Commit 53006746 authored by Alan Mackenzie's avatar Alan Mackenzie

Correct "different than" to "different from" where appropriate

(doc/emacs/screen.texi)
(doc/lispintro/emacs-lisp-intro.texi)
(doc/misc/calc.texi)
(doc/misc/gnus.texi)
(doc/misc/sc.texi)
(lisp/align.el)
(lisp/allout-widgets.el)
(lisp/allout.el)
(lisp/emacs-lisp/gv.el)
(lisp/font-lock.el)
(lisp/gnus/mm-util.el)
(lisp/mail/feedmail.el)
(lisp/mail/sendmail.el)
(lisp/mail/supercite.el)
(lisp/org/org-attach.el)
(lisp/progmodes/cc-langs.el)
(lisp/progmodes/idlw-shell.el)
(lisp/ps-print.el)
(lisp/simple.el)
(src/cmds.c)
(src/editfns.c)
(src/frame.h)
(src/regex-emacs.c)
(src/xfaces.c): Replace "different than" by "different from".
parent 56b8768b
Pipeline #4769 passed with stage
in 54 minutes and 34 seconds
......@@ -167,7 +167,7 @@ what is going on in the current buffer. When there is only one
window, the mode line appears right above the echo area; it is the
next-to-last line in the frame. On a graphical display, the mode line
is drawn with a 3D box appearance. Emacs also usually draws the mode
line of the selected window with a different color than that of
line of the selected window with a different color from that of
unselected windows, in order to make it stand out.
The text displayed in the mode line has the following format:
......
......@@ -12919,7 +12919,7 @@ familiar part of this function.
@unnumberedsubsec The @code{let*} expression
The next line of the @code{forward-paragraph} function begins a
@code{let*} expression. This is a different than @code{let}. The
@code{let*} expression. This is different from @code{let}. The
symbol is @code{let*} not @code{let}.
@findex let*
......
......@@ -27155,7 +27155,7 @@ anywhere in the formula.
It is possible for a rule set to get into an infinite loop. The
most obvious case, replacing a formula with itself, is not a problem
because a rule is not considered to ``succeed'' unless the righthand
side actually comes out to something different than the original
side actually comes out to something different from the original
formula or sub-formula that was matched. But if you accidentally
had both @samp{ln(a b) := ln(a) + ln(b)} and the reverse
@samp{ln(a) + ln(b) := ln(a b)} in your rule set, Calc would
......@@ -28075,7 +28075,7 @@ for angstroms.
The unit @code{pt} stands for pints; the name @code{point} stands for
a typographical point, defined by @samp{72 point = 1 in}. This is
slightly different than the point defined by the American Typefounder's
slightly different from the point defined by the American Typefounder's
Association in 1886, but the point used by Calc has become standard
largely due to its use by the PostScript page description language.
There is also @code{texpt}, which stands for a printer's point as
......@@ -27664,7 +27664,7 @@ added. A plethora of new commands and modes have been added.
@xref{Gnus Unplugged}, for the full story.
@item
The @code{nndraft} back end has returned, but works differently than
The @code{nndraft} back end has returned, but works differently from
before. All Message buffers are now also articles in the @code{nndraft}
group, which is created automatically.
......@@ -1033,7 +1033,7 @@ that will be used to composed a non-nested citation string. Supercite
scans the various mail headers present in the original article and uses
a number of heuristics to extract strings which it puts into the
@dfn{attribution association list} or @dfn{attribution alist}. This is
analogous, but different than, the info alist previously mentioned. Each
analogous, but different from, the info alist previously mentioned. Each
element in the attribution alist is a key-value pair containing such
information as the author's first name, middle names, and last name, the
author's initials, and the author's email terminus.
......@@ -1330,7 +1330,7 @@ co-worker that uses an uncommon citation style (say one that employs a
possible for Supercite to recognize this and @emph{coerce} the citation
to your preferred style, for consistency. In theory, it is possible for
Supercite to recognize such things as uuencoded messages or C code and
cite or fill those differently than normal text. None of this is
cite or fill those differently from normal text. None of this is
currently part of Supercite, but contributions are welcome!
@node Using Regi
......
......@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@ The possible settings for `align-region-separate' are:
`group' Each contiguous set of lines where a specific alignment
occurs is considered a section for that alignment rule.
Note that each rule may have any entirely different set
of section divisions than another.
of section divisions from another.
int alpha = 1; /* one */
double beta = 2.0;
......
......@@ -1847,7 +1847,7 @@ Optional HAS-SUCCESSOR is true if the item is followed by a sibling.
We also hide the header-prefix string.
Guides are established according to the item-widget's :guide-column-flags,
when different than :was-guide-column-flags. Changing that property and
when different from :was-guide-column-flags. Changing that property and
reapplying this method will rectify the glyphs."
(when (not (widget-get item-widget :is-container))
......
......@@ -5948,7 +5948,7 @@ See `allout-toggle-current-subtree-encryption' for more details."
(setq buffer-file-coding-system
(allout-select-safe-coding-system subtree-beg subtree-end))
;; if the coding system for the text being encrypted is different
;; than that prevailing, then there a real risk that the coding
;; from that prevailing, then there a real risk that the coding
;; system can't be noticed by emacs when the file is visited. to
;; mitigate that, offer to preserve the coding system using a file
;; local variable.
......
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
;;; Commentary:
;; This is a re-implementation of the setf machinery using a different
;; underlying approach than the one used earlier in CL, which was based on
;; underlying approach from the one used earlier in CL, which was based on
;; define-setf-expander.
;; `define-setf-expander' makes every "place-expander" return a 5-tuple
;; (VARS VALUES STORES GETTER SETTER)
......
......@@ -1004,14 +1004,14 @@ The value of this variable is used when Font Lock mode is turned on."
;; font-lock.el uses its own function for buffer fontification. This function
;; makes fontification be on a message-by-message basis and so visiting an
;; RMAIL file is much faster. A clever implementation of the function might
;; fontify the headers differently than the message body. (It should, and
;; fontify the headers differently from the message body. (It should, and
;; correspondingly for Mail mode, but I can't be bothered to do the work. Can
;; you?) This hints at a more interesting use...
;;
;; Languages that contain text normally contained in different major modes
;; could define their own fontification functions that treat text differently
;; depending on its context. For example, Perl mode could arrange that here
;; docs are fontified differently than Perl code. Or Yacc mode could fontify
;; docs are fontified differently from Perl code. Or Yacc mode could fontify
;; rules one way and C code another. Neat!
;;
;; A further reason to use the fontification indirection feature is when the
......
......@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@
;; positions!
,@(unless (mm-coding-system-p 'iso-8859-15)
'((iso-8859-15 . iso-8859-1)))
;; BIG-5HKSCS is similar to, but different than, BIG-5.
;; BIG-5HKSCS is similar to, but different from, BIG-5.
,@(unless (mm-coding-system-p 'big5-hkscs)
'((big5-hkscs . big5)))
;; A Microsoft misunderstanding.
......
......@@ -1552,7 +1552,7 @@ in a buffer, try /bin/rmail instead of /bin/mail. If /bin/rmail
exists, this can be accomplished by keeping the default nil setting of
`mail-interactive'. You might also like to consult local mail experts
for any other interesting command line possibilities. Some versions
of UNIX have an rmail program which behaves differently than
of UNIX have an rmail program which behaves differently from
/bin/rmail and complains if feedmail gives it a message on stdin. If
you don't know about such things and if there is no local expert to
consult, stick with /bin/mail or use one of the other buffer eating
......
......@@ -1222,7 +1222,7 @@ external program defined by `sendmail-program'."
(delete-region (line-beginning-position)
(line-beginning-position 2))))
;; Apparently this causes a duplicate Sender.
;; ;; If the From is different than current user, insert Sender.
;; ;; If the From is different from current user, insert Sender.
;; (goto-char (point-min))
;; (and (re-search-forward "^From:" delimline t)
;; (progn
......
......@@ -1311,7 +1311,7 @@ use it instead of `sc-citation-root-regexp'."
;; filling
(defun sc-fill-if-different (&optional prefix)
"Fill the region bounded by `sc-fill-begin' and point.
Only fill if optional PREFIX is different than `sc-fill-line-prefix'.
Only fill if optional PREFIX is different from `sc-fill-line-prefix'.
If `sc-auto-fill-region-p' is nil, do not fill region. If PREFIX is
not supplied, initialize fill variables. This is useful for a regi
`begin' frame-entry."
......
......@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ attachment-folder.
Change of attachment-folder due to unset might be if an ID
property is set on the node, or if a separate inherited
DIR-property exists (that is different than the unset one)."
DIR-property exists (that is different from the unset one)."
(interactive)
(let ((old (org-attach-dir))
(new
......
......@@ -86,7 +86,7 @@
;; compiled runtime constants ready for use by (the byte compiled) CC
;; Mode, and the source definitions in this file don't have to be
;; loaded then. However, if a byte compiled package is loaded that
;; has been compiled with a different version of CC Mode than the one
;; has been compiled with a different version of CC Mode from the one
;; currently loaded, then the compiled-in values will be discarded and
;; new ones will be built when the mode is initialized. That will
;; automatically trig a load of the file(s) containing the source
......
......@@ -3502,7 +3502,7 @@ Returns nil if frame not found."
(defun idlwave-shell-new-bp (bp)
"Find the new breakpoint in IDL's list and update with DATA.
The actual line number for a breakpoint in IDL may be different than
The actual line number for a breakpoint in IDL may be different from
the line number used with the IDL breakpoint command.
Looks for a new breakpoint index number in the list. This is
considered the new breakpoint if the file name of frame matches."
......
......@@ -3046,7 +3046,7 @@ See also `ps-use-face-background'."
(defcustom ps-fg-list nil
"Specify foreground color list.
This list is used to chose a text foreground color which is different than the
This list is used to chose a text foreground color which is different from the
background color. It'll be used the first foreground color in `ps-fg-list'
which is different from the background color.
......@@ -6028,8 +6028,8 @@ to the equivalent Latin-1 characters.")
;; Specify a foreground color only if:
;; one's specified,
;; it's different than the background (if `ps-fg-validate-p' is non-nil)
;; and it's different than the current.
;; it's different from the background (if `ps-fg-validate-p' is non-nil)
;; and it's different from the current.
(let ((fg (or fg-color ps-default-foreground)))
(if ps-fg-validate-p
(let ((bg (or bg-color ps-default-background))
......
......@@ -2733,7 +2733,7 @@ Return what remains of the list."
;; said it would do.
(unless (and (= start start-mark)
(= (+ delta end) end-mark))
(error "Changes to be undone by function different than announced"))
(error "Changes to be undone by function different from announced"))
(set-marker start-mark nil)
(set-marker end-mark nil))
(apply fun-args))
......
......@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ With argument N not nil or 1, move forward N - 1 lines first.
If point reaches the beginning or end of buffer, it stops there.
This function constrains point to the current field unless this moves
point to a different line than the original, unconstrained result.
point to a different line from the original, unconstrained result.
If N is nil or 1, and a front-sticky field starts at point, the point
does not move. To ignore field boundaries bind
`inhibit-field-text-motion' to t, or use the `forward-line' function
......@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ If point reaches the beginning or end of buffer, it stops there.
To ignore intangibility, bind `inhibit-point-motion-hooks' to t.
This function constrains point to the current field unless this moves
point to a different line than the original, unconstrained result. If
point to a different line from the original, unconstrained result. If
N is nil or 1, and a rear-sticky field ends at point, the point does
not move. To ignore field boundaries bind `inhibit-field-text-motion'
to t. */)
......
......@@ -717,7 +717,7 @@ position of the first character in logical order, i.e. the smallest
character position on the line.
This function constrains the returned position to the current field
unless that position would be on a different line than the original,
unless that position would be on a different line from the original,
unconstrained result. If N is nil or 1, and a front-sticky field
starts at point, the scan stops as soon as it starts. To ignore field
boundaries, bind `inhibit-field-text-motion' to t.
......@@ -750,7 +750,7 @@ position of the last character in logical order, i.e. the largest
character position on the line.
This function constrains the returned position to the current field
unless that would be on a different line than the original,
unless that would be on a different line from the original,
unconstrained result. If N is nil or 1, and a rear-sticky field ends
at point, the scan stops as soon as it starts. To ignore field
boundaries bind `inhibit-field-text-motion' to t.
......
......@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ struct frame
to redirect keystrokes to a surrogate minibuffer frame when
needed.
Note that a value of nil is different than having the field point
Note that a value of nil is different from having the field point
to the frame itself. Whenever the Fselect_frame function is used
to shift from one frame to the other, any redirections to the
original frame are shifted to the newly selected frame; if
......
......@@ -3932,7 +3932,7 @@ re_match_2_internal (struct re_pattern_buffer *bufp,
allocate space for that if we're not allocating space for anything
else (see below). Also, we never need info about register 0 for
any of the other register vectors, and it seems rather a kludge to
treat 'best_regend' differently than the rest. So we keep track of
treat 'best_regend' differently from the rest. So we keep track of
the end of the best match so far in a separate variable. We
initialize this to NULL so that when we backtrack the first time
and need to test it, it's not garbage. */
......
......@@ -4940,7 +4940,7 @@ DEFUN ("face-attributes-as-vector", Fface_attributes_as_vector,
that a face containing all the attributes in ATTRS, when merged with the
default face for display, can be represented in a way that's
(1) different in appearance than the default face, and
(1) different in appearance from the default face, and
(2) `close in spirit' to what the attributes specify, if not exact. */
static bool
......@@ -5043,7 +5043,7 @@ gui_supports_face_attributes_p (struct frame *f,
that a face containing all the attributes in ATTRS, when merged
with the default face for display, can be represented in a way that's
(1) different in appearance than the default face, and
(1) different in appearance from the default face, and
(2) `close in spirit' to what the attributes specify, if not exact.
Point (2) implies that a `:weight black' attribute will be satisfied
......@@ -5160,7 +5160,7 @@ tty_supports_face_attributes_p (struct frame *f,
> TTY_SAME_COLOR_THRESHOLD)
return false; /* displayed color is too different */
else
/* Make sure the color is really different than the default. */
/* Make sure the color is really different from the default. */
{
Emacs_Color def_fg_color;
if (tty_lookup_color (f, def_fg, &def_fg_color, 0)
......@@ -5184,7 +5184,7 @@ tty_supports_face_attributes_p (struct frame *f,
> TTY_SAME_COLOR_THRESHOLD)
return false; /* displayed color is too different */
else
/* Make sure the color is really different than the default. */
/* Make sure the color is really different from the default. */
{
Emacs_Color def_bg_color;
if (tty_lookup_color (f, def_bg, &def_bg_color, 0)
......@@ -5226,7 +5226,7 @@ The definition of `supported' is somewhat heuristic, but basically means
that a face containing all the attributes in ATTRIBUTES, when merged
with the default face for display, can be represented in a way that's
(1) different in appearance than the default face, and
(1) different in appearance from the default face, and
(2) `close in spirit' to what the attributes specify, if not exact.
Point (2) implies that a `:weight black' attribute will be satisfied by
......
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