify the starting and ending character numbers of\n\
the region to operate on. When used as a command, the text between\n\
point and the mark is operated on.")
(beg, end)
doc: /* Convert the region to lower case. In programs, wants two arguments.
These arguments specify the starting and ending character numbers of
the region to operate on. When used as a command, the text between
point and the mark is operated on. */)
(beg, end)
Lisp_Object beg, end;
{
casify_region (CASE_DOWN, beg, end);
......@@ -318,12 +318,12 @@ point and the mark is operated on.")
}
DEFUN ("capitalize-region", Fcapitalize_region, Scapitalize_region, 2, 2, "r",
"Convert the region to capitalized form.\n\
Capitalized form means each word's first character is upper case\n\
and the rest of it is lower case.\n\
In programs, give two arguments, the starting and ending\n\
character positions to operate on.")
(beg, end)
doc: /* Convert the region to capitalized form.
Capitalized form means each word's first character is upper case
and the rest of it is lower case.
In programs, give two arguments, the starting and ending
character positions to operate on. */)
(beg, end)
Lisp_Object beg, end;
{
casify_region (CASE_CAPITALIZE, beg, end);
......@@ -334,11 +334,11 @@ character positions to operate on.")
DEFUN ("upcase-initials-region", Fupcase_initials_region,
Supcase_initials_region, 2, 2, "r",
"Upcase the initial of each word in the region.\n\
Subsequent letters of each word are not changed.\n\
In programs, give two arguments, the starting and ending\n\
character positions to operate on.")
(beg, end)
doc: /* Upcase the initial of each word in the region.
Subsequent letters of each word are not changed.
In programs, give two arguments, the starting and ending
character positions to operate on. */)
(beg, end)
Lisp_Object beg, end;
{
casify_region (CASE_CAPITALIZE_UP, beg, end);
......@@ -367,10 +367,10 @@ operate_on_word (arg, newpoint)
}
DEFUN ("upcase-word", Fupcase_word, Supcase_word, 1, 1, "p",
"Convert following word (or ARG words) to upper case, moving over.\n\
With negative argument, convert previous words but do not move.\n\
See also `capitalize-word'.")
(arg)
doc: /* Convert following word (or ARG words) to upper case, moving over.
With negative argument, convert previous words but do not move.
See also `capitalize-word'. */)
(arg)
Lisp_Object arg;
{
Lisp_Object beg, end;
......@@ -383,9 +383,9 @@ See also `capitalize-word'.")
}
DEFUN ("downcase-word", Fdowncase_word, Sdowncase_word, 1, 1, "p",
"Convert following word (or ARG words) to lower case, moving over.\n\
With negative argument, convert previous words but do not move.")
(arg)
doc: /* Convert following word (or ARG words) to lower case, moving over.
With negative argument, convert previous words but do not move. */)
(arg)
Lisp_Object arg;
{
Lisp_Object beg, end;
......@@ -398,11 +398,11 @@ With negative argument, convert previous words but do not move.")
}
DEFUN ("capitalize-word", Fcapitalize_word, Scapitalize_word, 1, 1, "p",
"Capitalize the following word (or ARG words), moving over.\n\
This gives the word(s) a first character in upper case\n\
and the rest lower case.\n\
With negative argument, capitalize previous words but do not move.")
(arg)
doc: /* Capitalize the following word (or ARG words), moving over.
This gives the word(s) a first character in upper case
and the rest lower case.
With negative argument, capitalize previous words but do not move. */)
(arg)
Lisp_Object arg;